Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 16-10-2019, 02:29   #1
dar
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Sailing in Cuba

Hellow friends,

I plan to sail next year in Cuba ( catamaran bareboat sail )
Few questions:-
1. Itenerary recommanded for 7 days included visiting 3-4 marinas
2. What is the best mounth to sail in good and comfortable sea condition ?
3. I prefer if possible one way sailing

I would be happy to get recommandations any further tips
Thanks
Ami
__________________

dar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-10-2019, 03:32   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 36,356
Images: 241
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Ami.
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-10-2019, 04:18   #3
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bristol RI
Boat: Cape George 31
Posts: 1,031
Re: Sailing in Cuba

We need more information: From where do you plan to sail? I'm not aware of boats available for charter in Cuba. And would you charter a Cuban boat if you could? Judging from the state of their rental cars earlier this year, I'd not put to sea in anything they could offer.
Best time is whenever it isn't hurricane season. If on the south coast, Northerly winds in Dec and Jan won't bother you much. If on the north, well, wait till March or so. South coast has Cienfuegos, Santiago, and Isla de la Juventud as nice stops. I've only been to Havana in the north, but the coast to the east looks intriguing.
I'm not sure what you mean by one way sailing--I doubt if you could take a charter boat in one port and leave it in another. Cuba doesn't have that sort of facilities in my experience. Which admittedly isn't huge.
__________________
Ben
zartmancruising.com
Benz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-10-2019, 05:26   #4
dar
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Hi Ben,
Thanks for yours comments,
Dream yacht charter company suggested to me this itinerary:-
Day 1: Explore Cienfuegos with its striking and brightly-colored French colonial architecture flanked by palm trees, wide streets with covered sidewalks and a vibrant waterfront. Head to Parque Jose Marti, a large square home to great street food, shops, free Wi-Fi and a bandstand. Walk Punta Gorda, dine at the nearby restaurants and watch the sunset. Take a taxi for an hour further inland to the El Nicho waterfalls, where you can swim in the less busy lower pool. As you head to Guano del Este, keep a look out for Jagua Castle at the entrance to the bay and dolphins. Guano del Este features a strange-looking lighthouse and sandy beaches with coral in shallow waters.

Day 2: Spend the day at Cayo Largo, a small limestone cay which was popular with pirates wanting to hide their treasure. You can anchor off Playa Sirena, which is a fabulous beach fringed with palm trees and amazing snorkeling, although the waves are invigorating. Make sure your camera is ready, as photos taken here will be the envy of all with its glittering turquoise waters and plenty of soft white sandy beaches to choose from. Try Playa Paraiso, which was rated by TripAdvisor as one of the top 25 beaches in the world, or, if you want seclusion, head west of Sol Cayo Largo.

Day 3: Spend the day exploring Cayo Largo in the morning. Animal lovers can visit the Sea Turtle Hatchery, Centro de Rescate de Tortugas Marinas, which is part of a major conversation program. Keep watch for the resident iguanas too. After lunch head to Quinto Canal, about 30 minutes away, where you can bathe in a natural pool off a sandbank that is calm and warm. Sail onwards 40 minutes to the Cayos Los Ballenatos coral reef, which is great for snorkeling and has vibrant underwater marine life. You’ll spot plenty of tropical fish and perhaps even sea turtles. You can head back to Quinto Canal or Cayo Largo overnight.

Day 4: After breakfast make for Cayo Rosario, an uninhabited island except for a healthy population of iguanas. This is a popular diving and snorkeling location because of the richness and variety of fish and sea creatures. If you want to relax on the beach, you’ll find a stunning, large stretch of pink sand that wraps the lower part of the cay. You can spend hours looking at the shells and beachcombing.

Day 5: Set sail for Cayo Estopa and enjoy the beach, lazy swimming and snorkeling. In the afternoon, sail to Cayo Rico with its light pink sands, healthy coral and fantastic shoals of tropical fish – you might even see large starfish and rays. This is a wild island with just one small seafood restaurant near the jetty, which is popular and reasonably priced if you want fresh lobster. As you relax on the beach, you can watch the iguanas scuttling around and they love eating fruit.

Day 6: Head back to Cayo Largo to relax on one of the many beaches. Dine at the beach grills (ranchóns) at lunch time where you can order shrimp and lobster. You can also find a la carte restaurants, which are open in high season. If you are there on a Friday, you can take part in the weekly fiesta for a small fee. Sail onwards to Cayo Sal and explore the cay.

Day 7: Head back to Cienfuegos before 10am to disembark.

The best period is from december to april.
We propose a large fleet of catamarans (from 38 to 62 feet) with our without skipper/cook, and a few monohulls.
Boats are from/to Cienfuegos. One way to Cayo Largo possible"

Have you any comments on their proposal ?
Thanks
Ami
dar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 01:06   #5
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bristol RI
Boat: Cape George 31
Posts: 1,031
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Quote:
Originally Posted by dar View Post
Hi Ben,
Thanks for yours comments,
Dream yacht charter company suggested to me this itinerary:-
Day 1: Explore Cienfuegos with its striking and brightly-colored French colonial architecture flanked by palm trees, wide streets with covered sidewalks and a vibrant waterfront. Head to Parque Jose Marti, a large square home to great street food, shops, free Wi-Fi and a bandstand. Walk Punta Gorda, dine at the nearby restaurants and watch the sunset. Take a taxi for an hour further inland to the El Nicho waterfalls, where you can swim in the less busy lower pool. As you head to Guano del Este, keep a look out for Jagua Castle at the entrance to the bay and dolphins. Guano del Este features a strange-looking lighthouse and sandy beaches with coral in shallow waters.

