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Old 31-08-2010, 09:12   #16
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Okay I may be adding a 1980 Sabre 30 MKI to my look see list. Adelie, thanks for all the info and the list.
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Old 31-08-2010, 11:44   #17
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It sounds like the Lippincott, one of the Pearsons, and one of the Tartans are on the hard. Sometimes this just means that the owner got sick and can't sail anymore or some variation on losing interest. But in the New England area in the summer, a boat on the hard is most likely there because it needs a great deal of expensive work to be made sea worthy. I would steer clear of all of them.
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Old 31-08-2010, 12:17   #18
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I've come across a listing for a 1985 34' C.E. Ryder sea sprite for $29,500.00

this looks like a pretty sweet boat...little outta my price range, but....welll....it IS a buyers market. I could probably get somewhat of a price reduction. Any insights?...I'm all over the place but, I know I'm not going higher than 34'...My marina won't take anything longer than that!! LMAO
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Old 31-08-2010, 16:16   #19
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I've come across a listing for a 1985 34' C.E. Ryder sea sprite for $29,500.00

this looks like a pretty sweet boat...little outta my price range, but....welll....it IS a buyers market. I could probably get somewhat of a price reduction. Any insights?...I'm all over the place but, I know I'm not going higher than 34'...My marina won't take anything longer than that!! LMAO

Ya never know until you make an offer
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:45   #20
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okay so my list currently is down to 3 possibilites.

a 1980 pearson 32 with a a lot of little "bubbles" under the gel coat all over the hull. new 2 cylinder deisel

a 1976 Irwin 33 owned by the same guy for the last 25 years, selling cus he's moving to florida rebuilt 30 HP deisel

the 78 pearson 30 I mentioned before old atomic 4

a 1974 ericson 32 running 3 cyl deisel westerbeke

the Irwin is at top of the list right now. all boats seem very solid with little crazing.

would love any insights on any or all of these boats.

Danny
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:30   #21
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thirty feet is plenty

I think thirty feet is plenty big enough and we would all like to sail an Ocean 71, but whose got that kind of bread. One off my favouite boats that comes to mind is an Alberg 30. Very well built, bullet proof really and a very able sea worthy boat with many ocean crossings to their credit. A quick google search shows one avaiable in the chesepeke for 12,500. In this current state everything is negotable. I would use this economy though to go bigger if you can.
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:07   #22
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Originally Posted by sloopdogg View Post
okay so my list currently is down to 3 possibilites.

a 1980 pearson 32 with a a lot of little "bubbles" under the gel coat all over the hull. new 2 cylinder deisel

a 1976 Irwin 33 owned by the same guy for the last 25 years, selling cus he's moving to florida rebuilt 30 HP deisel

the 78 pearson 30 I mentioned before old atomic 4

a 1974 ericson 32 running 3 cyl deisel westerbeke

the Irwin is at top of the list right now. all boats seem very solid with little crazing.

would love any insights on any or all of these boats.

Danny
The bubbles are osmotic blisters (aka boat pox) needing repair. They are fixable. The likelyhood of them recurring depends on how you seal the underbody after repair and a bit of luck. They would be grounds for a price discount, possibly very steep depending on extent. If you are willing to do the work yourself, you could come out money ahead.
Luck.
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:35   #23
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what would be the general consensus of a 12 HP deisel pushing a 32 foot 12,000 lb boat be?
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Old 08-09-2010, 10:34   #24
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what would be the general consensus of a 12 HP deisel pushing a 32 foot 12,000 lb boat be?
You should be able to make hull speed no problem.
You probably will also make the old standard of being able to motor at 2kt into a 20knt wind with 2mi of fetch.

Your fuel economy throttling back to 4kt in a calm will probably be very very good, 12-15nm/gal.
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Old 08-09-2010, 13:10   #25
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You should be able to make hull speed no problem.
You probably will also make the old standard of being able to motor at 2kt into a 20knt wind with 2mi of fetch.

