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Old 08-01-2016, 06:57   #16
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pirate Re: Anchor Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by monte View Post
Haha Phil. A 40m line should do it . But as I said, we drop anchor in 6m close to the middle (not as far as the middle or you risk tangling others anchors) let out 60m of chain as we reverse to the shore, drop the fortress in sand and retrieve about half the chain. Most of the yachts send a swimmer or dinghy to shore to tie to a rock or tree.
Well.. with a 2+m draft and 27,000lbs I think that place would feel small for me.. though I do see a mono out there in the middle.. if folk feel the need to tie stern to.. fine.. but I like to swing.. unless its somewhere like Cala Pi..
However.. if I arrived and there were few boats.. then a couple of days later a charter herd appeared I cannot see me changing..
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Old 08-01-2016, 07:10   #17
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

Usually the first boat in dictates where others anchor, however, sometimes the one who's been there the longest is also an inconsiderate knucklehead (not implying anything towards the OP). I've seen it many times where some knucklehead drops 300-400ft of rode, then expects everyone else in the soon-to-be crowded anchorage to yield to their swing. It all appears well until the wind change at 3am when all mayhem ensues in the otherwise peaceful anchorage. The same mayhem also ensues when the culprit finally attempts to bring up their anchor from under the adjacent boats.

Which is why we generally anchor on the outside and a little further out, then we can just sit and watch the late night antics.
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Old 08-01-2016, 08:00   #18
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

We took a week of ASA courses in the VI's on a chartered Leopard, and reading this thread reminds me why we have no real desire to take our own boat down there.

To me, the phrase "It'll be fun, there will be lots of people there!" is the perfect oxymoron.
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Old 08-01-2016, 09:23   #19
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

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Originally Posted by monte View Post
He's a pic of the anchorage. Wind is predominantly easterly. Yachts anchor stern to all the way around the cove. Dropping the anchor near the 's' in sand will clear all the yachts stern tied. I guess the op dropped closer to the anchor symbol which is a bit too close to swing and still leave space for others.Attachment 116392
Actually, we were anchored way up near the point to the north as the last boat. We always grab that spot because no one likes it there cause you get slight rollers sometimes off Drakes. We drop just in the right spot so our scope (about 90') keeps us inside the reef up north and away from shore to the east. It's a tight and technical anchorage, but we've done it so much as no one else is ever in that spot.

Now, we have another mono who dropped an anchor to the south of us, but they didnt tie off so the move with us. We're okay with this even though they're in the same spot as A2 was.

We were looking and the only thing to tie off where we are would be trees. My husband doesn't like that idea as everyone else ties off to rocks, the trees aren't that big and he'd hate to kill a tree.

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Old 08-01-2016, 12:02   #20
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

find a log or similar and bury it in the sand with a loop of line sticking out that you could tie to? Home made mushroom you can leave when you go?
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Old 08-01-2016, 13:00   #21
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

Kimberlym,

Generally speaking, it is the first one to the anchorage who sets the method. By that criterion, you guys should have, too.

However, you wanted to swing (which we prefer, too) and anchored far enough off the mob to have swinging room. The late arrival just wanted somewhere safe to spend the night.

What could you have done differently? to take care of both you and your husband's priorities? What if you had gone over in the dinghy and asked them in a friendly way to re-locate as they were within your swinging circle? You were there first. For them, moving while it is light is preferable to moving in the dark should you swing. They might take it well, and might not. Some times "things" don't work out in a way that everyone's happy.

In crowded areas, something I've seen is monohullers who think the catamarans take up "too much" room--in this case, I'm sure the A2 saw you as taking up more than your fair share, hence the dirty looks. Life's ironic, sometimes.

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Old 08-01-2016, 14:24   #22
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandero View Post
. . . Avoid conflicts, idiots and selfish people. It's just not worth it.
The best advice I've seen on here in weeks.


Standard anchoring etiquette is that as long as you use normal scope, and shore tie if that's what everyone is doing, then those who come later have the responsibility of anchoring in a way that there won't be a problem.

However, I think there is hardly anything in the world which more idiotic than cruisers shouting at each other that they are anchored too close, or staring daggers and showing "bitch wings" to each other -- sheez, this is supposed to be for fun. I will therefore move, rather than put up with someone's bad temper, even if what I have done is perfectly reasonable and/or I was first. Like Sandero says -- it's just not worth it.

There was one case in my experience where someone was unhappy with how I had anchored, and moving would have been hard. How I solved that one you can read here:

Overboard -- Again :(


Another thing, is I definitely prefer cruising in areas wild enough that there are not crowds of boats. I spent a whole summer in the Baltic last year and don't recall ever sharing an anchorage with even one other boat. But obviously that is not a solution everyone can avail himself of.
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Old 08-01-2016, 14:33   #23
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

It always has seemed to me that no one knows how to anchor based on internet threads.

But from my personal anchoring experience so far it appears in real life that anchoring etiquette is based on who in the anchor is most willing to risk damage to their boat.
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Old 08-01-2016, 19:29   #24
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

To me,

This situation was complicated by the fact that the OP did not want to (or, maybe have the skills to) move her boat, without the help of her husband, who was ill below. Possibilities for her would have increased if she did have said skills. I've met women who don't even know how to drive their dinghies capably.

