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Old 04-02-2014, 16:22   #16
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

did anyone else find the embedded link to SAPPING?

Sapping Attention: Reading digital sources: a case study in ship's logs

There are animations here of the transits by date & speeded way up. It also has much nicer comments below without the vitriol.
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Old 04-02-2014, 16:37   #17
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

More fascinating stuff. A large subset of the position plots are whaling voyages, not point-to-point transits. If you look at the animation of just whaling you'll see that a lot of the black area in the South Atlantic, and north of Hawaii, and in some of doldrum areas is the result of ships going where the whales were, rather than where the wind was good.
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Old 04-02-2014, 16:51   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
What surprises me, is the lack of presence along the European route south to the canaries and then across. I thought that was the traditional route to the Americas. But obviously not , anyone comment on that ?

Dave
Little sail trade done with Central America methinks in comparison to the Clipper routes down to the Cape Verdes then across to Brazil.. Cape of Good Hope.. before running for India, the Spice islands and Oz.... main traffic to the Caribbean and US back then was slaves from Africa.. then rum, sugar and cotton etc went via Bermuda..
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Old 04-02-2014, 17:05   #19
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

Quote:
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Little sail trade done with Central America methinks in comparison to the Clipper routes down to the Cape Verdes then across to Brazil.. Cape of Good Hope.. before running for India, the Spice islands and Oz.... main traffic to the Caribbean and US back then was slaves from Africa.. then rum, sugar and cotton etc went via Bermuda..
Just look at that plot again. Loads of shipping on Americas , Azores , Europe , but I always thought that's almost an exclusively west east route. Where's the corresponding east -west traffic. , odd

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Old 04-02-2014, 17:09   #20
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
Just look at that plot again. Loads of shipping on Americas , Azores , Europe , but I always thought that's almost an exclusively west east route. Where's the corresponding east -west traffic. , odd

Dave
That's what I was looking at when I made my comments aboutOUTBOUND only traffic on pg 1. Looks like half is missing.
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Old 04-02-2014, 17:10   #21
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
Just look at that plot again. Loads of shipping on Americas , Azores , Europe , but I always thought that's almost an exclusively west east route. Where's the corresponding east -west traffic. , odd

Dave
I would have thought similarly, but take a look at the SAPPING plot referenced by Nicholson58:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=WVnuWXk8w4g

You can see both eastbound and westbound traffic sailing essentially direct between NY and Great Britain. Doesn't seem to be a lot of traffic between the rest of Europe and the US. Don't know if that is how it was, or an artifact of the data set.
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Old 04-02-2014, 17:18   #22
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Most of the old sailing routes were dominated by the Portuguese, Dutch and British.. trade came from and to the E and goods were dropped in W ports on the return trips after Indian cotton was converted in English mills and then shipped back out and sold to the Indians.. tea for Opium to the Chinese.. etc etc..
Tourism was not popular back then..
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Old 04-02-2014, 17:50   #23
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

Ok, now I get it. It is the whaling fleet being tracked thus the lack of E-W traffic.
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Old 04-02-2014, 19:34   #24
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

Actually looking at the you tube video , I think what we're seeing is steamer traffic on the north altantic ( ie essentially 1800 onwards ) these essentially went ' straight across" and used the Azores as fuel dumps. Hence the abandonment of the traditional south till the butter melts route.

I suspect the same is true of the ships logs plots. It's steam ships.

We'd really want to see data from the 18th century and previous to see sailing ship routes.

Dave
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Old 04-02-2014, 23:19   #25
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

I think you're spot on. Digging into it deeper the map is based on the US Maury subset of ICOADS (Google is your friend). Think Yotreps for the last 200 years. The Maury collection is 1.3 million position and weather observation reports for the years 1794 to 1863, with the bulk of the observations from 1830-1860. The purpose of the ICOADS dataset is to look at weather information, so type of vessel takes much more digging. The map is an amalgam of all the various types of shipping for the period, so does not just show sail. And a large part of the dataset (since it is based on US ships) is the whaling fleet, which had their own reasons for going where they did.
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Old 05-02-2014, 14:47   #26
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Re: A use for all those ships logs...

"Big data analysis" is a developing science but it is showing promise in many areas. Records of movements using mobile phone data is proving vital in transport planning to understanding human behaviour during a disaster. (see Vientiane Times)
This is an interesting use of historical data to much the same thing.
However, the authors do urge caution because the data is biased, being American records of mostly whaling vessels.
I was surprised by the lack of traffic to Australia which was a major exporter of wool and wheat in the 19th century. I also noted the heavy traffic across the Tasman sea between Australia and NZ.
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