Your fuel economy throttling back to 4kt in a calm will probably be very very good, 12-15nm/gal.
I think making hull speed with "no problem" is a bit optimistic. I had no problem getting a 32 foot, 10,500 pounder to hull speed with a 13 hp older Volvo, in relatively calm conditions, but with another 1500 pounds dry weight, I don't know. I do agree with your fuel economy comment.

And most would consider that size boat with that kind of engine underpowered (for coastal cruising anyway), which means hard to sell when that time comes.

Is that "old standard" really adequate? If you have a knot or two of adverse current, you are making no headway.
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Old 08-09-2010, 15:09   #26
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This is what I'd recommend: 1966 Pearson Vanguard Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 08-09-2010, 16:23   #27
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SSSHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!

I've been considering that one! I've fallen in love with the Vanguards, but I like the B plan layout better. What they've done with this one (below) in Maryland is amazing:

1965 Pearson Vanguard Yawl Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 08-09-2010, 22:45   #28
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I think making hull speed with "no problem" is a bit optimistic. I had no problem getting a 32 foot, 10,500 pounder to hull speed with a 13 hp older Volvo, in relatively calm conditions, but with another 1500 pounds dry weight, I don't know. I do agree with your fuel economy comment.

And most would consider that size boat with that kind of engine underpowered (for coastal cruising anyway), which means hard to sell when that time comes.

Is that "old standard" really adequate? If you have a knot or two of adverse current, you are making no headway.
The rule of thumb I know of is that 1hp/1000lb will get you to hull speed. A poor hull shape, bottom condition and overhangs will affect this a bit up or a lot down.

The 'old standard' is old, as I indicated, 1950's or 60's and earlier. The circumstances of society, changes in the costs of things and general feelings about risk and safety have changed the standard.

In the 1950's, let's say, fuel was cheaper in the absolute sense, but not in the relative sense, adjusted for inflation fuel was $2 to 6.50/gal or more, depending on how inflation is reckoned.(http://www.measuringworth.com/calcul...mpare/2009.htm).
As a percentage of what people earned fuel was more costly.

My understanding is that food was too, which meant there was less disposable income, as a percentage of income, for fuel to begin with. Other things like housing I believe were cheaper. I don't have the energy to track down the info on food and housing, I am just remembering things I read long ago.

I believe engines were more expensive too skewing preferences towards smaller engines.

In the 1950's there were fewer people cruising both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of the population. I believe the people that did so tended to be more skilled as the barriers to entry were higher weeding out many of those who weren't as committed to the sport.

Today boat companies have 2 incentives to have the standard be higher, increased profits from selling larger engines and decreased liability from 'design defect' law suits where somebody has a need to motor into a hurricane at hull speed and can't.

Part of it too is that people think that faster motoring ability in adverse winds is safer.

To sum up, good marketing, increased disposable income, the general American tendancy to think bigger is better and cheaper recent energy prices and perhaps hardware prices have changed the standard.

Personally I like the old standard. I think the art of motor sailing is rather neglected these days, I consistently see people motoring in moderate air with no sails up. Ok they need to make tracks to get back to work the next day, but they could motor sail at hull speed for the fuel consumption of considerably less. In heavy air motor sailing is just about as fast but a lot more comfortable than motoring straight up wind. In most situations I can think of motor sailing with a smaller engine will be as effective as just motoring with a larger one.

There is a benefit of going with a smaller engine, for the same weight you can install a larger fuel tank. In calm conditions motoring, you can go slower without taking the motor out of its comfort zone, this increases fuel economy and therefore range even more.

I inclined to think there are more situations that I would get into where increased range would be important than situations where more power and marginally more speed would be important.
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Old 08-09-2010, 23:41   #29
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On the other hand diesels are now a lot lighter than they used to be which would be another reason engines got more power, no weight penalty to do so.
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Old 09-09-2010, 03:59   #30
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Morgan OI 30

We have a Morgan and while its solid, reliable and roomy it is slow. We sail in the area you describe and enjoy its shoal draft and comfort. No problem w insurance either even though its a 1977. The 27hp Yanmar is efficient and provides plenty of power.
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