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Old 22-08-2013, 06:39   #16
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

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Originally Posted by JK n Smitty View Post
Hey, everyone has there own personal preferences. Me, I would much rather be on the hook or a ball than in a trailer park........Jesse
So why are you in a trailer park?
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Old 22-08-2013, 06:57   #17
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

I think you will find that draft and mast height will become more of a limiting factor than dock availability. Once you get around the 50'+ mark, many (but not all) boats will draw more than 6 or 7 feet and have a mast height over 65'. If your mast is over 65', you can eliminate a large number of potential marinas because there is an ICW bridge that you can't clear. Are you planning to keep it in N. FL? There are only a handful of marinas in Jax, St. Aug, or Daytona that can accommodate a large sailboat. I keep mine in N. FL, and I chose it based on these factors. I wanted the biggest boat that was still manageable in this area. I ended up with a 46' Hylas with a 5' 9" draft, and a 64' mast. Finding a slip has not been a problem.
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Old 22-08-2013, 07:06   #18
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pirate Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

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Originally Posted by valhalla360 View Post
I agree that having the ability to anchor securely is a key skill among many and we do use it but when we come in somewhere where there is a free dock that is open, 95% of the cruisers gravitate to the free dock if they can get in.

You can make what aspersions you want about appropriate ways to cruise and it may be your preference but if you look at it statistically, I'll give you 10-1 odds if you take money out of the pitcure, the vast majority of cruisers will be in a well appointed marina.
I dunno if you can take money out of the picture. If you mean the po' folk are on moorings or anchors but would be in a slip if they could afford it, I'm sure you're correct but the rub is "appropriate ways to cruise," as you mention.

I've had years on moorings/slips when I had to work but between jobs and now that I'm not tied to a job, I like to keep on the move to actually fit at least my own version of a cruiser. Yearly/seasonal slip contracts don't fit that definition, at least not for a full time cruiser.

Examples are Rebel Heart and Zeehag who are on long distance cruises, even with Zee getting caught up with engine troubles. Doubtless there are many more but these two have kept us all informed of progress. Capt Force and I believe the Waterway Guy have set a high standard of cruising longevity with 40+ years (forty!) of essentially always being on the move.

For me, just living aboard isn't cruising. And nobody lives aboard for convenience.

More to the OP's question of how big one can handle. Bow thrusters make anything possible.
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Old 22-08-2013, 07:21   #19
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

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Originally Posted by Capt.Alex View Post
I think you will find that draft and mast height will become more of a limiting factor than dock availability. Once you get around the 50'+ mark, many (but not all) boats will draw more than 6 or 7 feet and have a mast height over 65'. If your mast is over 65', you can eliminate a large number of potential marinas because there is an ICW bridge that you can't clear. Are you planning to keep it in N. FL? There are only a handful of marinas in Jax, St. Aug, or Daytona that can accommodate a large sailboat. I keep mine in N. FL, and I chose it based on these factors. I wanted the biggest boat that was still manageable in this area. I ended up with a 46' Hylas with a 5' 9" draft, and a 64' mast. Finding a slip has not been a problem.
Yes, when we do purchase we will need to store her in the north Fl. area. Draft was another concern and from my research, you are correct that the larger boats tend to draft right at the 7' mark. This is definitely a concern as we will most likely start out cruising the Keys and the Bahamas. From my reading a 6' draft will be marginal in these areas and a 7' draft will be greatly limiting. Mast height is not as a great a concern as I was going to focus my search on a ketch but I would not have ruled out a sloop if the deal was right. So it is still a factor to consider.

If budget will allow we will probably end up on a 45' or 50' cat so width will be more of an issue and will necessitate a "T' pier to dock but I think the shallower draft and the more spacious accommodations will make living on the hook a bit more comfortable (gotta keep the Mrs. happy right?). If budget wont allow the cat then a nice big mono will be the goal. I am just trying to learn all I can so when the shopping starts I am well armed with information.