Day 2: Spend the day at Cayo Largo, a small limestone cay which was popular with pirates wanting to hide their treasure. You can anchor off Playa Sirena, which is a fabulous beach fringed with palm trees and amazing snorkeling, although the waves are invigorating. Make sure your camera is ready, as photos taken here will be the envy of all with its glittering turquoise waters and plenty of soft white sandy beaches to choose from. Try Playa Paraiso, which was rated by TripAdvisor as one of the top 25 beaches in the world, or, if you want seclusion, head west of Sol Cayo Largo.

Day 3: Spend the day exploring Cayo Largo in the morning. Animal lovers can visit the Sea Turtle Hatchery, Centro de Rescate de Tortugas Marinas, which is part of a major conversation program. Keep watch for the resident iguanas too. After lunch head to Quinto Canal, about 30 minutes away, where you can bathe in a natural pool off a sandbank that is calm and warm. Sail onwards 40 minutes to the Cayos Los Ballenatos coral reef, which is great for snorkeling and has vibrant underwater marine life. You’ll spot plenty of tropical fish and perhaps even sea turtles. You can head back to Quinto Canal or Cayo Largo overnight.

Day 4: After breakfast make for Cayo Rosario, an uninhabited island except for a healthy population of iguanas. This is a popular diving and snorkeling location because of the richness and variety of fish and sea creatures. If you want to relax on the beach, you’ll find a stunning, large stretch of pink sand that wraps the lower part of the cay. You can spend hours looking at the shells and beachcombing.

Day 5: Set sail for Cayo Estopa and enjoy the beach, lazy swimming and snorkeling. In the afternoon, sail to Cayo Rico with its light pink sands, healthy coral and fantastic shoals of tropical fish – you might even see large starfish and rays. This is a wild island with just one small seafood restaurant near the jetty, which is popular and reasonably priced if you want fresh lobster. As you relax on the beach, you can watch the iguanas scuttling around and they love eating fruit.

Day 6: Head back to Cayo Largo to relax on one of the many beaches. Dine at the beach grills (ranchóns) at lunch time where you can order shrimp and lobster. You can also find a la carte restaurants, which are open in high season. If you are there on a Friday, you can take part in the weekly fiesta for a small fee. Sail onwards to Cayo Sal and explore the cay.

Day 7: Head back to Cienfuegos before 10am to disembark.

The best period is from december to april.
We propose a large fleet of catamarans (from 38 to 62 feet) with our without skipper/cook, and a few monohulls.
Boats are from/to Cienfuegos. One way to Cayo Largo possible"

Have you any comments on their proposal ?
Thanks
Ami
I looked up Cuban charters and it seems your plan is not so far off base as I thought. Cienfuegos had no charter fleet when I was there, which admittedly was quite a while ago...I only hope the boats are owned and maintained by someone other than the Cuban government.
My only caution then would be to be aware that not everything is Cuba is exactly as advertised. While they seem to be making a valiant effort to support tourism, they have a real shortage of resources and a completely different mindset.
Oh, and, bring cash. The only place I found to use a bank card of any sort was the airport in Havana.
Please let us all know how it goes, as Cuba is a vast and mostly unknpwn cruising destination.
__________________
Ben
zartmancruising.com
Benz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 04:53   #6
Registered User
 
s/v Moondancer's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Miami
Boat: Boatless
Posts: 1,457
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Good morning,
This is Nell Kellett responding. Several friends and I recently chartered a catamaran via Platten Yacht Charters based in Cienfuegos, Cuba. They were very professional and the boats were in good condition. Our float plan was similar to the one mentioned in an earlier posted response. Provisioning was easy and we had a wonderful time. With the exception of hurricane season, anytime is good for sailing in Cuban waters. You will find the people friendly and eager to help. The biggest challenge is dealing with the current visa limitations for USA citizens. Your airline may be able to sell you the visa required at ticketing. If you can, please bring supplies to donate to the cuban people. The fishermen love polarized sun glasses and the locals like solar lights, clothes, OTC medications and anything else you can bring that you are willing to leave behind. I had two full bags and returned with one small bag that contained only my life vest and sailing gear.
if i may be of further assistance you are welcome to email me directly to my gmail account at nelliekellett
you will love cuba.
__________________
Phil

"Remember, experience only means that you screw-up less often."
s/v Moondancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 05:31   #7
dar
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Hi Ben,

Thanks,
I still yet didn't decide to sail there,
I will continue to gather information about the area to convince myself to sail there
Ami
dar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 05:46   #8
dar
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Hi Nell,
Thanks yours reply,
I still yet did'nt decide to sail there,
I will continue to gather information about the area to be sure it is indeed very beautiful and attractive to sail there
Ami
dar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 06:11   #9
Registered User
 
Sand crab's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Gig Harbor, WA
Boat: 34' Crowther tri sold 16' Kayak now
Posts: 3,824
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Where are you from, Ami.


BTW Yes there are charters in Cuba. Some have cats.
__________________
We don't need no stinking badges.
Sand crab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-10-2019, 06:27   #10
dar
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Re: Sailing in Cuba

Israel
__________________

dar is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
Cuba, sail, sailing

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fly into CUBA, sail out of CUBA MoTull Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 0 14-04-2017 09:57
Crew Wanted: Florida to Cuba, Cuba to Mexico panamasvk Crew Archives 2 05-11-2014 21:56
American sailing to cuba on foreign flagged sailing yacht?? aprilsplash Off Topic Forum 28 08-07-2013 07:54
Question About Sailing to Cuba Soft Air Atlantic & the Caribbean 37 11-12-2008 21:53
Sailing to Cuba dosfotos Atlantic & the Caribbean 3 05-06-2008 09:13

Advertise Here


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:53.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.