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Old 09-06-2016, 21:07   #106
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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Originally Posted by NoQuarter79 View Post
We took her out for a sail today, and it was magnificent. We made the right decision, and we are very happy with how this boat is shaping up. I will definitely post updates, and I am sure I will post plenty of questions as well. We got a really good deal on this boat!
BINGO.

Congratulations. Hope some of this helped. Other than the Sociology 101 crap, that is.

If it works, use it. If it doesn't, learn how to fix it.

Sounds like you got a great start.

Keep up the good work.

All the best.

Nice boat.
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Old 09-06-2016, 21:23   #107
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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Don't listen to this guy. (Plus, college takes too long to learn a job skill. I have a BA and haven't made a penny on it except the money I was paid to go!)
By any chance, was your major Interpretive Dance?

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Old 09-06-2016, 22:12   #108
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Re: Buying a donated boat

Now that the boat issues have been put to bed, at least for the nonce, I'll pipe up with an alternative opinion about the needs for university education. For some folks, some intellects, some social aptitudes, some cultural backgrounds, college and university paths work brilliantly, and can indeed lead to remunerative occupations. But that is not the only path that can lead to a successful life and a adequate income. In particular, acquisition of a skilled trade (there are so many, but mechanic, machinist, electrician, cabinet maker, even shipwright) can lead to a very adequate income and a satisfying career. And none of those require a college degree of any sort. Training, yes, but without all the trappings of a normal BA or BS degree. In some areas the apprenticeship route is still practiced, and IMO is a great route for some to follow.

All the pontificating re college being the only route only reflects what worked for the one pontificating... and often their life experiences do not include direct experience of work in the sort of fields that I envision Having sat behind a desk or in a cubicle for too many years, they can't imagine that someone who works with their hands can have a good life. I think that they can.

I speak thus having come from an academic family, having had the privilege of attending three of the great universities of t he world (U of Chicago, Stanford and UC Berkely) and having had a career as a physicist. Along the way, I worked as a mechanic, as a machinist, as a welder and as various sorts of lab techs, to say nothing of summer jobs in the steel mills in Gary Indiana. I learned to respect blue collar workers, not to despise them, and have found that many such folks do indeed live satisfying and productive lives.

One other thing I learned: it is kinda bad form to tell someone how to live their life... it is hard enough to figure out how to live your own!

Descending from soap box, dodging flying tomatoes...

Jim
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Old 09-06-2016, 22:23   #109
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Now that the boat issues have been put to bed, at least for the nonce, I'll pipe up with an alternative opinion about the needs for university education. For some folks, some intellects, some social aptitudes, some cultural backgrounds, college and university paths work brilliantly, and can indeed lead to remunerative occupations. But that is not the only path that can lead to a successful life and a adequate income. In particular, acquisition of a skilled trade (there are so many, but mechanic, machinist, electrician, cabinet maker, even shipwright) can lead to a very adequate income and a satisfying career. And none of those require a college degree of any sort. Training, yes, but without all the trappings of a normal BA or BS degree. In some areas the apprenticeship route is still practiced, and IMO is a great route for some to follow.

All the pontificating re college being the only route only reflects what worked for the one pontificating... and often their life experiences do not include direct experience of work in the sort of fields that I envision Having sat behind a desk or in a cubicle for too many years, they can't imagine that someone who works with their hands can have a good life. I think that they can.

I speak thus having come from an academic family, having had the privilege of attending three of the great universities of t he world (U of Chicago, Stanford and UC Berkely) and having had a career as a physicist. Along the way, I worked as a mechanic, as a machinist, as a welder and as various sorts of lab techs, to say nothing of summer jobs in the steel mills in Gary Indiana. I learned to respect blue collar workers, not to despise them, and have found that many such folks do indeed live satisfying and productive lives.

One other thing I learned: it is kinda bad form to tell someone how to live their life... it is hard enough to figure out how to live your own!

Descending from soap box, dodging flying tomatoes...

Jim

Exactly!
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Old 09-06-2016, 22:28   #110
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Re: Buying a donated boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Now that the boat issues have been put to bed, at least for the nonce, I'll pipe up with an alternative opinion about the needs for university education. For some folks, some intellects, some social aptitudes, some cultural backgrounds, college and university paths work brilliantly, and can indeed lead to remunerative occupations. But that is not the only path that can lead to a successful life and a adequate income. In particular, acquisition of a skilled trade (there are so many, but mechanic, machinist, electrician, cabinet maker, even shipwright) can lead to a very adequate income and a satisfying career. And none of those require a college degree of any sort. Training, yes, but without all the trappings of a normal BA or BS degree. In some areas the apprenticeship route is still practiced, and IMO is a great route for some to follow.

All the pontificating re college being the only route only reflects what worked for the one pontificating... and often their life experiences do not include direct experience of work in the sort of fields that I envision Having sat behind a desk or in a cubicle for too many years, they can't imagine that someone who works with their hands can have a good life. I think that they can.

I speak thus having come from an academic family, having had the privilege of attending three of the great universities of t he world (U of Chicago, Stanford and UC Berkely) and having had a career as a physicist. Along the way, I worked as a mechanic, as a machinist, as a welder and as various sorts of lab techs, to say nothing of summer jobs in the steel mills in Gary Indiana. I learned to respect blue collar workers, not to despise them, and have found that many such folks do indeed live satisfying and productive lives.

