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Old 05-11-2005, 06:01   #16
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Gord,
Illustration #11 is really all there is to it. No turning inside out or tucking etc. The "splice" is done in the middle of a single line with equal length tails.

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Old 05-11-2005, 09:31   #17
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I use a slightly different system, that works very well for me.
I was presented with a nice rope to replace a set of genoa sheets that were definitely past their sell by date. When I came to decide how to hold them on I discovered that the rope was actually kevlar cored with polyprop outside braid. Now kevlar does not like to go through too sharp an angle so my solution had to take this into account.

I decided that the lightest solution rather than a pair of bowlines was to create an eye at the centre of these sheets, and use a plastic thimble, then secure to the genoa via a captive pin shackle.

So, how to make the eye. I have seen it done with whipping twine, but have never been impressed with this solution. The splice I used is also a useful trick if you need the rope to remain at the standard diameter as close to the eye as possible (a normal splice does thicken the rope for some considerable distance from the eye) Right, so I formed the eye, and then used a fid to create a hole through one side of the rope. I passed the whole of the other side through this hole. I then made another hole in the same rope the first hole was made but abt 1-2" further away from the thimble, and passed the other side rope back through it Then all you need do is pull it all tight. It locks the rope into an eye very satisfactorily. If you are doing this as a quick and short eye splice in the end of the rope, you need to seal inner and outer cores together (not that easy with a kevlar rope) and/or whip over over the splice completely. This is also the easiest way to splice an old rope.
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Old 05-11-2005, 13:51   #18
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Are you refering to the Brummel splice that Delmarrey has posted the drawing to back a few posts??? There is also another cool splice I am trying to find out about. It's called the "Lock Brummel Splice" It was developed for the volvo/whitbred ocean race for spicing halyards while still fitted and could be done by the boy's sitting on the deck while underway.
Cover failure is the biggest threat to these new fandangled lines that are under such extreme loads. I guess most of us won't get to see some of these ropes and especially the loads. Actually the loads are so high, the biggest threats to the lines are from the tremendouse heat developed within the rope. And much of the technology is being put into materials for use as covers that can disapate this heat away from the inner core. Mirribella had to have all the outer covers removed from all the sheets becuase the loads where creating to much heat within the core. Heat is the biggest enemy to any off these high strength space age cores.
Actually, Samson currently have a rope that has a blend of high load fibres in a 12 plait, but the outer core is actually painted on.

Ummm, I don 't want to get too boring or sound tooo nerdish (maybe too late) but I won't go into what the different materials are, unless someone wants to know, just ask and I will happily get all nerdish for ya.
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Old 05-11-2005, 13:58   #19
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Instructions for a Locked Brummel here

and heres a Brummel splice:
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Old 05-11-2005, 17:59   #20
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Girth hitch

I think I prefer the simple girth hitch. It is simple and can be removed without a knife.

http://www.animatedknots.com/girth/i...e=LogoGrog.jpg

The bowline is only used by those of us who can't be bothered to splice the sheets to the clew or don't know how. Having that knot flailing in the wind is no softer than a shackle when hit in the face.
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Old 05-11-2005, 22:12   #21
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Sheets

Well I have read a few alternatives to the bowline and I am left wondering, how do you reef the headsail, how do you change headsails, how do you remove the sheet from one side, how do you change sheets with the sail still up. All these things seem easier to me if you tie bowlines.
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Old 06-11-2005, 03:52   #22
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Rick,

The eye and monkey fist is done with small 3 strand cord (could be anything). For the jib it is wrapped around after you furl it with a few jib wraps as normal, but then you wrap the short tie around about about shoulder level when standing in the foredeck. It just adds a bit more security on the furled jib in case wind tries to blow up under the furled edges. It's not tight like shock cord since the fist is loose hanging a few inches past the eye. On fabric it does not slide does the jib since it has about three or more wraps before being secured.
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Old 06-11-2005, 04:51   #23
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The key to the eye & monkey fist lashing, is making it long enough to have ”about three or more wraps before being secured.”(per Paul B.)
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Old 06-11-2005, 04:55   #24
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IMO the simplest and best answer for you is the “bowline on a bite”. This has the advantage of keeping your line in one piece and will not cinch down on the clew of your sale like a larkspur (the method you now describe).

If you are unfamiliar with this know, see it at http://knots.troop347.com/bowline_on_a_bite1.htm or other places on the net.

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Old 06-11-2005, 07:21   #25
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HUH???????

Mike, I fail to understand why one would change sheets while sailing. I have been sailing for the better part of 40 years and have never had to change a sheet underweigh. Reefing the sail for all who have roller furling would have no bearing of how the sheets are attached. Those who have hanked on sails would be best served with a snap shackle to facilitate headsail changes. The only disadvantage I can see to the girth hitch is if the sheet parts at the sail. There would be nothing attached, but that would assume that sailor has neglected maintenance and not inspected the sheets for chafe (if there is any).
I might go for a bowline on a bight if I did not have 45' lines to haggle with. It all comes down to a personal preference. My boat has sheets tied on with bowlines, but that was the dealers choice. When the sheets need changing, I will revert to the girth hitch.
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Old 09-11-2005, 20:43   #26
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We use bowlines and end for end on a regular basis to get more even wear. We have had sheets part that looked fine so I prefer two seperate sheets tied by bowlines. Girth hitches and Brummels are fine for smaller boats with minimum load but not a good way to go when getting into a larger boat.

My $.02
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Old 09-11-2005, 20:51   #27
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What Plaibis is describing, I think, is also known as a Dutch rope shackle. I used it on my boat and it worked great. Had the added benefit of not scarring up the woodwork on a tack because it's made of line not metal. Also, probably do less damage if it whacks you in the head.
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Old 09-11-2005, 21:45   #28
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Well now, that depends on the particular head being whacked, doesn't it?
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Old 09-11-2005, 22:03   #29
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Huh, changing sheets

Some headsails are hanked on and have reef points.
Not everyone has a roller furler or even prefers a roller furler.
When you reef the headsail and you use two sheets, you can remove one sheet and tie it in the higher clew, and than tack and lower all at the same time. Or you can use another sheet and do it on the same tack. I very rarely do this so can agree in general that the sheets are not changed. I just can not see the need for a shackle or a splice when there is a simple way to do it, and that is to tie the sheets on with bowlines. But that is the way I do it and everyone else can do it differently. I think the original question was how do we each individually do this, and it seemed there was no right or wrong answer.
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Old 10-11-2005, 07:28   #30
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The point of the thread was to ask what experienced sailors would call a most basic question - a good question from someone new to sailing, a question that would only have a couple of answers in most "learn to sail" books. Most of us learn to sail from a handful of older sailors. We are limited by their opinions and biases based on older methods and materials. There is never just one way, and some are better than others.

BC - manual reefing headsails - you old dog !
I think the same will be said for mainsails in another 20 years.

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