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Old 15-01-2016, 09:05   #1
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US Visa for British cruisers

Good day everyone,

I am currently sailing the Caribbean with my partner, we would like come June to head into the US to sail round the Great Loop. Unfortunately we are struggling with information for how to get US non immigrant Visas, for a year to sail the Great Loop.

Has anyone done this in the past, or have 1st or second hand experience of this please can you give us some help.

We have been warned that if we try to obtain US visas in Nassau in the Bahamas for cruising purposes, they are likely to turn you down. If this happened we would be left 60 miles from the US, trying to avoid hurricane season.

Thanks everyone.

Simon and Holly
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Old 15-01-2016, 09:19   #2
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Quote:
We have been warned that if we try to obtain US visas in Nassau in the Bahamas for cruising purposes, they are likely to turn you down.
I have not heard this b4. We worked in Bahamian waters on a Cayman flagged boat and th owners proposed to get the B1/B2 visa in Nassau. We were able to get them in time in Germany b4 we left so I can not give you first hand information.

You can file the application well in advance online and than get an appointment at the embassy. You can also check the waiting time for the interview online.

I think no reason to be concerned ...

Regards,

Carsten
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Old 15-01-2016, 09:28   #3
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Carsten,

Thanks for your reply. We are hoping that we can get the the Bahamas and apply for a B1/B2 visa, just worried if we get refused then we cannot head south for hurricane season, and not head north due to not being around in.

Thanks for your comment, much appreciated.
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Old 15-01-2016, 11:29   #4
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Generally it is stated that the U.S. visa application must be done in the country of residence and I had thought that there were no exceptions to this rule; but in a post in this forum last year someone stated that the consulate in the Bahamas had issued tourist visas for cruisers. I've applied for several different types of U.S. visas in the past (including my current tourist visa) and all of the had to be done in my country of residence at the time and included a personal interview.
Although it is very hard to reach real humans at U.S. embassies, it might be best to call directly to get accurate current information.
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Old 15-01-2016, 11:35   #5
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

... when you do the online application you can choose from a list of US embassies world-wide where you want to have the interview.

No need to do this in your country of residence.

Regards,

Carsten
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Old 15-01-2016, 11:51   #6
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

My experience is second-hand, and I think you are right to be concerned, but I also don't have any advice on getting around it. I know both people who got denied and people for whom it worked out fine. I suspect (as in many things dealing with officialdom) it depends on how nice and polite you are, how good you are at telling your story, and what side of bed they got out of that morning. You might want to look here:

https://travel.state.gov/content/vis...t/visitor.html

and I think your concern is probably noted in this item:
Quote:
You must schedule an appointment for your visa interview, generally, at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the country where you live. You may schedule your interview at any U.S. Embassy or Consulate, but be aware that it may be difficult to qualify for a visa outside of your place of permanent residence.
It is possible outside your country of residence, but exactly what makes it possible or not is not clear. Good luck.
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Old 16-01-2016, 07:16   #7
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

I have just applied for a US non immigrant visa few weeks ago.

The process is pretty clear

1. you have to apply online and in the first step choose the US embassy where you will have the interview
2. Then you pay 160 US$
3. Then you schedule your interview which has to be face to face at the embassy you have choosen
4. Have the interview
5. about 5 days after the interview you can pick up your passports with the visa in it.

I did all this in Barbados. Beside the time consuming activities I fiund the process easy and straight forward. I am german nationality and I think you can apply at any US Embassy which suits your travel plans. It might be the easiest to do this in the UK for you, however from my experience there is mo real need to apply in your home country.
BR
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Old 16-01-2016, 07:22   #8
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

As I see the situation, but verify.

From the US Embassy site in the UK:

Link from Entering the USA Visa free under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP):

"Citizens of the following countries: the United Kingdom, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium Brunei, Chile, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland may be eligible to travel to the United States visa free under the Visa Waiver Program if they are traveling for business, pleasure or are in transit, and they meet specific requirements. Click here for further information. "

The "in transit" is important.