Tom
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Old 22-08-2013, 07:33   #20
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

Quote:
Originally Posted by JK n Smitty View Post
Hey, everyone has there own personal preferences. Me, I would much rather be on the hook or a ball than in a trailer park.

As I do with all things cruising, I typically go to Cap'n Fatty Goodlander as my guide: I believe that the ability to anchor is the bedrock skill of a cruising sailor. I've lived my whole life swinging to my own anchors.

Fair winds,

Jesse

Well, really ... trailer park? You must have been in some pretty shabby marinas!

Hook out if you want, but there's no point in insulting the people who like shore power and a real shower once in a while. Those who live on the hook are not superior to those who choose a marina. Living on the hook means you spend a lot more time doing ordinary, everyday things, which leaves less time for interesting ones. Like everything in sailing, it's a trade-off.

Before someone chooses a mooring over a marina, I suggest they consider dinking back and forth to do the laundry, grocery shopping, not to mention seeing friends. The reality is that once you've gone out to your boat at the end of the day, you're not likely to come in just to have a glass of wine with a friend. You miss out on all sorts of casual contacts with people, who given half a chance, might become a friend.

I think I have the best of both worlds, and I'm really glad I didn't have to dink in last Monday night in the storm we had to get to chorus rehearsal sopping wet.

In my marina, we have locked, coded gates. This means that I can sleep in my cockpit safely, something that as a single female I wouldn't want to do anchored out. We may hear from some female here who thinks that's safe, but I don't.

Another thing to think about is if you get sick or injured. I was very sick earlier this year and a neighbor brought me food (pretty nice, considering that he is apparently "trailer trash" like me!) Now I'm dealing with an injured back (yeah, it's been a bad year), and I'm glad I don't have to do all the exertion to dink in to see my doctor. In addition, my seedy little marina has not only a heated pool but a hot tub, and that hot tub has been my best friend the last 10 days or so.

Different strokes for different folks, and no need to get insulting about it.
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Old 22-08-2013, 09:18   #21
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Well, really ... trailer park? You must have been in some pretty shabby marinas!

Hook out if you want, but there's no point in insulting the people who like shore power and a real shower once in a while. Those who live on the hook are not superior to those who choose a marina. Living on the hook means you spend a lot more time doing ordinary, everyday things, which leaves less time for interesting ones. Like everything in sailing, it's a trade-off.

Before someone chooses a mooring over a marina, I suggest they consider dinking back and forth to do the laundry, grocery shopping, not to mention seeing friends. The reality is that once you've gone out to your boat at the end of the day, you're not likely to come in just to have a glass of wine with a friend. You miss out on all sorts of casual contacts with people, who given half a chance, might become a friend.

I think I have the best of both worlds, and I'm really glad I didn't have to dink in last Monday night in the storm we had to get to chorus rehearsal sopping wet.

In my marina, we have locked, coded gates. This means that I can sleep in my cockpit safely, something that as a single female I wouldn't want to do anchored out. We may hear from some female here who thinks that's safe, but I don't.

Another thing to think about is if you get sick or injured. I was very sick earlier this year and a neighbor brought me food (pretty nice, considering that he is apparently "trailer trash" like me!) Now I'm dealing with an injured back (yeah, it's been a bad year), and I'm glad I don't have to do all the exertion to dink in to see my doctor. In addition, my seedy little marina has not only a heated pool but a hot tub, and that hot tub has been my best friend the last 10 days or so.

Different strokes for different folks, and no need to get insulting about it.
Rakuflames. I'm with you on the marina. I don't mind roughing it from time to time but if I have the choice I want to be comfortable, especially while at my home port. I also have to consider the kids and my wife. I'm much more likely to do more sailing if she is at home and comfortable on the boat as much as possible. I'd like to save "roughing it" on the hook for areas with beautiful scenery and cool ocean breezes instead of wasting it in the brown water of the St. John's River.

