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Old 28-06-2015, 02:11   #16
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

The point about rolling at anchor is invalid.

On a monohull you can always use flopper stoppers to very good effect.
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Old 28-06-2015, 02:14   #17
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by med View Post
The point about rolling at anchor is invalid.

On a monohull you can always use flopper stoppers to very good effect.
The Multis have them built in as standard............

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Old 28-06-2015, 02:40   #18
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

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Originally Posted by DumnMad View Post
44 - you seem so determined to keep debating this subject that I suspect you have underlying serious doubts about your choice of boats.
I suspect you are completely and utterly wrong.
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Old 28-06-2015, 02:51   #19
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

The way I see it, the key take-away is simply "do your homework and buy a vessel that suits your needs." If you're planning to sail high latitudes and expect to get hammered, get a (steel-hulled) mono. If you're sailing more forgiving waters and mostly downwinders, a cat could be the vessel of choice for you.
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Old 28-06-2015, 03:56   #20
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

I find myself cringing every time the mono Vs multi debate comes up! It is likely, the OP was, perhaps, even trying to dampen down the simmering embers by posting such a balanced piece.

It's like some debate about religion or politics. Most don't care and get about their lives and pursuits never entering the debate. Some occasionaly express a view trying to be careful, balanced and constructive. A few like to lob in the odd "bomb" knowing it will casue a stir while they sit back and smirk. And still, a minority remain fervent "believers" in their cause....regardless....and closed to alternate views. These are the are the maritime "jihadists".

The article states the obvious and treads path of balance and reconciliation, highlighting weaknesses and deficiencies of both types of craft. Of course there will be exceptions, like cats that sail well if not competively to windward (like 44C'c) and monos that excel down wind in comfort. All at a compromise in some other aspect of performance or price.

None of the debate should matter to individual owners, because (surely) they have the right boat fo them. Why the need to tell everyone else they are wrong. Sheeesh. If you've found the Holy Grail, keep it to yourself and bask in your self satisfaction (quietly).

I regularly crew on a racing Archambault 40 in club and coastal racing. Its great. I like the heal, getting wet on the bow when setting the spinnaker, being "rail meat" and mostly, being part of the team. But a team it is, because it would be a handful to sail solo, and I would't want to be sleeping in her for days at a time. On the other side, I own a Lagoon 440. I get my family out on it regularly as well as many non sailors. There is no way they would be with me on the racing mono. At the end of the day, I just like it all. No, I love it all! I embrace the differences. Welcome the change. Sailing solo, on a long costal or passage leg, the cat is just so easy. If I want my family with me, it got to be the cat. If I want thrills, competition and comraderie with a bunch of like minded fanatics, its the mono.

Can't we just like sailing! Regardless. And enjoy the variety on offer. It's OK to have variety.....
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Old 28-06-2015, 05:38   #21
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

I think this was a very well written article and one that should be read by all that are trying to decide whether a multi-hull or mono-hull should be their next boat.

Well done! Thanks.
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Old 28-06-2015, 05:40   #22
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

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44 - you seem so determined to keep debating this subject that I suspect you have underlying serious doubts about your choice of boats.
Quite. Nobody is screaming that the sun is going to rise tomorrow. People shout, and get angry, and insistent, when they are uncertain.

But the continuing debate provides a lot of useful information to those inexperienced, like me, trying to make what is a fundamental, and to some extent, irrevocable, decision.
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Old 28-06-2015, 06:06   #23
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

It's a good article, but misses a few things. Like, the ability of a multihull to find an anchorage in the lee of an island in four feet of water.

So for someone like us, who frequently sail into totally uncharted shallow water near small islands it's a no brainer to have a 40 ft. boat with a 3 ft. draft. That's also a draft that will likely survive going over a reef at high tide, as well. The ventilation aspects of being up above the water in the tropics is lso important.

Would I take this boat around Cape Horn? No. Probably not. But then I have absolutely no desire to do that. I think maybe new sailors get too caught up in the magazines showing racers as a bunch of maniacal, drenched 20 year olds frantically cranking away on winches as spray flies from the bow of a big racing monohull. Nice images, but it's not really what sailing or cruising is about for a small family.


