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View Poll Results: Are you 'Living the Dream' Now?
I am living the cruising dream wholly or substantially now 29 28.16%
Living the dream nearly, partially or in another manner 24 23.30%
Interrupted: earning Freedom Chips or other temporary interruption 9 8.74%
Not yet but going within 12 months 10 9.71%
Going within 5 years 18 17.48%
Going after 5 years or more 7 6.80%
Retired, returned, arrested, CLOD etc. 6 5.83%
Not going. Got other dreams! 0 0%
Voters: 103. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-11-2010, 08:08   #46
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Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
I pretty much associate with dave and Bash's experience. I love my work. My work is part of the dream.

.
So did I before I took off for a year. The problem with loving work is that it limits your view. You're enjoying it too much to contemplate anything else. I did not have a dream of going cruising. I did it because my wife and I liked sailing and a talk with friends at the club put the gears in motion. I outfitted the boat to go cruising. Once I did this I was leaving in September. The other two couple who had agreed to go with us did not. They hauled their boats that fall. But we did leave in September. My year off cruising completely changed my perspective.

When I returned I found myself in rush hour traffic, going to see a client, 16 lanes of cars going like a bat out of hell. I asked myself a few questions. Mainly why? Before my year off these questions would never have entered my mind. I would have been happy, driving along, thinking of my clients problems. Instead I was thinking of why I was doing this. That's what a year's cruising does to you. In my work life I chartered for three weeks every winter but that is not really long enough to alter your perspective. You have a good time, you come home to the work you still love and carry on. A year off leaves you with a totally different perspective. It changed my life. Work was no longer my love. My heart was no longer in it. And the thought of more money and more things seemed so silly. End of work life.
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Old 01-11-2010, 15:10   #47
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Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
So did I before I took off for a year. The problem with loving work is that it limits your view. You're enjoying it too much to contemplate anything else. I did not have a dream of going cruising. I did it because my wife and I liked sailing and a talk with friends at the club put the gears in motion. I outfitted the boat to go cruising. Once I did this I was leaving in September. The other two couple who had agreed to go with us did not. They hauled their boats that fall. But we did leave in September. My year off cruising completely changed my perspective.

When I returned I found myself in rush hour traffic, going to see a client, 16 lanes of cars going like a bat out of hell. I asked myself a few questions. Mainly why? Before my year off these questions would never have entered my mind. I would have been happy, driving along, thinking of my clients problems. Instead I was thinking of why I was doing this. That's what a year's cruising does to you. In my work life I chartered for three weeks every winter but that is not really long enough to alter your perspective. You have a good time, you come home to the work you still love and carry on. A year off leaves you with a totally different perspective. It changed my life. Work was no longer my love. My heart was no longer in it. And the thought of more money and more things seemed so silly. End of work life.

Very interesting.
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Old 01-11-2010, 15:16   #48
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Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
So did I before I took off for a year. The problem with loving work is that it limits your view. You're enjoying it too much to contemplate anything else. I did not have a dream of going cruising. I did it because my wife and I liked sailing and a talk with friends at the club put the gears in motion. I outfitted the boat to go cruising. Once I did this I was leaving in September. The other two couple who had agreed to go with us did not. They hauled their boats that fall. But we did leave in September. My year off cruising completely changed my perspective.

When I returned I found myself in rush hour traffic, going to see a client, 16 lanes of cars going like a bat out of hell. I asked myself a few questions. Mainly why? Before my year off these questions would never have entered my mind. I would have been happy, driving along, thinking of my clients problems. Instead I was thinking of why I was doing this. That's what a year's cruising does to you. In my work life I chartered for three weeks every winter but that is not really long enough to alter your perspective. You have a good time, you come home to the work you still love and carry on. A year off leaves you with a totally different perspective. It changed my life. Work was no longer my love. My heart was no longer in it. And the thought of more money and more things seemed so silly. End of work life.
I am grappling with the exact same scenario almost, I dont LOVE my work but rather the things it enables me to do.

Can I ask:
  1. How old were you (roughly) when you had this turnaround?
  2. Do you have children? If so how many and at what stage of education
  3. How financially secure were you?
  4. What do you do now with time work money etc?

Feel free to tell me it is none of my business, or PM me but your post really spoke to my issues

Thanks
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Old 01-11-2010, 15:51   #49
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I am grappling with the exact same scenario almost, I dont LOVE my work but rather the things it enables me to do.

