Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-11-2005, 11:56   #1
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
Attaching Jib Sheets

i was taught to attach sheets to headsails with a bowline. of course, back in the day, the sail was bagged and the sheets removed and stowed in a locker. with roller furling there is no need. there was a thread a while back about a guy getting caught in a blow and described going forward to "unsnap the jib". i did not know if this was local expression or if he was using snap shackles to attach his sheets - a good way, imo, to lose teeth. the boat we picked up this summer has one piece of line, folded at the center, poked thru the clew as a loop and then the two ends passed thru and each became a sheet. i did not change it this season. it never slipped and we saw good winds several times. i had planned to cut the line and revert to my old method, but thought i would ask - how do you attach your jib sheets ?

capt. lar
__________________

__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 12:16   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
I use a snap shackle on only the furling headsail sheet. When furled in, it is easy to release the sheet. You arent' placed in any danger of losing teeth when it is furled and you shouldn't be anywhere near the thing if it is flapping wildly anyway. Teeth wouldn't be my concern if that was happening. Looping it the way you have described is no better than tieing a knot. That may not be an issue, except that you lose a tremendouse amount of line strength in a knot than you would do if the line was spliced onto a shackle.
The bowline is still the best knot to use, especially for releaseafter it has been under strain.
__________________

__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 12:53   #3
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
i once had a furler crap out - bearings seized - could not furl - blowing hard (does anything ever fail in 10 kt breeze ?) and had the fun of going up and dropping the genoa. it was a friggin fight even on a 28 footer with a 150 genoa. i would not like to have a chunk of metal mixing in. the bowlines hurt !
capt. lar
__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 13:21   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,140
couple of bowlines making sure the smooth side of the knot is on the inside to prevent hanging up on the shrouds.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 13:53   #5
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
vasco - traditional guy. have you ever seen the method i described ?
__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 13:57   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,140
Yes, I've seen the single line method but usually on smaller boats, under 30 feet.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 14:14   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
delmarrey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Now in Blaine, WA
Boat: Modified Choate 40
Posts: 10,702
Images: 122
The method I prefer for roller furlings is the the use of one single line with the middle being the eye for the jib clew. By taking one end and passing it thru the line at the clew and then taking the other end and passing it thru again just behide the first. Then whip between the two cross overs. This has worked well for me on many differant boats.

Like this but both ends of equal length.

Also with roller furlings it is recommended that a couple wraps of the sheets should also go around the sail when stored. This helps to prevent the wind from opening up the clew in a storm.

As for the hank-ons I just do the bowline method. There's nothing worse then getting smacked with a chunk of metal when your trying to keep your balance. The clews are bad enough. I'd rather douse the thing in the water before taking a hit.
The trick I've used on the hank-ons is to head into the wind about 1 point, pull the clew as far back as possible and douse the genoa on the deck. As least most of it, the rest I can go forward and handle it down.
It's not a good racing manuver but single handing a 51' X 26' genoa, you don't have many choices..................._/)

__________________
delmarrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 14:47   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Quote:
Vasco once whispered in the wind:
couple of bowlines making sure the smooth side of the knot is on the inside to prevent hanging up on the shrouds.
I have the additional hang up on the inner forestay. I've always done it like Vasco. Hanging on the inner stay is a real problem when the air is on the light side. In big air it takes more than a knot to hang it up, but if you screw up a tack it can still happen. I've taken to adding a tacking line off a block attached to a fix downhaul off a pad eye on the bow lead back with a second set of furling blocks to the cockpit.. It prevents a trip to the bow to unstick the jib clew, but the downside is it's yet another line to tangle and deal with. On a short boat, the gap between the forestays isn't very big. It's the one PITA with a cutter rig. But I really like that little staysail when it gets nasty.

capt lar, I think the method you describe would actually work very well if you use some of the really high tech line like New England T-900 where often you can't untie the bowline and have to cut the sheet (bigger boats). Knots for the high tech lines don't work the same and you have to adjust.

I really would like something better but I'm not ready to use a shackle. I think they would hang up as well as a proeprly oriented bowline. I have a high clew so it is not possible to smack me.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 14:50   #9
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
I agree with most of the crowd. It's hard to beat a bowline for times when you have a roller furling incident, or for its line strength.

How, exactly, are people tying the sheet to the shackle?
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 14:55   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Cool

delmarrey,

For roller furlers I have short line with a monkey fist on one end and an eye splice on the other. You wrap it around and run the fist through the eye as insurance. You really don't want that jib unfurling. Wind, big sail, boat tied up is is clear disaster and a hefty yard bill.

It's a great thing to use on a lot of things. I secure the 3 part folding boarding ladder with one too. They never work loose and are easy to undo if you size the eye small enough to pass the fist it can't under tension pass back. They won't hold fast but they won't undo either. They look really nautical too.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 16:25   #11
Registered User
 
BC Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Gabriola BC
Boat: Viking 33 Tanzer 8.5m Tanzer 22
Posts: 1,034
Images: 5
Sheets

All my sheets are tied with a bowline.
Michael
__________________
BC Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 18:51   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Seattle area (Bremerton)
Boat: C&C Landfall 39 center cockpit "Anahita"
Posts: 1,076
Images: 6
Paul

I like the monkey fist idea, I'll have to try it to secure various items. It might beat the eye and toggle routine which can come loose under shaking.

I'm not sure about just how you use that on your furling: do you merely use it to secure the already furled rig or do you use it to attach the jib sheet?
__________________
Rick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 19:58   #13
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
During a race on a Wylie 37, we had an overide on the starboard primary. It was locked up tight, and no way to release. The foredeck crew was handed a line, secured into the bowline at the clew, and cut loose the jammed sheet. No way this would have worked with shackles or single line. I always use bowlines on my sheets. You can always head up if losing speed is not a factor, but single handing in the stink, I prefer not have more pieces to deal with.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 19:59   #14
Registered User
 
Wahoo Sails's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Marathon, Florida
Boat: Cape Dory 28, "Night Wind"
Posts: 353
Images: 16
I believe what Capt'n Lar is describing is a "Mobius splice" as described by Brian toss. This is what we use, lighter in weight and less likely to hangup than any other arrangement.

Bob & Lynn

L S/V Sew Good
__________________
Wahoo Sails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2005, 03:33   #15
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,596
Images: 240
I’m not familiar with the “Mobius Splice” - Is it similar, or the same as, a Brummell Tuck?

New England Splicing Guides: http://www.neropes.com/splice/default.htm
including:
Eye Splice - Brummell
http://www.neropes.com/splice/sp13_s...ye_brummel.htm
or
http://www.precourt.ca/splice/splice1.htm
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Attaching hardware to boom sjs Construction, Maintenance & Refit 9 07-08-2012 00:00
Jib Sheets JusDreaming Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 6 07-08-2010 13:32
Attaching Equipment Adaero Construction, Maintenance & Refit 4 30-08-2009 13:32
Jib Sheets DWT Other 12 04-02-2009 04:34
Help with determining the proper length and width and weight of the main, jib sheets Scintillating General Sailing Forum 2 12-06-2008 03:18



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:57.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.