Clicked for further information:

"You will qualify for travel under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) if you are a citizen of the United Kingdom, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium Brunei, Denmark, Finland, Chile, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, or Switzerland:
•traveling on a valid, full validity, machine readable or e-passport with an electronic chip. Click HERE for further information. The date on which your passport was issued is an important factor in determining whether your passport will be acceptable for visa-free travel.

United Kingdom Passport holders please note: A passport indicating that the bearer is a British Subject, British Dependent Territories Citizen, British Overseas Citizen, British National (Overseas) Citizen, or British Protected Person does not qualify for travel without a visa. A passport which states holder has Right of Abode or indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom does not qualify for visa free travel;
•for business, pleasure or transit for less than 90 days. Visa-free travel does not include those who plan to study, work or remain in the United States for more than 90 days;
•are not ineligible to receive a visa under U.S. visa law. Travelers who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, those with criminal records, (the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act does not apply to U.S. visa law), certain serious communicable illnesses, those who have been refused admission into, or have been deported from, the United States, or have previously overstayed on the VWP are not eligible to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Program. Click here for further information;

Plus, if entering the United States by air or sea you are:
•holding a return or onward ticket. If traveling on an electronic ticket, a copy of the itinerary must be carried for presentation to U.S. immigration at the port of entry. Note: Travelers with onward tickets terminating in Mexico, Canada, Bermuda or the Caribbean Islands must be legal permanent residents of these areas;
•entering the United States aboard an air or sea carrier that has agreed to participate in the program. This includes aircraft of a U.S. corporation that has entered into an agreement with the Department of Homeland Security to carry passengers under the Visa Waiver Program. Note: Other private or official aircraft or vessels do not meet this requirement; and

•has received authorization to travel under ESTA;

Or, if entering the United States by land from Canada or Mexico,
•is in possession of a completed form I-94W, issued by the immigration authorities at the port of entry, and a $6.00 fee, payable only in U.S. dollars.

Transit under the Visa Waiver Program

If in transit through the United States to a destination in Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, you may re-enter the United States on the return journey using any mode of transport, as long as the total visit, including both periods of time spent in transit and in Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, does not exceed 90 days.

If you are in transit to a destination outside of Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, the return journey must be on a participating carrier, but need not be within 90 days, as you will be required to make a new application for admission. If you intend transitting through the United States to take up residence in Mexico, Canada, Bermuda or the Caribbean Islands, you must be a legal permanent residents of the areas.

Please note that you will be requried to otain travel authorization under the Electronic System for Travel Authorization before boarding the carrier. "

Clicked for e-Passport info:

"Machine Readable & Biometric Passports

They type of passport required for travel under the Visa Waiver Program will depend on the date on which it was issued:
•Passports issued, renewed/extended before October 26, 2005 must be machine-readable;
•Passports issued, renewed/extended between October 26, 2005 and October 25, 2006 must also contain a digital photograph.
•Passports issued, renewed/extended on or after October 26, 2006, must be electronic.

Temporary and emergency passports must meet the electronic passport requirement.

Diplomatic and official passports are exempted from digital photo and electronic chip requirements, but must be machine-readable.

It is important that you check the website of the U.S. Embassy in the country of passport nationality for any further changes before traveling. Failure to determine that your passport qualifies for the VWP may result in you being denied boarding by the airline. Follow this link for websites of U.S. Embassies, Consulates, and Diplomatic Missions.

Passport Valdity

With the exception of passport holders of Brunei the requirement that a passport be valid for six months beyond the holders stay in the United States is waived. If your passport is valid for less than 90 days, you will be admitted into the United States until the date on which the passport expires. Note: Citizens of Brunei are not covered by this ruling and must be in possession of passports valid for at least six months from the date on which they depart the United States, regardless of their proposed length of stay."
.................................................. ........................................

Be aware the situation is going to change (April 1st I think, but don't hold me to it), with electronic passports making things more straightforward (in theory). You 'may' find getting things sorted before the end of March, easy enough, and that may avoid initial confusion as a new system gets up to speed..

