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Old 28-04-2015, 17:33   #121
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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I don't care and it doesn't matter to me, if you like it go get one! But to me it is just a small old boat that would make an uncomfortable cruiser.

It's as simple as that.
Well, as long as you are comfortable I'm happy for you, but I'd take an uncomfortable boat like the S&S 34 or the Swan 36 for when the weather decided to kick up a bit.

Have you looked at sailboatdata on the Hunter 410? I'm glad it's comfortable at least.

But if you are just sailing across bays and creeks to the next marina on crystal clear sunny days, your comfortable boat should be just fine.
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:39   #122
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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Well, as long as you are comfortable I'm happy for you, but I'd take an uncomfortable boat like the S&S 34 or the Swan 36 for when the weather decided to kick up a bit.

But if you are just sailing across bays and creeks to the next marina on crystal clear sunny days, your comfortable boat should be just fine.
That's great, I'll still be comfortable when those start throwing you around plus all the other times!

BTW - just how many trips have you made in those boats "when the weather decided to kick up"?
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:39   #123
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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I don't care and it doesn't matter to me, if you like it go get one! But to me it is just a small old boat that would make an uncomfortable cruiser.

It's as simple as that.
You have a nice looking boat Sailorboy.

I am looking for a Hunter 37 Cherubini, more my price range.
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:44   #124
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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Compare this "old boat" to some of the newer ones, and I think you will find this boat is way better for offshore sailing and much more seaworthy than most any of the newer designs.

It's all there in your book. You are just upsetting folks that didn't read the book before they made their purchase.

It's an S&S 34.

S&S 34 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
Damn, the ends on that thing are even more pinched than my boat... Hell, you'd have to be positively suicidal to venture offshore in something like that...

Or, perhaps just Australian...

:-)

Jon Sanders - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Old 28-04-2015, 17:45   #125
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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That's great, I'll still be comfortable when those start throwing you around plus all the other times!

BTW - just how many trips have you made in those boats "when the weather decided to kick up"?
I was usually on a catamaran when the weather kicked up. Either a Hobie 16, Nacra 6.0, or Nacra F-17. I've sailed many regattas in and around Pensacola, Ft Walton Beach, Mississippi, and Tennessee but never did the Dauphin Island Race

I did that for 14 years and about 8-10 months out of the year for 10 years while in Florida.

You sail through or around lots of storms when you sail that much. I was very lucky not to have been in one like happened in the latest Dauphin Island race although my son was as I watch with binoculars as he sailed his Hobie 16 across Pensacola Bay at 15 years old with a 12 and 14 year old as crew.

This is the reason I like boats with ballast. When you are on a 300lb catamaran with as much sail as my 6600lb Bristol 27, you come to appreciate ballast since all you have on racing beach cats is your own ass and your crew.
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:51   #126
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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Damn, the ends on that thing are even more pinched than my boat... Hell, you'd have to be positively suicidal to venture offshore in something like that...
Maybe, but some young lady recently sailed RTW on one. Could be somebody wanted her on a decent boat


http://www.jessicawatson.com.au/pink-lady
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:51   #127
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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LOL, maybe!

That boat has one heck of a bal/disp ratio. Should be kinda stiff!
When will folks understand that ballast ratio has no relation to stiffness, unballasted multihulls have more stiffness than any monohull dangling half a cathedral roof off it's bottom.OR< put a heavy lead keel on a barrel and it is still going to be 'tippy'. Ballast has no effect until the boat has heeled over and it can exert some leverage.

