Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 10-05-2016, 20:30   #16
Registered User
 
scuba0_1's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: naples
Boat: 2005 Catalina 350
Posts: 670
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

If you know you want a live aboard soon don't waste your money on a boat slips ect and trying to sell it. Join a sailing club and rent them. Join a club and sign up for spots. Best way and save your money for your future boat.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________

__________________
scuba0_1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 20:40   #17
Registered User
 
Stu Jackson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cowichan Bay, BC (Maple Bay Marina)
Posts: 6,385
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepbluetj View Post
Fixing the boat is a big part of sailing/cruising unless you're wealthy enough to pay a yard to do everything.

And then you'll quickly learn that having a yard do anything means you'll learn how to fix their goofs, and figure out that you should have don it yourself to begin with to get it right.
__________________

__________________
Stu Jackson
Catalina 34 #224 (1986) C34IA Secretary
Cowichan Bay, BC, (Maple Bay Marina) SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)
Stu Jackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 20:53   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4,876
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Is your goal cruising?

If it's cruising and living aboard look for at least 30' unless you plan on your long term boat being less than 30'.

No better way to turn the wife off to cruising than by cramming her into too small of a space.

Even most 25' boats will still need a slip (you don't realistically trailer a 25' boat, set up the mast go for a 2hr sail and then reverse the processes even though it is technically possible).
__________________
valhalla360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 08:21   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Currently in Spain
Boat: Island Packet 420
Posts: 136
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

If you are near Virginia Beach, I would suggest you check out Grab Bag Sailboats- it is in Maryland, but not too far. They have a nice website that lists their boats for sale: Grab Bag Sailboats.

I purchased my first keelboat, a C&C 30, from them, they specialize in smaller sailboats that are inexpensive and good to learn on. And the, I sold it through them as well!
__________________
sailing_gal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 08:26   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Great Lakes
Boat: Laser x4 - Stiletto 23 - Grampian 26 - Next: Catalina 42 MkII
Posts: 68
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by savoir View Post
If you only want to day sail - J24

If you want to spend weekends aboard Bristol 27 or Cal 25.
In addition to this supportable plan, I suggest if you are new to the sport that you buy a laser+ dolley for $1k and have every member of your family sail it every day for 30 days over the summer in every kind of weather. Laser is available, inexpensive, durable, forgiving, fun and will teach you all the basics you need to know while building confidence and skill.

Then a J24 or Catalina 27-both plentiful and very affordable.
__________________
Divevac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 08:40   #21
Registered User
 
Davy J's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Tampa Bay
Boat: Gemini 105Mc
Posts: 105
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

I'll also recommend a Catalina 25. Easy boat to learn on, tender enough to let you know you need to do something. Big and heavy enough to give confidence.

Parts are readily available from a company called Catalina Direct and there is a large group of members at the C25 association that can give helpful advice on almost any situation.

C25 association forum:
Association Forum
__________________
Davy J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 08:45   #22
Registered User

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Fort Worth
Boat: Catalina 30 TR
Posts: 26
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Almost exactly the same position, except substitute young adults, and grand kids. I had a couple of lakes near me that I searched continuously looking for boat ads. Ran across quite a few, but got really lucky on a 1980 Catalina 30 at a local boat club. The owner donated it to the club for their youth sailing program. I am still working on stuff, but nice to sail it when not redoing a piece of wood or replacing stuff, like toilet seals, speakers, bilge pump, etc. Check the sails, I had to get a Genoa reconditioned due to a rip incurred during sailing, probably a little my fault!

Now that I have it a marina, I see a few of my neighbors have boats for sale. Might be good to check a few in your area and see if they have some with for sale signs on them, and not posted anywhere.

I wish you luck!
__________________
CShawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 08:56   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Holland, Michigan
Boat: Catalina 30
Posts: 148
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

There are a number of ways to approach this... my suggestion would be two boats that are great, forgiving, good sailors: Catalina 27 and Catalina 30. These can be obtained at a very reasonable price. The Catalina 27 is a wonderful learning boat, yet it can be fun for a weekender some place. The Catalina 30 is a great boat all around, and can take you out for a week if you want to. Both boats are easy to sail, easy to maintain, and hold their resale value well. I would buy a mid 1980's boat... most value for the money.

If you want to step up a bit, look at the Cal 28-II. I love mine. It's cheap, sails wonderfully, and has a great interior layout.
__________________
carlheintz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 09:00   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 76
Lightbulb Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

drop the bucks on sail time for awhile no slip fee no maintenance no insurance they have boats in va beach and norfolk and no i do not work for them i do have 2 of there boats down the dock from me and wait till u r ready buy a boat that u want to live on
__________________
roberthowell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 09:19   #25
Registered User
 
bailsout's Avatar

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Morro Bay, CA
Boat: Columbia Mark II 29'
Posts: 154
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Any yacht clubs around? Become a prospective member. Make friends. Sail and learn on their boats.
__________________
bailsout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 09:38   #26
Registered User
 
Stu Jackson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cowichan Bay, BC (Maple Bay Marina)
Posts: 6,385
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Interestingly enough, the space down below is not much different, if at all, between a Catalina 25 and a 27. This is because the outboard engine design of the 27 puts the engine in the lazarette, so the two extra feet of boat length don't go towards the inside of the boat (with essentially the same cockpit length). Just a reality, both nice boats, but you should know that those important two extra feet don't get you anything in the "rest" of the boat. The C25 has the engine mounted on the transom on a bracket, easy to use. The C27 lazarette design limits the number of different engines that can be used because the well limits the space, so not all of the new four strokes can fit there.
__________________
Stu Jackson
Catalina 34 #224 (1986) C34IA Secretary
Cowichan Bay, BC, (Maple Bay Marina) SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)
Stu Jackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 10:17   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,167
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Quote: "Are you looking for experience living aboard, or sailing?"