At a Port of Entry into the USA, you can obtain a Cruising Permit/License from CBP, which is apparently valid for 12 months. As you will be in transit to Canada via ICW (without a Cruising Permit/License I think you have 90 days to clear USA waters on the way), if you stay in Canadian waters long enough (staying up to 6 months in Canada should be easy, and an extension for a further 6 months shouldn't be too difficult if necessary), then you can 'presently' surrender your Cruising Permit/License on leaving USA waters, and on return, get a new one (with fresh 12 months validity) rather than have the counter still ticking down while you are in Canadian waters. But CHECK THIS IS STILL SOUND with CBP before you surrender it. Your best bet at the moment, I think, is to visit the USA Virgin Islands, clear in there, and get your Cruising Permit/License there. Then you can ask about surrendering it when you want to enter Canadian waters, and whether the re-application for a new one is still straightforward and the best procedure. As you will be a long term tourist travelling the ICW, they should want to encourage and help you (it's all foreign earnings). *There may be issues with using Canada or Mexico for clock resetting, likely due to NAFTA*

I am in the situation of buying a boat in America (wish me luck, purchase process just started - I lost one last week), and as a buyer am in the position of re-flagging and Registering with the UK SSR, and will start off already inside USA waters, so will either have to get a Cruising Permit/License there, or, leave USA waters within 90 days (difficult to travel without SSR Documentation in my hands, along with a Ship Station License in my hands), stay outside for a qualifying period (Caymans for example), then I can come back in once again under the Red Ensign and apply for that Cruising Permit/License, or dock for a limited time to buy some gear and provisions.

As I was born before the 1988 cutoff, I don't need the Wildlife and Fisheries Safe Boating License - equivalent to our ICC (a visiting yacht in transit or with a Cruising Permit/License shouldn't need one anyway), but given that the boat I am after is already in USA waters, I will probably still do it just as a courtesy and to respect their usual procedures (if visiting Canada I will get their equivalent too). I tried getting it before arriving, but the BoatUS site won't proceed in creating an account for the online test without having a US zip code or State (even though they take foreign addresses), plus it might help get a reasonable quote for insurance. It's free, so why not? Pass the online test, print out the Certificate, take it to a Wildlife and Fisheries Office with the necessary passport photo(s) and get the License for free too (a bit different to the RYA over here).
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Old 16-01-2016, 07:29   #9
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Ribbit - the Visa Waiver Program does not apply to people entering the USA on a private vessel. This has been hashed many times here, but follow this link and note the paragraph
Quote:
If you are coming in a private sailing vessel, ESTA is not an issue since you must have a visa to arrive in the U.S. by that mode. VWP is not approved for travel to the U.S. on a pleasure boat.
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Old 16-01-2016, 08:05   #10
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Zanshin is 100 percent correct.

ESTA does not work on pleasure/private boats. If you try to enter the US on your boat based on the assumption that ESTA works you will be refused and might have to carry legal consequences!

All crew on private boats entering US waters must have a valid Visa in their passport prior to entry. There is abslolutly no way around it.
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Old 16-01-2016, 08:26   #11
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

The visa needed is a B1/B2.

I have heard its difficult to get in the Bahamas. But have not tried it.

Its worth the hassle because the USA is fun.

It may be expedient to do the online application, book an interview in Barbados, fly there for a week and do or and grab the visa. Remembering they are holding your passport so you can't just got in for the interview. Good bit was (in Australia) they had the passport back to me in 24 hours.
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Old 16-01-2016, 13:26   #12
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

We are British and we have just got our B1/BN2 visas, we started to apply in Guatemala but the wait for an interview was about 3 MONTHS!!!!

So we applied in Belize, the interview was granted within 1 week. (Interestingly the application process was different to Guatemala)

Couple of things to note

The US embassy keeps the passport after the interview to put the visa in but they would not despatch it back to us so we had to make a second visit to pick it up.

