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Old 21-03-2014, 15:08   #31
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Re: First time offshore

Pete,
I can't speak for Mike (the original poster), but as he is "crew" on a "delivery", I doubt he has any say in their routing....and I suspect the owner of the Hinckley either wants the boat up there early enough to haul-out and prep the boat for the summer sailing season, or perhaps for the Newport-Bermuda Race??
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete33458 View Post
so if I may make a suggestion: given your concerns, why take the direct route? Why not either do what we're doing and sail up through the Old Bahamas Channel and across the straits to FL, then follow the coast to RI, or otherwise, go through the Turks&Caicos and the Bahamas and do the same thing, crossing from Grand Bahama to north FL or even Georgia?
In any case, if she's well maintained (and if you can afford a SW-52, you can afford to maintain it properly), a SW-52 would have no trouble handling whatever weather heads their way...
A fingertip touch on the wheel controls a big spade rudder, which steers a wonderful hull...even heeled over, beating to windward, she's a better ride than almost any other boat I've ever sailed....(now, she's not the most "modern" design and her below-decks layout isn't the best for cruising, but she is a sweet dream to sail!!)






Pete, this depends on WHERE you are at...
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete33458 View Post
I should mention that you can always hail "all stations" on the VHF and ask whether anyone can provide current forecasts along your route, I've done this before and generally gotten the information I needed.
If you're in the Bahamas, Florida, Chesapeake, US East Coast, etc....yes, you can usually find someone that will respond to your hail on Ch. 16...
But, in many areas (especially offshore 100's or 1000's of miles), there are few if any vessels monitoring VHF Ch. 16....and you'd need to put out a VHF-DSC All-Ships Call (and possibly a DSC-"Securite" Call)...



Fair winds..

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Old 21-03-2014, 15:10   #32
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Re: First time offshore

Thanks for clearing that all up for me.
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Old 21-03-2014, 15:12   #33
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Re: First time offshore

John, just to verify, that Sony or Sangean radio will definitely receive weather info that far out?? We talked today about a sat phone, but really the weather info is more important.
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Old 21-03-2014, 16:08   #34
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Re: First time offshore

Sort out in your own mind who is responsible for what.
Entrust the skipper and his number 1 to worry about ensuring the vessel is up to the passage. Adequate comms/navigation aids, routing etc, etc are not your responsibility so let them worry. Take an interest - that is adequate.
Your part of the mission is to ensure that you can usefully contribute to the overall safety and enjoyment of the trip so you are not a liability or a burden.
Get the mind set sorted -you will probably not enjoy all of it, expect to be very seasick and miserable from about 12 hours out to maybe 36 hours - even in fair weather and even if you normally are ok with sea legs.
Get your personal kit sorted. Have your own mini medical kit - whatever suits you - sea sickness pills that work for you ,snacks, glucose tablets that might be the only thing you can stomach for a day or two, lip salve, sun tan cream, sun glasses, sun hat, gloves, your own lifejacket & harness, knife, torch, miniflares, plb - all the little personal goodies that the ship owner is not responsible for - you are.
Brush up on your sailing skills so you can pull your weight - taking bearings, interpreting radar, light and shapes recognition, emergency life support and first aid - in the event of an emergency you may be the only fit person onboard. Prepare yourself to be an asset not a nuisance.
Once you get onboard, learn the ship -what are the hazards and how do important things work, fire extinguishes, first aid kit, engine starting routine, fog horn, radio call sign, pumps, how do the heads work. And once at sea the real learning starts. Be prepared to learn and of course laugh!
Enjoy. Fair winds and tides.
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Old 21-03-2014, 18:04   #35
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Re: First time offshore

Mike,
Absolutely yes...I own a Sangean 909 myself, and I have used it well offshore....and my totally non-tech brother used one for years, doing deliveries between the VI's and US....
Quote:
Originally Posted by irishmike View Post
John, just to verify, that Sony or Sangean radio will definitely receive weather info that far out?? We talked today about a sat phone, but really the weather info is more important.
But, be aware that there can be a LOT of radio noise/interference in a marina/yacht club/boat yard....
So, make sure you try the radio away from land/the marina FIRST....or try it out in the open on-shore (AWAY from plasma TV's, washing machines, etc.), BEFORE you try it out at sea....so, you'll know what you're doing...