Stumble is right. Living aboard and sailing are two different beasts. They can coexist, though they are not naturally compatible. The trick is to learn, and to admit, what compromises you are willing to make in regard to each.

Motor cars are the second worst waste of money there is. Sailboats are the MOST worst waste of money their is. KNOWING how much you are going to be wasting, and accepting that while minimizing the waste, is a major part of the compromising.

TrentePieds is - obviously - 30 feet and JUST big enuff for man and maid. That's BEFORE the kiddies arrive. And the pets. TrentePieds' PO, being VERY weak on the fundamental concepts, blew away five and thirty grand on a new rig including that abomination that is a mast furling main. There is NO WAY that a motorsailer with a SA/D ration of 12.5 can benefit from that when she's in the Salish Sea. She ain't a racing boat! And in the Salish, when you get to sea state 5, you just nip off into a convenient sheltered cove! Meanwhile, all the stuff that contributes to living handsomely and contentedly aboard for long periods had been totally neglected.

Well - that is my good fortune. Apparently no sailor around here would have 'er. She had sat for several years. So the price was right. VERY right :-)

There is a splendid antique phrase you rarely see any more: "Ready for sea and in all respects fit for her trade". TrentePieds' "trade" is to keep MyBeloved contended by virtue of her lovely cabin arrangements and general good looks. She does that admirably. As for me, I'll adapt. I have skippered boats that SAIL far better. But sailing well isn't TrentePieds' "trade".

So in a sense I'm in the same boat as you. Living aboard is easy in TrentePieds. But I have to learn to sail. To sail HER :-)

And the moral of the story is that living aboard and sailing are fundamentally antithetical, but with a little compromising wondrous results can be achieved :-)

To get started you shouldn't have to spend more than eight or ten grand on the purchase of a suitable 30 footer. But count on ten grand a year in moorage, maintenance and "up-grade". More if you can't do the work yourself.

In PNW and in British Columbia good 30-and- 40-year-old boats in excellent condition are a dime a dozen. I suspect that the same would be true on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes.

But blow away a coupla grand on something like a Enterprise dinghy. It'll teach you SAILING quite quickly and safely. Consider the price of it "sunk cost" and make a present of it to some deserving youth when it's served its purpose for you :-)


TrentePieds
__________________
TrentePieds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 10:25   #28
Registered User
 
hamburking's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Kingston Ont Canada
Boat: Looking for my next boat!
Posts: 2,148
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Tanzer 22.

About $1,000 cdn.

Well built, fun to sail, good owners association...you can't go wrong.

Tanzer 22 fin keel. 1976 | sailboats | Kawartha Lakes | Kijiji
__________________
hamburking is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 11:27   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Antioch CA
Boat: Cal 39
Posts: 189
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Withthewind View Post
My husband and I want to live aboard in a few years. We will still have a couple teens and kids with us. What would a good practice boat be, so we can learn the ropes? We'd like to do all we can to prepare in the meantime. Is there something we could buy to help learn that is around $10k-ish? Anything I should look for or look out for? We can practice in the great lakes or Virginia Beach, as we have property close to both. Thanks.
TurninTurtle had the right idea.

Find a local SAILING club that offers sailing lessons in very small boats, like Optis. (Many yacht clubs have mainly power boats.) That is the way to learn to sail - one person boats do very little damage, if any, when you screw up. If spouses learn together on the same boat there is always the tendency to not really learn what one spouse thinks will be the usual job of the other. ("He's going to be steering so I needn't learn that well." "I'll be steering so she should learn about sail trim.") Also when something the boat speeds up "I did it" and when it slows "he did something wrong". One person boat to begin learning the basics. THEN, after the basics of sailing are learned, that is when you should start learning the teamwork of sailing a bigger boat, a keel boat.

Then, and maybe concurrently with learning on a keel boat, crew for many others on various boats AND rent various boats similar to what you think you want (That'll continually change as you try various boats.) And THEN, after you have more knowledge, that is the time to consider buying.

Most experienced cruisers know of people that bought a boat and learned on it while sailing off to, let us say, Australia. That experience was so bad that they sold the boat in Australia, divorced, moved to North Dakota and Oklahoma, and never went near salt water again.
__________________
secrabtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 14:07   #30
Registered User
 
cwyckham's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Niagara 35
Posts: 1,870
Re: A good inexpensive learner boat?

I agree with your idea of buying a learner boat. You can certainly rent for a bit, but you won't learn how to maintain a boat and her systems that way. For me, that's a big part of the learning curve and important when it comes to choosing your "forever boat" in a few years.

Since you won't be living aboard your starter boat, you can get away with something in the 27-32' range from the early '80s. It will be cheap to buy and fairly easy to sell. Bigger, more expensive boats can take years to sell. A 1985 Catalina 27 should go pretty easily for what you paid for her as long as you kept up with the maintenance.

Here's a few articles on learning to sail, choosing a first boat, and how much a first boat will cost you.
__________________

__________________
Chris
SailMentor.com - Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat
cwyckham is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good Food, Good Flavor, Good Value, Good Packaging Steady Hand Provisioning: Food & Drink 22 23-05-2016 17:26
My New 40 Year Old Project Learner mycatalina33 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 1 12-05-2015 16:38
Slow Learner TDog Meets & Greets 3 23-09-2013 18:46
Late Starter Fast Learner WDSTRAND Meets & Greets 14 20-04-2011 13:41
Good Morning, Good Evening and Good Night bullitt774 Meets & Greets 10 30-08-2010 15:35



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 19:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.