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Old 17-08-2013, 06:05   #16
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

I will get the ball rolling .

Firstly, I would not make it a popular production boat, as you are bound to get some details wrong, which will grate with any experienced sailors reading the novel.

I would suggest you make it a one off boat like ours - it is arguably the best type of boat for two people blue water cruising .

48 foot cutter rigged sloop
Aluminium - strong, relatively lightweight
Solidly built - well reinforced, collision bulkheads at both ends
Easily handled by two people without powered winches
1000 litre fuel capacity
Watermaker etc (PM me for details)

I would not mention electronics too much, as these are altering very rapidly and will date the book.

I think the description of a boat such as this would also be of more interest to keen sailors than a production line boat where most of the details are fixed .
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Old 17-08-2013, 06:07   #17
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

Hiya Dee! A well built cruiser that I recommend for your novel is the "Beneteau - Oceanis 37". It is rugged and perfect for single handling. From engineering point of view: It is simple, yet elegant with easy access to the engine. The stern has a " low shelf" with a folding ladder; a must have for those of us who are avid snorkelers and SCUBA divers. Take a look at some of the available layout! Let me know what do you think! (Disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with Beneteau, in any capacity.)

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Old 17-08-2013, 06:28   #18
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

The Queen Victoria Cruise ship. No kidding..
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Old 17-08-2013, 07:12   #19
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The black falcon might fit the bill... Does it matter the size? It's how ya sail it is what I heard!!!
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Old 17-08-2013, 07:16   #20
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Or maybe the Maltese Falcon if ya prefer perini built
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Old 17-08-2013, 07:24   #21
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

She is looking for a SINGLE handling boat; size does matter! Ruggedness, ease of access and serviceability are paramount. While a metal hull is sturdier than fiber glass, it is difficult to repair in many countries. The stern's "lower shelf" is a great ergonomic feature not only as a platform for snorkeling/diving, but also when uploading provisions from a dinghy.

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Old 17-08-2013, 07:26   #22
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

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Originally Posted by DiverChick71 View Post
Hmm...I'll weigh in. My thought is that anyone that sails usually has some sort of budget. Even if it's a large one. And then if the person is just ridiculously rich (thinking about that Dirk whoever guy in the Clive Cussler novels) then it just becomes unbelievable and as a reader, I really don't enjoy that as much. But hey...they are your characters so go for it. But... Is the experienced sailor the man or the woman? If it's a man, and has a budget, I'm leaning towards something like a Tayana 37. Shallow draft, stable double ender, very classic, super solid boat. If the sailor is a woman, I'm seeing more of a moderate displacement boat. Like a Moody 42. Something a little more modern, but very common in that part of the world. And if no budget....well...a Little Harbor 53 has always been my "If I win the lottery..." boat.
Could not have put it better. Sure there are plenty of people on the planet that could buy any boat they want with no budget constraints, however it is doubtful that anyone in this category would choose to make a sail as described by DeeB. I cannot recall any one of this description ever making a voyage anything like this. People with unlimited budgets will have a big, fancy crewed yacht with hot and cold running maids.

Another issue, why such a rush to get from France to Micronesia? To make it believable you will really need a good plot twist. Normally if you want get there in a hurry then you go commercial. If you want to go by boat then, unless you are doing some sort of race, you will stop and smell the coffee.

For the boat, I'll vote for the Little Harbor.
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Old 17-08-2013, 07:35   #23
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

There is no point in ridiculing her decision why she is going from A to B, through the moon canal. Just help her by giving her your best judgement on a boat that can sail this long voyage. It would help everyone to let us know "why you picked this boat?". After all, CF is regarded by many of us as a learning/experience "channel".

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Old 17-08-2013, 07:45   #24
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Re: Choosing the perfect boat

The expert sailor travels from Marseille to Hallberg-Rassyvägen 1, SE-474 31 Ellös, Sweden to inspect his newly finished Hallberg Rassy 372. Oops! I'm writing the book for you!

HR makes some great bluewater sailing vessels. You could have HR ship the boat to Marseille or the characters could sail it there. I'd have them hire HR to sail it to Marseille as the shakedown cruise to get the kinks out if you don't want to make the manufacturer at fault for any failures.