1) Read the threads I linked to earlier, for details...(especially about use of and external antenna and choosing the correct frequency for the time of day...)

And, watch this video, about frequency choice....AND you'll hear what a USCG Offshore weather forecast sounds like...




You can also hear what the simulated voice "Iron Mike" sounds like here...
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/hfvoice.mp3





2) Understand that there may be some radio noise (known as RFI) generated on-board, that can effect your reception....
(sometimes you may need to shut off the refrigeration for a few minutes, while you're receiving the weather forecasts....and almost certainly you'd to make sure your battery charger and/or inverter is also completely OFF)

I have other videos that show a LOT about HF radio operations on-board...
captainjohn49 - YouTube



3) Use the correct frequency for the correct time of day and distance from the transmitters (they're in Chesapeake, VA)...
For the Offshore forecasts, you'll typically use 13089 or 8764 (daytime) for most of your passage...and maybe 17314 for the hi-seas forecasts...
And, at night, 8764, or 6501....(and maybe 4426, if you are close to shore, at night...


For the schedule, read the schedule for NMN, here on this page...
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/hfvoice.htm
Sorry, it didn't show up here, very well...



Chesapeake(NMN)
HF Voice Broadcast Schedule4426, 6501, 8764 kHz (USB)0330Z1 0515Z20930Z 6501, 8764, 13089 kHz (USB)1115Z21530Z12130Z12315Z 28764, 13089, 17314 kHz (USB)1715Z




4) Just string a wire up a flag halyard and plug it into the ext antenna input of the radio....and it's a great antenna..



5) FYI, while the SW N. Atlantic Offshore weather forecast covers the whole area (OFFSHORE WATERS FORECAST FOR THE TROPICAL N ATLANTIC FROM 07N TO 22N BETWEEN 55W AND 64W...THE SW N ATLANTIC S OF 31N W OF 65W....INCLUDING BAHAMAS...AND THE CARIBBEAN SEA.), the forecast is broken down into small sections, such as the section you'd be in first (ATLANTIC S OF 22N BETWEEN 65W AND 70W INCLUDING PUERTO RICO
TRENCH).....

Here are examples....
Quote:
.SYNOPSIS...A COLD FRONT EXTENDS FROM 27N65W TO THE BAHAMAS NEAR
22N75W. A DISSIPATING COLD FRONT N OF 29N E OF 75W WILL MERGE
WITH THE FIRST FRONT TONIGHT. THE MERGED FRONT WILL DISSIPATE BY
SAT. SE WINDS WILL INCREASE OVER NW WATERS SAT IN ADVANCE OF
ANOTHER COLD FRONT THAT WILL SLOWLY MOVE INTO THE AREA BY
MON...STRETCHING FROM 30N65W TO 29N81W BY LATE MON AND MOVING E
OF THE AREA BY TUE. A STRONGER COLD FRONT WILL MOVE INTO NW
WATERS TUE AND LIE FROM 31N73W TO 23N80W LATE TUE AND FROM
26N65W TO 20N69W LATE WED.


~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~


ATLANTIC S OF 22N BETWEEN 65W AND 70W INCLUDING PUERTO RICO
TRENCH-

450 PM EDT FRI MAR 21 2014


TONIGHT
E TO SE WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 5 TO 6 FT.

SAT
E TO SE WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

SAT NIGHT
E TO SE WINDS 5 TO 10 KT...INCREASING TO 10 TO
15 KT LATE. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

SUN
SE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT...BECOMING SE TO S 5 TO 10 KT
LATE. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

SUN NIGHT
SE WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

MON
S WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 4 TO 5 FT.

TUE
SE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 3 TO 4 FT.

WED
SE TO S WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 3 TO 5 FT.

