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Old 09-09-2010, 06:29   #31
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Location: Westport Point, MA
Boat: 1973 Viking 33
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That Vanguard looks beautiful, great price too. We are looking for somethng a little faster though. I'm leaning seriously toward the Irwin. I seem very solid and stillhas original gelcoat. Does anyone have a purchase and sails form they would be willing to share? Or could you maybe help me devise one? I know I will make it contingent on a survey. I know also I will have to pay to have the mast stepped and the boat launched for a complete survey and am more than happy to do so. I guess a $1000.00 investment now is better than buying the boat and ending up with a huge bathtub that I'll need to, then, pay to get rid of after running up storage fees....and whatever else. Anyway, I think I'm going to make an offer so, any advise in that department will be greatly appreciated. I'm also going to call the yacht club where it is currently stored to make sure there are no fees owed to them. Hopefully they can shed some more light on the boat.

Danny
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:17   #32
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Also, If anyone could recommend a good boat survey service in the Narragansett Bay area it would be a great help. Otherwise I'm just having to do an internet search for someone.
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:35   #33
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Also, If anyone could recommend a good boat survey service in the Narragansett Bay area it would be a great help. Otherwise I'm just having to do an internet search for someone.
Call Adrian Johnson at 860-235-2990. He is very, very good and can do an engine survey (assuming it's not some weird engine) as well as the hull, etc. Personally I think an Irwin is usually not a good choice but if the boat is in good shape and passes Adrian's survey, why not?
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:45   #34
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oooh, you'll have to tell me why an Irwin is not a good choice.
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:58   #35
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I've never owned, or sailed on an Irwin, but I have heard that a lot of the boats from Irwin were of questionable build quality. I also know there are a lot of satisfied Irwin owners out there, so maybe what I've heard is inaccurate. But I've heard the negatives often enough to put the brand name pretty low on my list.

And I once looked at one as a possible purchase that was in horrible shape so that has certainly biased my judgement.

Adrian would be a much better judge than I am because he has probably surveyed some Irwins.
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Old 09-09-2010, 18:47   #36
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What is a fast time to sail from..

Los Angeles Harbor to New York, is 3 months enough time for an inexperienced crew to sail a 30'Columbia and is the 72' as seaworthy as everyone says? 15k lbs. 10' beam not sure about the draft but it sits up very high out of the water. How much money should one bring?
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Old 09-09-2010, 19:01   #37
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Los Angeles Harbor to New York, is 3 months enough time for an inexperienced crew to sail a 30'Columbia and is the 72' as seaworthy as everyone says? 15k lbs. 10' beam not sure about the draft but it sits up very high out of the water. How much money should one bring?
I hope you don't think I'm being rude, but an inexperienced crew should not attempt such a trip. Not in a Columbia 30 or any other boat.

Sail that boat in Socal for a while to get some experience, and then try heading down to Baja for a cruise or two, and then see if you still want to try longer voyages.
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Old 09-09-2010, 19:25   #38
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Originally Posted by foggysail View Post


Sure, somebody will come back telling aobut travelling the world for the last 50 years in a 30' or smaller boat. But again my advice is think bigger, 33 or even a 36. Get one that someone LOVED AND CARED FOR and added amenities such as up to date electronics with radar.

Been there, done that and these are just my thoughts!

Foggy
Like Eric and Susan Hiscock f'rinstance?

Get the boat that fits you...coulda had an Albin Vega but would up with a
Tanzer 28...because my wife is claustrophobic and like the cabin better..

Just know what you;re getting into with and older boat..look beyond cosmetics..you can fix that stuff when you are bored..I wholeheartedly concur with getting an older boat which has been loved and cared for..ours is a bit run down, but I can tell her first owner was a gifted bluewater sailor...it shows in the little things..
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Old 10-09-2010, 03:14   #39
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Gents,

I am new in the forum and also in the sailing area. I just started with with laser and 16 ft Catamarams, but I really want to go further. I would like to buy my first sail boat but not really know exactly where I should start in terms of size. I know this will depends on what I will want to do in the future. I want to navegate and explore basically on the Mediterranean sea.

if any could give me some advice I will really appreciate it.

Thanks
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Old 10-09-2010, 16:57   #40
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Boat: International Etchells USA 125 Black Magic, Santana 20 475 Ghost, Hobie 33 3100 Bruja, dinghies,
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Beth,
Most people would consider a passage by new sailors from Los Angeles to New York ambitious and risky for these reasons (all my opinion and of course there may be exceptions):

(1) Distance vs. time. 6000 sea miles in 90 days is a lot of ocean to cover in a 30 ft. boat whose hull speed is only about 6 knots in good conditions. But you won't have very good conditions most of the time, and the winds will be against you some of the time, so you might be traveling 7000 nm or more. And in a 30 footer, you probably won't have a big crew, and may have to reduce sail or seek port at night, so you may be lucky to cover 75 miles per day. And new sailors may not know how to optimize their voyage planning, weather routing, boat set-up, and sail trim to get the most performance out of the boat. So, even trying to sail day and night, you're already up against a tight schedule.

And will you feel up to sailing for days on end when it gets rough? Will you have enough fuel on board if the winds die for several days at a time? Or will the tight schedule force you to sail when conditions are against you and maybe hazardous? Tight schedules often pressure sailors into poor decisions.

As newer sailors, you might be less aware of which areas have more concerns in terms of hazards (weather, shoals, harbor entrances, security issues) and having to deal with hazards under time pressure is not at all good.

And that doesn't include an allowance for arranging passage through the Canal. You could lose a few days working with the agent, filling in forms, arranging for line handlers, arranging to spend a night in mid-transit and paying the penalties for not being able to do the passage in one day (depending on direction and speed), etc.

And does that allow you any time for sightseeing and appreciating other cultures? You'll be traveling through some gorgeous places. Why wouldn't you want to enjoy them? Why go to all the expense and risk and hassle of sailing for several thousand miles without taking time to appreciate the local sights, countries, languages, and cultures?

And that doesn't allow you provision for delays associated with breakdowns. Do you know the boat well enough to fix it yourself and will you have a complete set of common spares and consumables? Or will you be stuck in foreign ports waiting for replacement parts to be flown in and, you hope, not get stuck in customs?

If you're on a schedule or want to save money, trucking the boat would be far cheaper. Sure, it may be many thousands of dollars, but the trip on water would also have huge expenses, plus lots of wear and tear on the boat and probably a fair number of boat systems needing repair on the way, along with such expenses as the Canal transit fees.
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