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Old 06-07-2010, 01:13   #1
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Advice for a Poor Dreamer ?

Hello all,

I have been reading and very much enjoying the threads on this site, thank you very much.

I have about $10,000 and ample free time and skill to spend upon a boat that I hope to sail to Hawaii and back. Can anyone recommend a solid fixer upper that they personally think is an excellent boat. Mostly something that can be handled by one maybe two people and handles well. I don't need frills, just enough room so I can, if need be, build a head, galley, nav station, and anything else that will fit. Oh, inboard motor is a must.

To anyone that replies with advice I thank you in advance.

John
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:33   #2
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Hello all,


I have about $10,000 and ample free time and skill to spend upon a boat that I hope to sail to Hawaii and back.
Hi John

Welcome to the forum!

I'm not trying to be overly negative but, my advice would be to save up a little more cash. If you go and actually look at what $10,000 buys, it might make it out the harbour, but I doubt it would come back.

Greg
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:41   #3
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Thank you Greg,

I appreciate your response as it has made me see that I have not been as accurate as I could have been. I have the $10,000 and 3 years of time and possibly $10,000 more to put into her. I will say that I am a very handy craftsman and I will make the inside to suit my needs so I am more concerned with the overall handling/rigging/size.

Greg, what is your favorite cruiser under 35'?
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Old 06-07-2010, 02:04   #4
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Here are some proved oceangoing boats, take a look!





http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/boa/1791622381.html http://detroit.craigslist.org/mcb/boa/1810621371.html
1974 Cal-29 Sailboat
1969 Cal 34 SAILBOAT, Nice.
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:31   #5
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I think Cap'n Fatty bought his Hughes 38 for $3000 and spent a lot of time getting her seaworthy. 30+ years later, it's still floating and cruising.

It's possible and would take considerable sweat equity to get it going. I'd suggest looking at hurricane damaged or fixer-upper vessels. However, the cost of bring a boat back from the dead may be more than the cost of buying one that's moderately sailable. Good luck.
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:54   #6
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Thank you Greg,

I appreciate your response as it has made me see that I have not been as accurate as I could have been. I have the $10,000 and 3 years of time and possibly $10,000 more to put into her. I will say that I am a very handy craftsman and I will make the inside to suit my needs so I am more concerned with the overall handling/rigging/size.

Greg, what is your favorite cruiser under 35'?
This is always the conundrum - Let's say you can put 2100 hours a year into working on your boat - a standard work year. That's 6300 hours.

If you worked for 6300 hours at $10 an hour...

The worst thing is to buy a boat, start paying storage fees, start incurring costs and then be stuck with an incomplete boat.

Not saying this would happen to you but just saying it happens a lot.

Once you decide to undertake the restoration of a $10k boat you will find there are lots of them out there.
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Old 06-07-2010, 10:02   #7
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You would have to be very lucky to find an ocean going boat for the amount of money that you want to spend. Fixing up boats and making modifications isn't cheap, even though you do all the work.

Harry Pidgeon built his own boat on the beach for $1000 many years ago, and then sailed Islander a couple of times around the world. But he didn't pay for a boat yard, and he had a very basic boat without an engine.

If you get a backpacker boat with absolutely no gear on board, no bells and whistles, you can do it on the cheap. Polynesians built their catamarans out of logs with lashings and simple tools.

If you want to go back in time without electricity, electronics, and an engine, you can do it for $10,000. Get out your lead line, hand held gps, a sturdy hull, new rigging, and make your own sails. Then write a book and let us know how it went.

I have a friend who purchased a new Tartan 30 many years ago. He started his circumnavigation with $28,000 in his pocket, and he finished his circumnavigation with the same amount of money. He worked his way around the world on a four year circumnavigation. He was the most disciplined, positive, and happy person I have ever known. Most people could not do it the way he did.
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Old 06-07-2010, 10:25   #8
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No problem with dreaming brother!
Just so long as you can dream easy when you are underway. It might be a good idea to buy the boat, and learn to sail her while you continue to build up the kitty a little bit. Congratulations on beginning your voyage, and good luck to you.
Spencer
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Old 06-07-2010, 14:32   #9
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Harry Pidgeon built his own boat on the beach for $1000 many years ago, and then sailed Islander a couple of times around the world. But he didn't pay for a boat yard, and he had a very basic boat without an engine.

If you get a backpacker boat with absolutely no gear on board, no bells and whistles, you can do it on the cheap. Polynesians built their catamarans out of logs with lashings and simple tools.

If you want to go back in time without electricity, electronics, and an engine, you can do it for $10,000. Get out your lead line, hand held gps, a sturdy hull, new rigging, and make your own sails. Then write a book and let us know how it went.
I am beginning to think that a sextant and charts are they way for me. I want a visceral experience and I think if I had a gps system with an electric autopilot i think it should take away from the fun.

I like the sound of this Harry Pidgeon, I think I will do some research on him. Thank you for dropping his name.

As to the book, if I find that the sea is for me that is exactly what I plan on doing.
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Old 06-07-2010, 16:22   #10
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John, one for your to muse over, but please cost the whole project before you start, or as others have said it might be cheaper to start with something in better condition.

1975 Ferro Cement Sailboat Sail New and Used Boats for Sale -

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Old 06-07-2010, 20:03   #11
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buying ferro is investing in a parking lot--make sure is well built--many are not--and make sure is surveyed....is uninsurable and many marinas will not accept ferro..gooodluck.......

i bought my formosa 41 for 10k--i still have to do a little work but she is a cruiser....fully loaded with recent electronix and freshly rigged.....

is a buyers market and will only get worse for seller and better for buyer so dont rush into anything..that tayana 37 in lake st catherine will remain there for a few--is cheeep..lol--just gotta know where to look...
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Old 06-07-2010, 20:51   #12
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There are a ton of just what you're looking for!! I'd sail quite a few of them to Hawaii with some time to go through things. Try this search on yachtworld.

(Sail) Boats For Sale
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Old 07-07-2010, 10:38   #13
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I hear the same old arguement about how you'll put more money into refitting a boat than if you bought one ready to sail or how the boat will never be worth the money that you put into it.

Face it- No boat will be worth the money you put into it. They all suffer from market swings and general depreciation. If you take out a loan, and pay the interest, pay dockage, and upkeep, you'll never get that back.

Who cares?

Keeping an "old shoe" sailing can be an advantage provided you can meet a few simple but important criteria:

1. Free or very cheap storage/dockage. You don't need storage fees eating into your boat bucks while you refit. Hopefully you have some property or a good friend with land.

2. Be handy, already have an investment in quality tools.

3. Have access to quality used parts as well as a source of affordable new parts where "used" isn't safe or practical.

4. Make progress every week. Avoid the "project boat death spiral". The longer it sits, the more it decays, even GRP boats. Eventually, all you're left with is a gelcoat-crazed hull of zero value.

Choose a boat known for their durability, low maintenance requirements and high parts availability, not just their creature comforts or sailing ability.

Sweat is free. I'd rather pay myself in sweat than pay a bank any day.
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Old 07-07-2010, 10:48   #14
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First, learn to sail. Learn seamanship. Get experience before going transpac. Too many people want "experiences" without working for it. I have no respect for anyone who would put rescue folk at risk for their "adventure". Not saying you intend to but still a point to be made.
That said a Pearson Triton or Vanguard should fit the bill in that price range. Not the best but OK in the right conditions. Google "Pearson Triton Atom". Ken
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Old 07-07-2010, 13:48   #15
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