And, the same area Synopsis, but vastly different weather...

Quote:
ATLANTIC FROM 27N TO 31N BETWEEN 65W AND 70W-
450 PM EDT FRI MAR 21 2014

GALE CONDITIONS POSSIBLE


TONIGHT
N TO NE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 6 FT.

SAT
NE TO E WINDS 15 TO 20 KT. SEAS 5 TO 6 FT.

SAT NIGHT
SE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

SUN
S WINDS 5 TO 10 KT. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

SUN NIGHT
SW WINDS 5 TO 10 KT...INCREASING TO 10 TO 15 KT
LATE. SEAS 4 TO 6 FT.

MON
NW WINDS 15 TO 20 KT. SEAS 5 TO 7 FT.

TUE
SE WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 7 TO 10 FT.

WED
W WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 13 FT IN W SWELL



You can click on what section you want, and read them on-line here....
NWS Marine Offshore Marine Forecasts by Zone



6) The High Seas Forecasts cover large areas, but ARE useful, and will certainly alert you to approaching / pending storms...
Quote:
FZNT02 KNHC 212130
HSFAT2
HIGH SEAS FORECAST
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
2230 UTC FRI MAR 21 2014
SUPERSEDED BY NEXT ISSUANCE IN 6 HOURS
SEAS GIVEN AS SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT...WHICH IS THE AVERAGE
HEIGHT OF THE HIGHEST 1/3 OF THE WAVES. INDIVIDUAL WAVES MAY BE
MORE THAN TWICE THE SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT.
SECURITE
ATLANTIC FROM 07N TO 31N W OF 35W INCLUDING CARIBBEAN SEA AND
GULF OF MEXICO
SYNOPSIS VALID 1800 UTC FRI MAR 21.
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC SAT MAR 22.
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC SUN MAR 23.
.WARNINGS.
.NONE.
.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.
.ATLC FROM 07N TO 12N BETWEEN 45W AND 55W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25
KT. SEAS 8 TO 10 FT. ELSEWHERE S OF 15N BETWEEN 40W AND 60W
WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN NE SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST S OF 13N BETWEEN 47W AND 60W WINDS 20 KT OR
LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN NE SWELL.
.48 HOUR FORECAST WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.
.CARIBBEAN FROM 10.5N TO 14N BETWEEN 72W AND 79W NE TO E WINDS
20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 12 FT IN NE SWELL. ELSEWHERE S OF 15N
BETWEEN 73W AND 82W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS 8 TO 11 FT IN NE
SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 11N TO 14N BETWEEN 67W AND 78W NE TO E
WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 11 FT IN NE SWELL. ELSEWHERE S OF
15N BETWEEN 70W AND 80W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 9 FT
IN NE SWELL.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 11.5N TO 13.5N BETWEEN 69W AND 78W NE TO
E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 10 FT. ELSEWHERE FROM 10N TO 16N
BETWEEN 68W AND 80W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 9 FT IN NE
SWELL.
.REMAINDER OF AREA WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.
.FORECASTER SCHAUER. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER.

Quote:
FZNT01 KWBC 212150
HSFAT1
HIGH SEAS FORECAST FOR METAREA IV
NWS OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER WASHINGTON DC
2230 UTC FRI MAR 21 2014
CCODE/1:31:04:01:00/AOW/NWS/CCODE
SUPERSEDED BY NEXT ISSUANCE IN 6 HOURS
SEAS GIVEN AS SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT...WHICH IS THE AVERAGE
HEIGHT OF THE HIGHEST 1/3 OF THE WAVES. INDIVIDUAL WAVES MAY
BE MORE THAN TWICE THE SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT
SECURITE
NORTH ATLANTIC NORTH OF 31N TO 67N AND WEST OF 35W
SYNOPSIS VALID 1800 UTC MAR 21
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC MAR 22
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC MAR 23
.WARNINGS.