One other thing I learned: it is kinda bad form to tell someone how to live their life... it is hard enough to figure out how to live your own!

Descending from soap box, dodging flying tomatoes...

Jim
+1 for a reasoned comment.
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Old 09-06-2016, 23:14   #111
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Re: Buying a donated boat

I've known PHD holders with $150k+ student loans to pay of that were stuck flipping burgers to survive...

If there is no demand for people with the degree you hold... its a nice decoration for the wall that comes with a HUGE debt.

Then there's the guy I know who never went to college or trade school but owns a multi-million dollar a year PROFIT business...

Sorry... the "sheepskin" may be a bad investment. Colleges/Universities want everyone to think that you can't get a job without their blessing, but its just not true.
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Old 09-06-2016, 23:40   #112
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Re: Buying a donated boat

The best shipmate I ever had was a tradesman. Of course you don't need a college degree to be successful, as stated earlier. But this thread is about a couple who has more boat than they can afford. Either increase your earning capacity or reduce your boat size. A couple can have a lot of fun in a Y Flyer. But it's no fun to own a boat you can't afford.

Paul
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Old 09-06-2016, 23:47   #113
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Re: Buying a donated boat

I had a friend in the Navy... He bought a junky used 32 ft sailboat and moved himself and family in because it was cheaper to rehab the boat (paying slip fee) than rent an apartment...
Turned out to be a very good decision, because after rehab he sold the boat at a modest profit.
But he'd also saved an average of $300 a month vs renting an apartment, AFTER counting all the money put into the boat as a loss. He ended up with a nice down payment for a house.
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:18   #114
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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He ended up with a nice down payment for a house.
What a silly thing to do at that point. Shoulda bought another baot!!

Jim
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:28   #115
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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By any chance, was your major Interpretive Dance?

Paul
No, electronics, radar, antennas, computers, etc.......in the military. All related to aviation radar/IFF. (now flight simulators) Almost nonstop boring techie schools for 6 years. (8 hours per day for 3 years) Plus surveying to setup the reflectors and radar offset on the quick built runways

Then Computer Science and Math in college (GI Bill) until I grew tired of it then majored in History which I really enjoyed plus lots of other liberal arts stuff and Logic in the Philosophy department. Also astronomy.
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:10   #116
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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Originally Posted by NoQuarter79 View Post
We took her out for a sail today, and it was magnificent. We made the right decision, and we are very happy with how this boat is shaping up. I will definitely post updates, and I am sure I will post plenty of questions as well. We got a really good deal on this boat!
Well, got me beat. I sat at work indoors.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:12   #117
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Now that the boat issues have been put to bed, at least for the nonce, I'll pipe up with an alternative opinion about the needs for university education. For some folks, some intellects, some social aptitudes, some cultural backgrounds, college and university paths work brilliantly, and can indeed lead to remunerative occupations. But that is not the only path that can lead to a successful life and a adequate income. In particular, acquisition of a skilled trade (there are so many, but mechanic, machinist, electrician, cabinet maker, even shipwright) can lead to a very adequate income and a satisfying career. And none of those require a college degree of any sort. Training, yes, but without all the trappings of a normal BA or BS degree. In some areas the apprenticeship route is still practiced, and IMO is a great route for some to follow.

All the pontificating re college being the only route only reflects what worked for the one pontificating... and often their life experiences do not include direct experience of work in the sort of fields that I envision Having sat behind a desk or in a cubicle for too many years, they can't imagine that someone who works with their hands can have a good life. I think that they can.

I speak thus having come from an academic family, having had the privilege of attending three of the great universities of t he world (U of Chicago, Stanford and UC Berkely) and having had a career as a physicist. Along the way, I worked as a mechanic, as a machinist, as a welder and as various sorts of lab techs, to say nothing of summer jobs in the steel mills in Gary Indiana. I learned to respect blue collar workers, not to despise them, and have found that many such folks do indeed live satisfying and productive lives.

One other thing I learned: it is kinda bad form to tell someone how to live their life... it is hard enough to figure out how to live your own!

Descending from soap box, dodging flying tomatoes...

Jim
Jim, you have it right. Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:17   #118
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Re: Buying a donated boat

I had a college education and had a great career. My son has a college education and has squat - no job, no money.

I studied building engineering. His degree is in sociology.

OTOH, there are many folks with his degree who have good careers. I'd bet there are some engineering graduates who have nothing, too.

It's all about the people. The individuals. Jim Cate's right.

Generalizations make little sense.

Let's get back to boating.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:23   #119
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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You asked for advice...from now on, I'll keep my mouth shut, I promise!

Paul
They asked for boat advice not a critique of their life.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:52   #120
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Re: Buying a donated boat

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I've known PHD holders with $150k+ student loans to pay of that were stuck flipping burgers to survive...

If there is no demand for people with the degree you hold... its a nice decoration for the wall that comes with a HUGE debt.

Then there's the guy I know who never went to college or trade school but owns a multi-million dollar a year PROFIT business...

Sorry... the "sheepskin" may be a bad investment. Colleges/Universities want everyone to think that you can't get a job without their blessing, but its just not true.
I worked with a guy, I kind of considered an old sage. I asked about which college he was sending his son to. His answer was, " He is going to a trade school, anyone with a trade can always find a job," Now that was 45 yrs. ago and I think his answer has come become of age.
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