HR makes a few smaller boats and many larger than the 372 but the 372 should give a crew of two (one being inexperienced) the ability to sail the boat singlehanded, which will be the case in the beginning.

If you plan to write in some failure in the boat to add suspense, I'd choose an older boat and eliminate the shakedown cruise by the manufacturer.

Other possible boats could be Nautor's Swan or Oyster, but to get smaller boats (under 40 feet) you'll have to go back a few years. You could go to Yachtworld and get some information on the boat you'll choose, if you go used.

A great older bluewater boats could be the Shannon. I've read a number of stories where Shannons as small as 28' have circumnavigated.

All of these boats will outlast the crew, so make sure the experienced character is very physically fit if you plan on putting them through an intense sailing experience.

Hope this helps.
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Old 17-08-2013, 08:00   #25
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

I would chose a Jeanneau, a Beneteau, a Dufour or any other boat that might be popular in Marseilles. This will make the story truer.

If you make your characters rich they could be sailing an Amel, OVNI or a Cigale.

Amel gives the edge of being designed for long range cruising. But 99.9% of your readers will not know this, so I would rather do with a name/make that sounds well.

If they go in an OVNI, they will be able to do some crazy things like go into shallow creeks, beach the boat, sail inside atolls or bump into coral heads without too much damage (but still plenty of drama) - she has a lifting keel.

If they go in a Cigale, they will be quite contrary - unable to go into many places that have shallow spots - she has a very deep keel. BUT some Cigales have water ballast, that can be drunk when that watermaker fails ... so perhaps a water-ballasted Cigale with an iffy watermaker onboard is a good start.

BTW I have just talked to a couple going to Brazil. They are sailing a Cigale 18. So here too a 100% realistic boat.

Cheers,
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Old 17-08-2013, 08:37   #26
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

Pacific Seacraft 34' or 37'.

Go with a tiller so there's more room for dancing in the cockpit.

Watermaker for either. A good dingy might be nice, but not required.

It's your boat/book. Sail it anywhere you want to.
Chris sailed off the edge of the world and back.

If speed is the issue, fly.
thanks b,
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Old 17-08-2013, 08:47   #27
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

I appreciate the fact that the OP is doing "research", however, I find it difficult to do her "homework" for her only because she asked the question.

There are, at last count, 5,118 posts on just the General Forum under fleets. It would seem to be prudent to ask the OP if she's read all of the them before even beginning to answer this question.

As many have stated before, on this and other boating forums, many of these kind of "What's the best...?" (of anything) have been asked & answered so many times that many of us have applied the use of links to earlier discussions to avoid having the retype the same material over and over again.

Good luck in your research, I'd take a Pacific Seacraft... or the Oyster, or the HR...

Oh, here's another example or a bit of "research" so she doesn't have to do HER OWN "homework"

A Decent "Bluewater Boat" List
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Old 17-08-2013, 08:57   #28
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

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Originally Posted by Andrew B. View Post
Pacific Seacraft 34' or 37'.

Go with a tiller so there's more room for dancing in the cockpit.

Watermaker for either. A good dingy might be nice, but not required.

It's your boat/book. Sail it anywhere you want to.
Chris sailed off the edge of the world and back.

If speed is the issue, fly.
thanks b,
This would be the boat a genius would want...
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Old 17-08-2013, 08:59   #29
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

DeeB, I apologize for calling you a troll, but without knowing about a previous thread or Meets and Greats, your opening post was so far fetched that I probably didnt get to the last paragraph before I assumed it was a wild ass dreamer. For your book, I will say that there are couples that have sailed all over the place without the wife standing watch or doing deck work, but that is still different than single handing. The Captain doesnt end up doing all of the off watch work (cooking, cleaning,keeping logs,etc) that a single hander would have to do. If that is how the couples relationship works, then so be it. If the relationship isnt a love thing, then dump the useless crew and get someone that will share the work evenly. I think that most wifes contribute to passages to what ever level that they feel comfortable. That doesnt have to mean foredeck work in the middle of the night, but can be anything that takes some of the work off of the captain. Anyway, good luck with your book. ______Grant.
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Old 17-08-2013, 09:01   #30
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Re: Choosing the Perfect Boat

You could also read the Keeping Watch topic.
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