STORM WARNING
.INLAND LOW 51N63W 990 MB MOVING NE 30 KT. WITHIN 600 NM E
QUADRANT WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 8 TO 13 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST LOW 58N53W 977 MB. FROM 60N TO 62N BETWEEN 45W
AND 51W WINDS 35 TO 50 KT. SEAS 12 TO 16 FT. ELSEWHERE N OF 52N
WINDS 25 TO 40 KT. SEAS 9 TO 15 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST COMPLEX LOW WITH MAIN CENTER 63N36W 968 MB. N
OF 62N E OF GREENLAND WINDS 40 TO 55 KT. SEAS 13 TO 19 FT.
ELSEWHERE E AND NE OF A LINE FROM 67N60W TO 60N59W TO 50N35W
WINDS 25 TO 40 KT. SEAS 10 TO 17 FT.

GALE WARNING
.LOW 65N35W 997 MB MOVING E 10 KT. NE OF A LINE FROM 60N50W TO
51N35W WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 10 TO 22 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST LOW E OF AREA AND CONDITIONS ABSORBED BY LOW
58N53W NOTED ABOVE.

GALE WARNING
.LOW 40N45W 1010 MB MOVING NE 25 KT. WITHIN 300 NM N...480 NM E
AND 420 NM SE AND S QUADRANTS WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 9 TO 13 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST MERGED LOW 49N40W 998 MB. S OF 52N BETWEEN 35W
AND 52W WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 9 TO 14 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LOW AND CONDITIONS E OF AREA.

GALE WARING
.FROM 35N TO 45N W OF 60W WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS TO 12 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 33N TO 49N BETWEEN 52W AND 61W WINDS 25
TO 35 KT. SEAS 9 TO 13 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 40N TO 50N BETWEEN 45W AND 35W WINDS 25
TO 35 KT. SEAS 10 TO 14 FT.

GALE WARNING
.24 HOUR FORECAST NEW LOW INLAND 44N72W 1002 MB. WITHIN 240 NM
E...360 NM SE AND 720 NM N QUADRANTS WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS TO
12 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LOW 50N53W 992 MB. FROM 35N TO 50N BETWEEN 45N
AND 70W WINDS 25 TO 40 KT. SEAS 8 TO 17 FT.

HEAVY FREEZING SPRAY WARNING
.MODERATE TO HEAVY FREEZING SPRAY N OF 61N W OF GREENLAND.
.24 HOUR FORECAST MODERATE TO HEAVY FREEZING SPRAY N OF 61W W OF
52W.
.48 HOUR FORECAST MODERATE TO HEAVY FREEZING SPRAY N OF 57N W OF
51W.
.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.
.DENSE FOG. VSBY OCCASIONALLY LESS THAN 1 NM FROM 43N TO 48N
BETWEEN 44W AND 56W.
.24 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG FROM 42N TO 53N BETWEEN 35W AND 41W.
.48 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG WITHIN 120 NM OF 43N49W.
.HIGH 48N37W 1024 MB MOVING SE 20 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH DISSIPATED E OF FORECAST AREA.
.HIGH 33N79W 1022 MB MOVING E 30 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 32N66W 1025 MB.
.48 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 37N42W 1025 MB.
.FORECASTER LEE. OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER.
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
ATLANTIC FROM 07N TO 31N W OF 35W INCLUDING CARIBBEAN SEA AND
GULF OF MEXICO
SYNOPSIS VALID 1800 UTC FRI MAR 21.
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC SAT MAR 22.
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1800 UTC SUN MAR 23.
.WARNINGS.
.NONE.
.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.
.ATLC FROM 07N TO 12N BETWEEN 45W AND 55W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25
KT. SEAS 8 TO 10 FT. ELSEWHERE S OF 15N BETWEEN 40W AND 60W
WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN NE SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST S OF 13N BETWEEN 47W AND 60W WINDS 20 KT OR
LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN NE SWELL.
.48 HOUR FORECAST WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.
.CARIBBEAN FROM 10.5N TO 14N BETWEEN 72W AND 79W NE TO E WINDS
20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 12 FT IN NE SWELL. ELSEWHERE S OF 15N
BETWEEN 73W AND 82W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS 8 TO 11 FT IN NE
SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 11N TO 14N BETWEEN 67W AND 78W NE TO E
WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 11 FT IN NE SWELL. ELSEWHERE S OF
15N BETWEEN 70W AND 80W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 9 FT
IN NE SWELL.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 11.5N TO 13.5N BETWEEN 69W AND 78W NE TO
E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS 8 TO 10 FT. ELSEWHERE FROM 10N TO 16N
BETWEEN 68W AND 80W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 9 FT IN NE
SWELL.
.REMAINDER OF AREA WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.
.FORECASTER SCHAUER. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER.