Can I ask:
  1. How old were you (roughly) when you had this turnaround?
  2. Do you have children? If so how many and at what stage of education
  3. How financially secure were you?
  4. What do you do now with time work money etc?
Feel free to tell me it is none of my business, or PM me but your post really spoke to my issues

Thanks

Lots of us have those same issues.
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Old 01-11-2010, 16:21   #50
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We are partially living the dream right now, looking forward to making the final boat payment in 2 years, and then can start on the serious business of getting Echo ready for cruising the Gulf and beyond. We are living aboard her right now, and are sharpening our skillz out around the bay and outlying islands. I can't wait to cast off our lines and head out to Isla Mujares, which we have decided to make our first passage to!
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Old 01-11-2010, 16:23   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnathon123 View Post
  1. How old were you (roughly) when you had this turnaround?
  2. Do you have children? If so how many and at what stage of education
  3. How financially secure were you?
  4. What do you do now with time work money etc?

Feel free to tell me it is none of my business, or PM me but your post really spoke to my issues

Thanks
Jonathon,

I was 48.

I have two daughters. The youngest was in first year university. We paid her tuition, left her with the house, a car and $75 a week. She found out what things cost and how to live on a budget. The next two years she paid half her own tuition.

One is never financially secure. I came to the conclusion that I could work forever and it would not really change my life materially. The more you make the more you spend on unneeded things. I used to spend more on lunches and parking than I spend all week now.

I sail and play online poker, for fun chips only.
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Old 01-11-2010, 16:30   #52
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We had similar worries when we retired about 10 years ago. So we took a bit of a different approach from most, and decided to carve our remaining years up into five year segments and focus on a theme.

Our first five years was devoted to sailing our Island Packet 380. We didn't live on her fulltime (a couple of six month stretches being the longest), but managed to put in about 16,000 nm, and explored and thoroughly enjoyed the Lesser Antilles, Bermuda, the Abacos, and the Chesapeake Bay. We sold the boat a year ago, grieving a bit, because our time on her were among the best of times in our 43 years of marriage.

Our second "five year plan" was living on a tropical island. The idea wasn't pre-meditated, it just came upon us suddenly while we were cruising here. We moved to Nevis full time a little over four years ago, and have loved the experience greatly. The people we've met and our experiences here have been extraordinary.

We're now thinking about our next five years, and think it'll involve moving back to the States to focus on soaking up some "culture", and doing some international traveling.

The worst thing I can imagine is to look back on your life and say, "Where did the years go?", having reached a point where you're no longer physically, mentally or fiscally able to do things you always wanted to do, and you've somehow let the years slide by without living those dreams, whatever they are. Sad, yes?

Nice post, Hud!
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Old 01-11-2010, 16:32   #53
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Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
Jonathon,

I was 48.

I have two daughters. The youngest was in first year university. We paid her tuition, left her with the house, a car and $75 a week. She found out what things cost and how to live on a budget. The next two years she paid half her own tuition.

One is never financially secure. I came to the conclusion that I could work forever and it would not really change my life materially. The more you make the more you spend on unneeded things. I used to spend more on lunches and parking than I spend all week now.

I sail and play online poker, for fun chips only.
Thanks

Your comments are 100% true and I found particularly amusing that You "used to spend more on lunches and parking than I spend all week now".

I moved out of the CBD to the coast about 3 hours drive to the city. My focus changed dramatically.

Need it to change more

thanks for sharing
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Old 01-11-2010, 17:05   #54
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Fantastic post... Vasco
our friends that aren't "boaty people" always think we are crazy. They can't see life without 6 digits or more. Well, they can keep their high end jobs, designer clothes, and expensive cars. Along with the heaviness of never-ending debt. We will continue to live with only what we really need, grill our cockpit burgers in warm, calm, quiet, anchorages, .... toasting with our ice cold beers, oh yea it just sucks to be us
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Old 01-11-2010, 21:17   #55
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My brother loves his work...that is what he lives for everything else is secondary and/or a result of his work...isn't that the way we are supposed to act in this society [he is a "type-A city-boy] on the other hand I am the black sheep of the family, to me enjoying and seeking out life is more important than the fast paced, stressful career oriented life we are told we must achieve. My mother an artist and growing up hearing of my father's unrealized dream of sailing around the world, I never "made it" financially but those in my family who did are now horribly in debt (an economy run on credit will do that to you when it crashes)
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Old 02-11-2010, 06:35   #56
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I just want to say thanks for starting this thread... It's a good one! I've thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and it's totally reinforced the many reasons why I am happy. Thanks for that!
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Old 13-11-2010, 16:40   #57
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Eh. I'd prefer ticky boxes to radio buttons here. We haven't left yet, but we're mostly debt free, we've got a boat and we're working hard on getting it fixed up the way we want it (and getting health issues fixed to get us the way we want it--double knee surgery, here I come).

So while we're on the '5 year plan' for taking off for good, it still feels like we're Living the Dream. That all of this work and prep and sweat has a purpose, and the sense of accomplishment I get every time another rust spot gets busted or a new system gets planned is another step on that road.
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Old 13-11-2010, 16:51   #58
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Trying to finish the last year of uni, living aboard, sailing regularly. Can't wait to go cruise.
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