In fact, I really think husbands should get the wives to acquire some "survival skills", for anchoring and up-anchoring, dropping, setting, use of snubber--and dinghy driving. You never know when your partner will be incapacitated, as a woman, and it feels really good to know you can get the injured party aboard, safe, and get the whole shebang back into your dock, if necessary. I think even women who are not very interested to do it, and resist by making a fuss ought to toughen up and learn it, for the benefit of them as a couple, as well as just for her.

End rant.

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Old 08-01-2016, 20:08   #25
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
I think even women who are not very interested to do it, and resist by making a fuss ought to toughen up and learn it, for the benefit of them as a couple, as well as just for her.

End rant.

Ann
Thanks, great post.

No rant at all, simple "common sense" and we all know what that means to most of us.

Perhaps we might conclude from this and another recent post about California's off shore islands, that etiquette might be

#1 first in first there

#2 unless there's some local custom built over the years based on specific local conditions

part about #2 is that how do you know about it beforehand?

Answer: you usually don't. If you get there first at 1400 and the hordes come in at 1900 and do things differently???

It's a courtesy thing.

Should be.
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Old 08-01-2016, 20:09   #26
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

I completely agree with Ann's perspective here, especially her "rant", which is words of wisdom that applies far beyond this specific situation. I too am of the opinion that each member of a cruising couple needs to be able to operate their boat independently of their partner. This includes anchoring.

Yes, in general the first boat in the anchorage sets the pattern. In this case, as I understand it, the pattern is a shore tie and stern anchor. It sounds like you took great effort to be away from this crowd, but it appears that it would not be unreasonable for the offending boat to assume you were following the shore-tie pattern. A simple conversation with the newly arrived boat might have prevented all the hard feelings.

Of course, the same argument could be applied to A2. They should have observed your anchoring technique, and should have tried to speak with you about your set up. But the fact is, we only control our own actions. In this difficult situation I would have tried to speak with them first, and then if that didn't result in a satisfactory situation, I would have changed my own set up; either by setting up a land-tie, dropping a bow/stern anchor, or re-anchoring somewhere else.
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Old 08-01-2016, 20:59   #27
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

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I was taught that the first boat into an anchorage sets the anchor method. In this case, it appears to be a parking problem. Swinging freely might be considered the boating equivalent of taking up four parking places at WalMart.

and they sell ammo at WalMart....
Interesting thread. Learning a lot. Thanks guys. Now what did you say about guns?
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Old 08-01-2016, 22:59   #28
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

I hate anchoring bow and stern or having to run a line to shore, so I avoid it whenever practical. In this anchorage, Little Harbour, I tie to shore. It is rude for someone to anchor in such a fashion to take up the space that could easily be shared by 3 or 4 other boats by not anchoring in the same fashion as the majority or to put out excessive scope given the crowded conditions. And the VI are always crowded conditions. This anchorage is one of the few that isn',t full of moorings. There is room to single anchor in the center while other boats shore tie around the edges. But I don,'t see single anchoring on the sides as a neighborly choice.
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Old 09-01-2016, 00:15   #29
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

Maybe I'm living in a dream world, but don't you think, all things being equal, the mono all the way out at the very end, that if she had rowed over to the cat and explained: sick husband, need for ventilation, there first and well away, and A'2 in their swinging circle, that A-2, later to arrive, should move enough to clear the circle?

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Old 09-01-2016, 05:42   #30
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Re: Anchor Etiquette

This post about generalities...
(Ann Cates post, excellent)

The days are gone where anchoring is easy with huge bays and few boats.
Days have gone where the first boat is anchor Nazi.
Days are gone where you can lay out 7:1 or whatever you want.

Now we need to be cognisant of other boats.
Now we need to share the space.

I was in a port so small, in a far flung country, ordered to anchor in only 1 tiny inner harbour baylett we could only do it by anchoring fore and act. Except for one dickhead who refused and took up the space of 6 boats.

I wondered if his intransigence would be reflected at sea and it was only days before we found out in a convoy up the Gulf of Aden through (real) pirate waters.
Yep. Jerk in the anchorage, jerk at sea.

My rules:
Anchor as others.
Keep scope practical
When others arrive go below. Don't stand on deck watching.
Give any anchoring boat 30 minutes to set and check their position. Normally if they have anchored too close they will realise and move in that 30 minutes.
If I can help by dropping a bit more chain, or pulling some up I will to help a new commer.
If a boat's hull is over my anchor that's fine. (As long as its under their boat or boat swing, not their chain on top of my anchor).

After 30 minutes and they are too close I will dinghy over and welcome them to the anchorage and talk about what's it like onshore. After a while they always mention their position. I don't need to bring it up. They invariably mention it. Then I can casually ask what they think. They have then always moved or fixed it. No agro, no hassle. No nasty looks.



We are all in this game together. Not first, not last, but TOGETHER

And why did we pick this bay to anchor? Because a little slice of paradise. Paradise so rare we need to share.


Mark
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