Both the US embassy in the UK and in Belize did not know that you needed a B1/B2 visa if you are visiting US territory by boat so maybe worth doing some research first and cite them some cases if they want to query it. We got the impression that they were issued “just to be on the safe side”
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Old 16-01-2016, 15:50   #13
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

I am far from certain that you would want to do the Great Loop in a sailboat.
What is your draught. Mast would be on deck of course. And, lots of horsepower for the current.
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Old 16-01-2016, 16:36   #14
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribbit View Post
As I see the situation,
From the US Embassy site in the UK:

Link from Entering the USA Visa free under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP):

"Citizens of the following countries: the United Kingdom, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium Brunei, Chile, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland may be eligible to travel to the United States visa free under the Visa Waiver Program if they are traveling for business, pleasure or are in transit, and they meet specific requirements. Click here for further information. "

The "in transit" is important.

Clicked for further information:

"You will qualify for travel under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) if you are a citizen of the United Kingdom, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium Brunei, Denmark, Finland, Chile, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, or Switzerland:
•traveling on a valid, full validity, machine readable or e-passport with an electronic chip. Click HERE for further information. The date on which your passport was issued is an important factor in determining whether your passport will be acceptable for visa-free travel.

United Kingdom Passport holders please note: A passport indicating that the bearer is a British Subject, British Dependent Territories Citizen, British Overseas Citizen, British National (Overseas) Citizen, or British Protected Person does not qualify for travel without a visa. A passport which states holder has Right of Abode or indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom does not qualify for visa free travel;
•for business, pleasure or transit for less than 90 days. Visa-free travel does not include those who plan to study, work or remain in the United States for more than 90 days;
•are not ineligible to receive a visa under U.S. visa law. Travelers who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, those with criminal records, (the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act does not apply to U.S. visa law), certain serious communicable illnesses, those who have been refused admission into, or have been deported from, the United States, or have previously overstayed on the VWP are not eligible to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Program. Click here for further information;

Plus, if entering the United States by air or sea you are:
•holding a return or onward ticket. If traveling on an electronic ticket, a copy of the itinerary must be carried for presentation to U.S. immigration at the port of entry. Note: Travelers with onward tickets terminating in Mexico, Canada, Bermuda or the Caribbean Islands must be legal permanent residents of these areas;
•entering the United States aboard an air or sea carrier that has agreed to participate in the program. This includes aircraft of a U.S. corporation that has entered into an agreement with the Department of Homeland Security to carry passengers under the Visa Waiver Program. Note: Other private or official aircraft or vessels do not meet this requirement; and

•has received authorization to travel under ESTA;

Or, if entering the United States by land from Canada or Mexico,
•is in possession of a completed form I-94W, issued by the immigration authorities at the port of entry, and a $6.00 fee, payable only in U.S. dollars.

Transit under the Visa Waiver Program

If in transit through the United States to a destination in Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, you may re-enter the United States on the return journey using any mode of transport, as long as the total visit, including both periods of time spent in transit and in Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, does not exceed 90 days.

If you are in transit to a destination outside of Canada, Mexico or the adjacent islands, the return journey must be on a participating carrier, but need not be within 90 days, as you will be required to make a new application for admission. If you intend transitting through the United States to take up residence in Mexico, Canada, Bermuda or the Caribbean Islands, you must be a legal permanent residents of the areas.

Please note that you will be requried to otain travel authorization under the Electronic System for Travel Authorization before boarding the carrier. "

Clicked for e-Passport info:

"Machine Readable & Biometric Passports

They type of passport required for travel under the Visa Waiver Program will depend on the date on which it was issued:
•Passports issued, renewed/extended before October 26, 2005 must be machine-readable;
•Passports issued, renewed/extended between October 26, 2005 and October 25, 2006 must also contain a digital photograph.
•Passports issued, renewed/extended on or after October 26, 2006, must be electronic.

Temporary and emergency passports must meet the electronic passport requirement.