Some people buy sports cars, some buy Winnebagos, and some buy both. I'd love to have a moth as a dinghy lol
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:08   #24
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by med View Post
The point about rolling at anchor is invalid.

On a monohull you can always use flopper stoppers to very good effect.
Wow, that's the best you got?
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:29   #25
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
It's a good article, but misses a few things. Like, the ability of a multihull to find an anchorage in the lee of an island in four feet of water.

So for someone like us, who frequently sail into totally uncharted shallow water near small islands it's a no brainer to have a 40 ft. boat with a 3 ft. draft. That's also a draft that will likely survive going over a reef at high tide, as well. The ventilation aspects of being up above the water in the tropics is lso important.

Would I take this boat around Cape Horn? No. Probably not. But then I have absolutely no desire to do that. I think maybe new sailors get too caught up in the magazines showing racers as a bunch of maniacal, drenched 20 year olds frantically cranking away on winches as spray flies from the bow of a big racing monohull. Nice images, but it's not really what sailing or cruising is about for a small family.


Some people buy sports cars, some buy Winnebagos, and some buy both. I'd love to have a moth as a dinghy lol
Yes, I second your point about the cat's useful ability to get in shallow and anchor close to shore, as it opens up many more anchoring possibilities.
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:29   #26
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
It's a good article, but misses a few things. Like, the ability of a multihull to find an anchorage in the lee of an island in four feet of water.

So for someone like us, who frequently sail into totally uncharted shallow water near small islands it's a no brainer to have a 40 ft. boat with a 3 ft. draft. That's also a draft that will likely survive going over a reef at high tide, as well. The ventilation aspects of being up above the water in the tropics is lso important.

Would I take this boat around Cape Horn? No. Probably not. But then I have absolutely no desire to do that. I think maybe new sailors get too caught up in the magazines showing racers as a bunch of maniacal, drenched 20 year olds frantically cranking away on winches as spray flies from the bow of a big racing monohull. Nice images, but it's not really what sailing or cruising is about for a small family.


Some people buy sports cars, some buy Winnebagos, and some buy both. I'd love to have a moth as a dinghy lol
Excelent point. The whole racing theme has very little to do with cruising.
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:32   #27
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

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Originally Posted by SVNeko View Post
Wow, that's the best you got?
I am not in one camp or the other. But to suffer rolling at anchor because you are in a monohull is not necessary. Hence my point in case that was the knock out criteria for your particular choice.

I am amazed that I see flopper stoppers used so little - there are many anchorages in the western med where they could be used to good effect.
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:33   #28
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

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Yes, I second your point about the cat's useful ability to get in shallow and anchor close to shore, as it opens up many more anchoring possibilities.
You can always get a centre board yacht like one of the Ovnis.

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Old 28-06-2015, 07:54   #29
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DumnMad View Post
44 - you seem so determined to keep debating this subject that I suspect you have underlying serious doubts about your choice of boats.
Who wouldn't regret their choice after having to put up with this sort of thing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=34qgJRprAlE

I can only say that I feel his pain, and I cry for him.
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Old 28-06-2015, 07:59   #30
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re: A Reasonably Balanced Article.

I've seen flopper stoppers used a bit. They don't seem to work at all. I've also never found an anchorage where there is much difference for access for a cat than a mono. We draw 1.3m and the average mono maybe 1m more, so what's the difference? We anchor in 2-3m and they anchor in 3-4m but usually we have to allow for swinging and tides and anchor in 6m plus. Maybe specific places like the Bahamas or Whitsunday's are special cases but we are yet to come across any real advantage if a shallower draft. A decent dinghy helps get you to the beach just as fast if you are further out anyway. Rolling at anchor does seem to be a bit of a pita for the leaners, but some more so than others. A traditional steel narrow beam mono seems to roll a lot more then a more modern, wider hull. Depending on where you sail might effect the amount of roll you have to deal with, but in the Caribbean it doesn't seem to be a major problem
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