7) Mike, now that I answered your questions and gave you a good deal of info....Would you allow an observation???

I'm wondering HOW IS TO POSSIBLE that 2 of what you referred to as "commercial captains" (who I must assume have enough sailing experience to deliver a Hinckley SW-52), NOT know about the USCG HF weather broadcasts of the US NWS/NOAA Offshore and High-Seas weather forecasts???
Nor, how to easily receive them???
(FYI, these are NOT new....I and many sailors have been using them for decades!!)

Not a big deal....but if they don't know about these forecasts/broadcasts and are now talking about a handheld sat phone, I have to wonder exactly how prepared THEY are....and it might be that YOU, Mike, are better informed and prepared than they are....



Fair winds...

John
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Old 21-03-2014, 18:14   #36
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Re: First time offshore

This comment by John:
"

7) Mike, now that I answered your questions and gave you a good deal of info....Would you allow an observation???

I'm wondering HOW IS TO POSSIBLE that 2 of what you referred to as "commercial captains" (who I must assume have enough sailing experience to deliver a Hinckley SW-52), NOT know about the USCG HF weather broadcasts of the US NWS/NOAA Offshore and High-Seas weather forecasts???
Nor, how to easily receive them???
(FYI, these are NOT new....I and many sailors have been using them for decades!!)

Not a big deal....but if they don't know about these forecasts/broadcasts and are now talking about a handheld sat phone, I have to wonder exactly how prepared THEY are....and it might be that YOU, Mike, are better informed and prepared than they are.... "

seems to be a valid worry. Are you SURE that they really have the creds that they claim?

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Old 21-03-2014, 18:23   #37
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Re: First time offshore

John, Thanks again for all that pertinent info, I really appreciate it. I need to learn this also. As regards the Sat phone, I brought that up (needlessly?) . They are used to having normal weather tech stuff on other boats etc. and are familiar with all that. It's just this boat did not have this equipment on board. In any case the Captain has now ordered the radio and just to reiterate I know both of them for close to 20 yrs and they are well known as top class sailors here in Newport, so no worries there.
Tradewind thanks for your advice also, was just thinking today to get a bit fitter and ready to do whatever is needed and then some and never complain!!
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Old 22-03-2014, 04:08   #38
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Re: First time offshore

Sure it will be a grand trip no doubt - forgot to add that a camera is essential, please, so we can share the highlights when harbour is safely reached and tall tales are being re-lived over a suitable celebratory nip.
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Old 22-03-2014, 04:57   #39
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Re: First time offshore

You are justified in being apprehensive. It's a long trip. Some suggestions:
-Look into what Donald Street has written about sailing to/from the Caribbean via Bermuda. It's sobering. (I've not sailed that far offshore but have read Street's books.)
-Consider hiring a weather router such as Chris Parker, etc. If nothing else, it will make you feel better.
-Just because the 2 guys are commercial captains doesn't mean they are good on a sailboat. Sure, they may have good weather and sea savy, but I'd find out how much time they've spent sailing in the area you're going.
Good luck.
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Old 22-03-2014, 09:57   #40
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Re: First time offshore

