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Old 20-05-2009, 05:46   #1
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I think it might be helpful for the ever increasing Australian contingent to have a thread where issues concerning cruising Australian waters can be discussed. Could be helpful for visitors too!
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Old 20-05-2009, 05:54   #2
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One thing I have always wondered about is how do those in waters where there is a huge tidal range cope? Northern parts of Australia for example. Hobart's range is about 1.5 metres maximum so things like jetties, anchoring are no major concern.
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Old 20-05-2009, 06:45   #3
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Wouldn’t the “Pacific Ocean & the South China Sea” sub-forum under “Destinations” fit the bill?
http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f23/
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Old 20-05-2009, 06:55   #4
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Hi Gord - I wondered that too but most of that deals with places well away from Australia. There are plenty of issues around here from insurance and motors to tides and anchorages. Passage making West to East, South to North. Issues staying in Sydney Harbour - or any harbour! How good is the D'Entrecasteaux Channel for cruising? Etc Etc
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Old 20-05-2009, 08:48   #5
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“I have always wondered about is how do those in waters where there is a huge tidal range cope?”
These days there are marinas with locks. On the hook not a great problem, there are also some floating pontoons that cope with most of the tides. Along side a wharf some one needs to adjust the lines. This remind me that when the Navy came to port the sailors installed a floating pontoon at the wharf and all went back to the mother ship for the night. In the morning they where surprised to see their pontoon floating down the harbour with the tide, all ropes broken. They reinstalled the pontoon with much thicker ropes and all went back to the mother ship for the night. The next morning they where even more surprised to find there pontoon 3 meters up in the air still tied up to the wharf. After that they decided to leave some sailors to adjust the lines during the night . Even the Navy had to learn to deal with the big tide of the North.
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Old 21-05-2009, 19:41   #6
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Here on the west coast of Canada there aren't many places with more than 15 feet / 4.5 m of tide, and we usually set a piling, build a float, and put a metal strap around the piling so the float goes up and down with the tide but remains attached to the piling.

On the east coast I understand the tide range can be upwards of 30 feet / 9 m, and I haven't a clue how they'd deal with such a range other than to have very strong and tall pilings, probably connected at the top as well to keep the structure rigid.
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Old 21-05-2009, 19:57   #7
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Quote:
I think it might be helpful for the ever increasing Australian contingent to have a thread where issues concerning cruising Australian waters can be discussed.
I think we would welcome threads about any place in the world members might live in to help those that might end up there or those just starting sailing there. All places have peculiar issues that can seem quite strange to outsiders.

We have a bit more than a meter of tide and in a fixed slip with storm surges adding almost double it can be something less than obvious. Running aground at anchor will tend to make a sailor humble. Humility is a virtue everywhere and always serves well.
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Old 21-05-2009, 21:51   #8
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This remind me that when the Navy came to port the sailors installed a floating pontoon at the wharf and all went back to the mother ship for the night. In the morning they where surprised to see their pontoon floating down the harbour with the tide, all ropes broken. They reinstalled the pontoon with much thicker ropes and all went back to the mother ship for the night. The next morning they where even more surprised to find there pontoon 3 meters up in the air still tied up to the wharf.

Love this story - as I say we are fortunate in Southern Tasmania to only have to deal with 1.5 metres - but even then I've seen some boats 'hanging' at jetties - usually speed boat owners who have overstayed at the nearest watering hole!
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Old 21-05-2009, 22:12   #9
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Tidal Range

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Here on the west coast of Canada there aren't many places with more than 15 feet / 4.5 m of tide, and we usually set a piling, build a float, and put a metal strap around the piling so the float goes up and down with the tide but remains attached to the piling.

On the east coast I understand the tide range can be upwards of 30 feet / 9 m, and I haven't a clue how they'd deal with such a range other than to have very strong and tall pilings, probably connected at the top as well to keep the structure rigid.
I started my sailing in dinghies on the Tamar River in Northern Tasmania where the range was up to 4 metres. This resulted in strong currents - up to 6 knots but was a great advantage for locals in state and national events where 'reading the tides' was as important as 'reading' the wind!
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Old 22-05-2009, 00:49   #10
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It does seem that "Pacific Ocean and Souh China Seas" encompasses a fairly disproportionate chunk of the Earth's surface. There are a lot of Australian members.... but really, I ain't gonna lose any sleep either way.
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Old 22-05-2009, 00:55   #11
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In Alaska's Cook Inlet, we have tide ranges up to 28' during the year, and we have to be ever mind full of the state of tide. Most boats that fish and sail these waters, endeavor to use the tides to our advantage, especially with the cost of fuel being what it is.
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Old 22-05-2009, 02:43   #12
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So - you set your anchor at low tide and high tide it doesn't touch the bottom - or set it at high tide and at low tide the boat would wander all over the place. lol
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Old 24-05-2009, 04:16   #13
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In Darwin, often the multis will allow themselves to dry out at low tide. At Fanny Bay, there is a very long walk out to the boats anchored in water that doesn't. The Marinas all have locks.
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Old 24-05-2009, 05:58   #14
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Marinas with locks - now there's a concept!!!
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Old 04-08-2010, 16:19   #15
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I think it might be helpful for the ever increasing Australian contingent to have a thread where issues concerning cruising Australian waters can be discussed. Could be helpful for visitors too!
Portobello

Yes I agree, more writings about our Aussie Land. May not be as many snippets because of our population but they would be appreciated.

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