Tom
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Old 22-08-2013, 09:28   #22
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

One thing to consider is that many marinas charge either the LOA or the length of the slip, whichever is greater. I have a 46' boat, and the few marinas I've found with 45' slips won't let me use one because I'll hang out, especially since I have davits. I've had the boat in three different SF bay marinas, and I've ended up paying for a 50' slip in each one.

A friend of mine with a 53' boat has to pay for a 60' slip. That's some serious money around here.
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Old 22-08-2013, 11:24   #23
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

If you are setting up a home port, seasonal or annual contracts start to make a lot of sense but even when you are on the move, don't forget to check on weekly or monthly rates. We've payed for a month and left after 2 weeks and it was still much cheaper than the daily rate.
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Old 22-08-2013, 21:37   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakuflames View Post

Well, really ... trailer park? You must have been in some pretty shabby marinas!

Hook out if you want, but there's no point in insulting the people who like shore power and a real shower once in a while. Those who live on the hook are not superior to those who choose a marina. Living on the hook means you spend a lot more time doing ordinary, everyday things, which leaves less time for interesting ones. Like everything in sailing, it's a trade-off.

Before someone chooses a mooring over a marina, I suggest they consider dinking back and forth to do the laundry, grocery shopping, not to mention seeing friends. The reality is that once you've gone out to your boat at the end of the day, you're not likely to come in just to have a glass of wine with a friend. You miss out on all sorts of casual contacts with people, who given half a chance, might become a friend.

I think I have the best of both worlds, and I'm really glad I didn't have to dink in last Monday night in the storm we had to get to chorus rehearsal sopping wet.

In my marina, we have locked, coded gates. This means that I can sleep in my cockpit safely, something that as a single female I wouldn't want to do anchored out. We may hear from some female here who thinks that's safe, but I don't.

Another thing to think about is if you get sick or injured. I was very sick earlier this year and a neighbor brought me food (pretty nice, considering that he is apparently "trailer trash" like me!) Now I'm dealing with an injured back (yeah, it's been a bad year), and I'm glad I don't have to do all the exertion to dink in to see my doctor. In addition, my seedy little marina has not only a heated pool but a hot tub, and that hot tub has been my best friend the last 10 days or so.

Different strokes for different folks, and no need to get insulting about it.
Look I was not intending to insult you personally but the reasons I and many others have this feeling about marinas is that for good or ill your neighbors are less than a few feet away and you have to deal with draconian rules.

There certainly are advantages to being at the dock but there are draw backs. It's great you like your situation and I would never look to force people to change. I was just relaying my opinion.
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Old 23-08-2013, 07:00   #25
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Re: Boat Size vs Slip Size

In home waters I'm in a cozy marina, state owned , and good value, home nearby with repairs and upgrades easy off a dock.When cruising I rarely use marinas as a matter of honor and finances; but with wife aboard , meeting crew, exploring or reprovisioning marinas have merit.

Being on a mooring or anchoring out entails quite a bit of extra gear: the dink ,and motor ,gas and oil,anchor and ,oars ,tow lines,life preservers ,a bailer,running lights,patch kits for inflatables ,davits or a system to haul all aboard and stow the tender on deck ( you don't tow your tender in all weathers do you?).All this loose impedimenta must have a home somewhere on the mother craft where space is always at a premium.

Given all the above ,spending a starry night away from land with someone special can be so magical that the extra effort and costs are offset.

Besides ,I like to pee over the side.

..............................Love you all........................mike
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Old 23-08-2013, 07:32   #26
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... Besides ,I like to pee over the side.

..............................Love you all........................mike


Peeing over the side ............ no question

Loving us all? ................ not possible

Mike, "Cheers" works, or "fair winds" or somesuch, even "dry bilges", but let's try to keep it real, OK? This is an international forum, not the Podunk, NY Baptist 4H club.

No offense to Baptists. Or Podunk, NY.
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