Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 29-11-2005, 19:26   #76
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
You got it! Lowering the colors was the accepted method of surrender. Nailing the colors to the mast (quite literally) was to prevent surrender, and more importantly make the statement that victory or death were the only options.
As for the nails, I will accept the correction with one caviat. Me great grandmother was Irish. As she told it, the men used to make business deals in the pub. by the bar there was an iron nail. the tradition left that payment was to be put on the nail until the deal was done. If the tradition started in Bristol, So be it.
__________________

__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2005, 21:49   #77
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Cleveland Ohio
Boat: Irwin 37 Tom's Foolery
Posts: 3
ship hi in transit

is a myth. But it sounds good.
__________________

__________________
tho52mas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 11:26   #78
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sapulpa, OK
Posts: 34
"The Bitter End". I know what it means but where did it come from?
__________________
Matt Hager
sv "Vagans"
Matt Hager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 11:52   #79
Registered User
 
sv_makai's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Currently, cruise is over and back in Solomons MD, USA
Boat: Voyage/Maxim 380 - Makai
Posts: 543
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to sv_makai
not sure but

When letting out the anchor rhode and you see the end go overboard, you will proabably be very bitter.....
__________________
Captain Bil formerly of sv Makai -- KI4TMM
The hunt for the next boat begins.
http://www.sv-makai.com
sv_makai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 12:07   #80
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
The 'Bitter End' might be an expression describing the end of a cable attached to the "bit".

The OED provides this citation, "1867 Smyth Sailor's Word-bk. 103 A ship is 'brought up to a bitter' when the cable is allowed to run out to that stop. When a chain or rope is paid out to the bitter-end, no more remains to be let go..."
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 18:17   #81
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
The way this thread has snowballed, forgive me if I am repeating one.
Howabout "Starboard"?
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 20:07   #82
Registered User
 
BC Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Gabriola BC
Boat: Viking 33 Tanzer 8.5m Tanzer 22
Posts: 1,034
Images: 5
Starboard

A lady had a rooming house. On the left lived a hooker, on the right lived a nice clean cut teacher who paid the rent on time. So the Starboarder lived on the right.
Michael
__________________
BC Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2005, 20:30   #83
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Well, on our first boat, the galley was on the left side, and I told my wife that is where the port is kept, leaving the other side as starboard. To this day, she gets confused on boats with the galley on the starboard side.
But...I think I am after something a bit more nautical.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 01:40   #84
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
There are two stories to the Port and Starboard side of vessels. This particular Port one maybe a little more like the Brass monkey tale. But I like it. In this tale, port was indeed determind by which side the Alchohol was kept on. In the very early days of english sailing, many of the sailors were not running off to join a sailing life. You know, see the world, meet lots of interesting people, yadda yadda. For a Captain to gain a crew, it was often a case of getting men drunk, and knocking them out and dragging them to a ship. They would wake up the next morning and be slightly out of swimming distance from the sight of land. Of course, education was rather on the light side, and many couldn't even tell their left hand from their right. So to teach men that had limited knowledge, terms that they could easily understand, names were given to things on the boat that made it hard to get it wrong when the chips were down. Hence a line tied to a sail being called a sheet.
Anyway's, on with the port story. By the way, for the right hand of the boat, the word starboard was not the original term. I will come back to that one unless someone wants to jump in, feel free.
On the left side was were the barrels of port for the men were kept. Pretty easy to place that one to memory. Turn to port Helm. Port??... um???... booze!!... oh yeah! turning to port Capt.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 12:32   #85
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Out there doin' it
Boat: 47' Olympic Adventure
Posts: 2,634
starboard

I've heard a couple of versions:
1) In days of old the ship's rudder was more like an oar and generally on the right hand side of the boat - this was the "steer board". So as not to damage said rudder boats would be put port side to the jetty and the port or door was positioned on that side accordingly. This was the lading side or lade-board (larboard) side.
2) I don't speak Italian, so if anyone wants to refute this, feel free, but the terms starboard and larboard come from "sta borda" (this side) and "la borda" (that side). Don't know whether port had to do with doors or drink then.
But sort of on the topic - where does "posh" come from?

Kevin
__________________
Lodesman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 12:40   #86
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
Port Out Starboard Home (from Brittain to N. America) to be on the sunny Southern exposure both ways.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 15:03   #87
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Out there doin' it
Boat: 47' Olympic Adventure
Posts: 2,634
posh

That's the version I've heard Gord.
__________________
Lodesman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 17:10   #88
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,003
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Starboard does come from the steering oar as seen on viking ships and early Mediterranean boats. By custom, the steering oar was on the right hand side of the boat.

Port seems to have been adopted relatively recently, like in the 19th century. At least as late as the Napoleanic wars, the left side of the ship was called Larboard in the British Navy. I heard they changed to port because of confusion in shouted commands. Easy to mistake star and lar on a wild and stormy deck.

Aloha
Peter O.
__________________
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 19:15   #89
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Roverhi, you are the closest. Vikings refered to the sides of a ship as the Board. The steering oar (or "star") was located on the Rt side of the vessel, hence the term, starboard. This also gave name to the "lar board" side of the ship. I believe you are laso correct about the reasoning behind the term port, but am not sure on that one.
Although my personal experience does give some credence to Wheels' definition.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2005, 14:28   #90
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 69
Quote:
GordMay once whispered in the wind:
Port Out Starboard Home (from Brittain to N. America) to be on the sunny Southern exposure both ways.
I heard similar but that it was for the Britain to India voyages (post-Suez Canal,, but pre-air conditioning). P.O.S.H. meant you were on the shady side of the ship both ways so your stateroom stayed cooler.
__________________

__________________
nolatom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Benefits of eating Fish... GordMay Provisioning: Food & Drink 6 05-12-2004 13:26



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 22:02.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.