But I agree, the S&S 34 is a nice boat, it was actually pretty much a race boat ( or even a racy pretty boat) originally, see "Morning Cloud' the British PM's (Ted heath's) boat that he won the Sydney to Hobart race in . At the time it would have been thought 'much too racy for proper offshore cruising or blue water' But heck it was compensated by having a good skipper and crew.
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:55   #128
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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You have a nice looking boat Sailorboy.
Sure it looks good, just don't look at it on the sailboatdata website
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:55   #129
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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Maybe, but someone recently sailed RTW on one.
As did Shane Acton in 'Shrimpy' a 19ft plywood Caprice ( google it, buy the book too and wonder....)
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Old 28-04-2015, 17:55   #130
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

One of the chapters of that book IIRC has to do with design down below. While much of this discussion has had to do with hulls & rigging, it is important to note that some more "traditional" interiors, perhaps not found on newer boats, tend to be suggested as another important "characteristic."

Nigel Calder's Cruisers Handbook covers much the same ground, and, quite frankly, his assessments are pretty much the same his book is 25 years newer!
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Old 28-04-2015, 18:07   #131
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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Maybe, but some young lady recently sailed RTW on one. Could be somebody wanted her on a decent boat


Ella's Pink Lady
Uhhh, I can only presume you didn't notice any of the links I provided?

Proof positive, I suppose, that it's the cute young chicks that get all the glory, these days...

:-)
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Old 28-04-2015, 18:09   #132
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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When will folks understand that ballast ratio has no relation to stiffness, unballasted multihulls have more stiffness than any monohull dangling half a cathedral roof off it's bottom.OR< put a heavy lead keel on a barrel and it is still going to be 'tippy'. Ballast has no effect until the boat has heeled over and it can exert some leverage.
But that is what we are talking about no? Tilt me over and I get more and more resistant to further tipping? Lots of weight as far down as you can get it. No other reason to have all that weight down there.

So a wide beam (with flat bottom) resists tipping initially. But then when it does start to tip...

And of course a multihull is stiffer, it is a wide plank. Hard to tip at all, but it can happen. And if it does tip over, you better have an emergency beacon with a good battery.
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Old 28-04-2015, 21:32   #133
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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But that is what we are talking about no? Tilt me over and I get more and more resistant to further tipping? Lots of weight as far down as you can get it. No other reason to have all that weight down there.**
So a wide beam (with flat bottom) resists tipping initially. But then when it does start to tip...

And of course a multihull is stiffer, it is a wide plank. Hard to tip at all, but it can happen. And if it does tip over, you better have an emergency beacon with a good battery.
**Until it reaches the point of no return and goes totally tits up and for those who want to sail by numbers this is called the AVS (angle of vanishing stability)



WIND alone doesn't turn boats over either, except maybe to flip racing dinghies and multihulls, but WAVES DO and a ton of extra ballast underneath a hull makes no difference to that. What helps boats right themselves again is the buoyancy in the upperworks that makes the boat Unstable upside down and encourages it to get back tits down. If you simply add a ton of extra ballast underneath, you will need to beef up the hull and it's rigging to support it too.
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Old 28-04-2015, 21:47   #134
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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**Until it reaches the point of no return and goes totally tits up and for those who want to sail by numbers this is called the AVS (angle of vanishing stability)



WIND alone doesn't turn boats over either, except maybe to flip racing dinghies and multihulls, but WAVES DO and a ton of extra ballast underneath a hull makes no difference to that. What helps boats right themselves again is the buoyancy in the upperworks that makes the boat Unstable upside down and encourages it to get back tits down. If you simply add a ton of extra ballast underneath, you will need to beef up the hull and it's rigging to support it too.
And if your angle of vanishing stability is where the mast is in the water then a lot of wind (almost always accompanied by waves) will do exactly that, knocks you down and the "vanishing stability" takes over. The angle of vanishing stability is determined by ballast / depth and hull shape, no?
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Old 28-04-2015, 22:39   #135
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Re: Characteristics of Offshore Yachts

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WIND alone doesn't turn boats over either, except maybe to flip racing dinghies and multihulls
And what multihull is in the same price range as above mentioned SS34? Not even close I'm afraid, and if there were one it's not for offshore for sure. And I'm not comfortable with stiff
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