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Old 19-10-2009, 09:46   #16
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What would it's pacific predator be?
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Old 19-10-2009, 09:52   #17
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Published records of natural predators of adult red lionfish are unknown. But again, studies of the closely related Pterois miles may provide us with some indication of the natural history of P. volitans. In the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, the piscivorous cornetfish, Fistularia commersoni, appears to be a predator of Pterois miles. Judging by the presence of a specimen of P. miles in the stomach of a large F. commersoni, and its particular orientation therein, a published note concludes that cornetfish in the Red Sea may utilize their ambush tactics to seize lionfish safely from the rear, consuming them tail first.

As cornetfishes are widespread, effective piscivores, species sympatric with P. volitans may be predators of the same.

Other as yet undocumented predators of the red lionfish might include sharks, as many sharks are known to consume noxious or venomous organisms with no obvious ill effects.
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Old 19-10-2009, 10:00   #18
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Wow, the only cornetfishes I'm familiar with are pretty skinny, they actually swallow a lionfish?
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Old 19-10-2009, 10:36   #19
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During recent trips to the Bahamas I have been appalled by the number of lionfish I have seen. At fresh creek in Andros two years ago my wife counted 60 in just 200 yards of sea wall near the marina. What was of more concern to me was the fact that the mangrove roots inland of the marina seemed to be completely inundated with small to medium size lionfish. Many reef fish and food fish use this habitat during their juvenile stages. I fear that this is the more important impact rather than on the reefs themselves. Last year I visited Conception Island for the first time and was struck by the lack of small fish on the reefs. We saw a few lionfish, but there was a dearth of small fish especially grunts and snappers that are so common on bahamian reefs. I was told by someone that Conception never had the populations seen in other areas of the Bahamas but I find it hard to believe that it was this bad. Since it was my first time at Conception I have nothing to compare it to. Can people who have been to Conception in the past confirm that there were few fish on the reefs?
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Old 04-11-2009, 19:34   #20
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I just returned from the Bahamas where I went lionfish hunting with Stuart Cove. The group caught over 100 lionfish to be used mostly for eating, but some for research. While we were there we also enjoyed a great meal of lionfish served in various ways, including ceviche, coconut baked, and lionfish cakes. Lionfish is a delicious fish, much like grouper.
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:36   #21
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We saw a few in Fresh Creek and some of our friends speared them but we didn't try to eat them. Heavy gloves are recommended.

Since the venom is a protein I wonder if papain (meat tenderizer) would work for treatment? I think if I had a papaya handy I'd spread it all over the affected area. And then try hot water!
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:45   #22
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how big are they on avarage??Are they worth the troble to clean>?
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:49   #23
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To those who have seen them diving in the Caribbean what is the biggest you have seen, what would be the typical size seen along the reefs?
In most pictures I have seen they looked quite small. Too small to make much of a meal.
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"Since the venom is a protein I wonder if papain (meat tenderizer) would work for treatment? I think if I had a papaya handy I'd spread it all over the affected area. And then try hot water!"
I have heard of people using meat tenderizer containing papain on jelly fish stings.

Steve
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:51   #24
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The ones I saw were about a foot. They're fat little guys, though. I just stayed away but I might try spearing some for eating this year but I'm a bit wary of the damn thing sliding down the spear and stinging me. As for spearing they're very slow and don't hide so they should be like sitting ducks.
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:16   #25
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Out of the 100+ that we caught during the past weekend, about 30 or so were larger than 12 inches, with several big boys coming in larger than 17 inches and one huge 18 inch.

The good folks at Stuart Cove, speaking from experience, said that the only remedy (if you can call it one), is to immerse the area in hot water (as hot as you can stand), which neutralizes the heat from the sting. The great pain will last several hours, then will decline over the next day or so. You definitely don't want to get stung. Not life threatening, but will put a damper on your dive vacation.

As for spearing, yes they are very easy targets, they will not move unless you somehow miss them with the spear (as I did at first), they will boogie out of the way and go into a deep hole within the coral formation.
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:59   #26
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A lionfish sting WILL ruin your vacation - at least a day or 2 of it.
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Old 05-11-2009, 08:59   #27
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Here in the TCI there is a contest going on. catch lionfish and register them with the Dept. of Environmental stuff. I think there is a $ 3000 prize for the first person to catch 3000 of them. Contest running a year, or until someone claims the prize.

I was wondering, though, about eating them. We no longer eat grouper, or snapper, or anything that eats the small reef fish due to ciguatera concerns. We eat wahoo, tuna, and dolphin. Give the other species away to friends.


Wouldn't a lionfish be a perfect place for the ciguatera toxin to accumulate, since they live on small reef fish?
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Old 05-11-2009, 12:23   #28
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I have seen Lionfish in the Carenage Lagoon here in Grenada. They are everywhere in the Caribbean.
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Old 05-11-2009, 12:53   #29
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Love that video. Tastes like Chicken. Boc-BOK!

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Old 21-11-2009, 19:14   #30
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A number of lion fish have been showing up in the Florida Keys this year. Is their a recommended first aide treatment if you are attacked?
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