Diplomatic and official passports are exempted from digital photo and electronic chip requirements, but must be machine-readable.

It is important that you check the website of the U.S. Embassy in the country of passport nationality for any further changes before traveling. Failure to determine that your passport qualifies for the VWP may result in you being denied boarding by the airline. Follow this link for websites of U.S. Embassies, Consulates, and Diplomatic Missions.

Passport Valdity

With the exception of passport holders of Brunei the requirement that a passport be valid for six months beyond the holders stay in the United States is waived. If your passport is valid for less than 90 days, you will be admitted into the United States until the date on which the passport expires. Note: Citizens of Brunei are not covered by this ruling and must be in possession of passports valid for at least six months from the date on which they depart the United States, regardless of their proposed length of stay."
.................................................. ........................................

Be aware the situation is going to change (April 1st I think, but don't hold me to it), with electronic passports making things more straightforward (in theory). You 'may' find getting things sorted before the end of March, easy enough, and that may avoid initial confusion as a new system gets up to speed..

At a Port of Entry into the USA, you can obtain a Cruising Permit/License from CBP, which is apparently valid for 12 months. As you will be in transit to Canada via ICW (without a Cruising Permit/License I think you have 90 days to clear USA waters on the way), if you stay in Canadian waters long enough (staying up to 6 months in Canada should be easy, and an extension for a further 6 months shouldn't be too difficult if necessary), then you can 'presently' surrender your Cruising Permit/License on leaving USA waters, and on return, get a new one (with fresh 12 months validity) rather than have the counter still ticking down while you are in Canadian waters. But CHECK THIS IS STILL SOUND with CBP before you surrender it. Your best bet at the moment, I think, is to visit the USA Virgin Islands, clear in there, and get your Cruising Permit/License there. Then you can ask about surrendering it when you want to enter Canadian waters, and whether the re-application for a new one is still straightforward and the best procedure. As you will be a long term tourist travelling the ICW, they should want to encourage and help you (it's all foreign earnings). *There may be issues with using Canada or Mexico for clock resetting, likely due to NAFTA*

I am in the situation of buying a boat in America (wish me luck, purchase process just started - I lost one last week), and as a buyer am in the position of re-flagging and Registering with the UK SSR, and will start off already inside USA waters, so will either have to get a Cruising Permit/License there, or, leave USA waters within 90 days (difficult to travel without SSR Documentation in my hands, along with a Ship Station License in my hands), stay outside for a qualifying period (Caymans for example), then I can come back in once again under the Red Ensign and apply for that Cruising Permit/License, or dock for a limited time to buy some gear and provisions.

As I was born before the 1988 cutoff, I don't need the Wildlife and Fisheries Safe Boating License - equivalent to our ICC (a visiting yacht in transit or with a Cruising Permit/License shouldn't need one anyway), but given that the boat I am after is already in USA waters, I will probably still do it just as a courtesy and to respect their usual procedures (if visiting Canada I will get their equivalent too). I tried getting it before arriving, but the BoatUS site won't proceed in creating an account for the online test without having a US zip code or State (even though they take foreign addresses), plus it might help get a reasonable quote for insurance. It's free, so why not? Pass the online test, print out the Certificate, take it to a Wildlife and Fisheries Office with the necessary passport photo(s) and get the License for free too (a bit different to the RYA over here).
Thanks for a great reply, I have been interested on finding out about this subject and have been asking informally amongst friends with no clear answer, this clears most of my doubts up for me. Thanks again.
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Old 16-01-2016, 19:20   #15
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Re: US Visa for British cruisers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacuri View Post
Thanks for a great reply, I have been interested on finding out about this subject and have been asking informally amongst friends with no clear answer, this clears most of my doubts up for me. Thanks again.
It may be a great reply but its simply not correct.

You must have a B1/B2 visa to enter. A visa waiver is not acceptable.

As for clearing in and the cruising license, here is the new information
http://www.cbp.gov/es/node/98956
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