Mike,
There are some people in life who always try to find a way NOT to do something rather than finding a way to DO something. It is a personality type and they never accomplish much in life unless there is no risk or challenge. If you are sailing with two competent sailors with previous successful offshore experience on a well found boat, the only thing separating you from the ocean is fear. Deal with your fear rationally not emotionally and go. There will be a day in the future that you will be glad you made this choice. Good luck and good sailing. P.S. And besides, you're Irish . . . the sea is in your blood!
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Old 22-03-2014, 11:08   #41
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Re: First time offshore

Being a little nervous about your first time offshore is perfectly normal. I have done that stretch of water 3 times. The first 2 times with nothing but a VHF. If you buy that small multi-band reciever, you will have enough information. Just remember to keep mumbling REEF EARLY,REEF EARLY, and you will probably have a great trip. Just before WW2, my folks passed up a trip to Hawaii on an engine-less gaff rigged schooner. My dad regretted missing that trip for the rest of his life. Go for it, and even if you learn a whole new definition of being cold, you will always have memories that very few people ever have. Best of Luck to You. ______Grant.
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Old 22-03-2014, 11:39   #42
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Re: First time offshore

Have a great trip! Bring a warm fleece cap with ear flaps. And several pairs of warm gloves...they get wet. And as much warm clothing as you can. Wool socks. First week of May last year, we brought our boat up to Ri from Annapolis, inside route through Long Island Sound, and it was quite cold even there. We had many layers and wore them all. Socks, gloves and hat will keep you comfortable.

Other comments inspired me to dig out my old Sangean ATS 505. It still works. I have used it many times in years past to get HF weather.
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Old 22-03-2014, 11:47   #43
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Re: First time offshore

i was going to respond on the hf issue but john covered it pretty well -- the one thing i would add is get chris parkers frequencys and times and listen -- chris is a wx router out of fla and we used him while we were in the carib and up the east coast of the usa -

no one has mentioned your age so thought i would chime in -- 56 is damn young in my opinion -- i did an atlantic crossing last year at age 67 and the admiral is 66 and there were only 2 of us on board -- so i think you can do it unless you have some physical ailment or are extremely overweight (boy am i going to get an earfull over that one)

but forget the beer -- we have a strict rule on board -- underway no drinking - once the boat is in her slip time to celebrate a new adventure and time to reflect - you will have earned it

and one more question -- great sailors in newport? not sure what that means -- we met a lot of great sailors in the annapolis who could get around cans but could for the life of them not find their way out of the chesapeake -- and let's not even talk about a night sail -- just found your comment on that interesting
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Old 22-03-2014, 12:56   #44
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Re: First time offshore

NOAA weather for New England offshore waters 25-26 March.

.TUE...W OF 70W...SE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT...BECOMING NE AND
INCREASING TO 30 TO 40 KT. E OF 70W...SE WINDS 10 TO 15 KT...
BECOMING NE AND INCREASING TO 40 TO 50 KT. SEAS BUILDING TO 10
TO 15 FT.
.WED...W OF 72W...N TO NE WINDS 35 TO 45 KT...DIMINISHING TO NW
15 TO 25 KT. SEAS BUILDING TO 10 TO 19 FT...THEN SUBSIDING TO 6 TO
12 FT. E OF 72W...N TO NE WINDS 45 TO 60 KT DIMINISHING TO NW 20
TO 30 KT. SEAS BUILDING TO 18 TO 33 FT...THEN SUBSIDING TO 10 TO
19 FT.

The trip from Tortola to Newport is a great trip, If you love sailing and have not made this or a similar voyage then it is not to be missed and to make the trip on world class yacht would indeed be the trip of a lifetime.

However, this time of year I personally would not even think about making this trip without keeping a very close watch on the weather. The planned trip is just 2-3 weeks away so the potential for another Nor'easter like the one forecast for next week will still exist.

Even in a Hinkley 52 I would not intentionally go into an area forecasting 40-60 kt winds and 18-33' seas.
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Old 22-03-2014, 12:57   #45
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Re: First time offshore

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Originally Posted by chuckr View Post
and one more question -- great sailors in newport? not sure what that means -- we met a lot of great sailors in the annapolis who could get around cans but could for the life of them not find their way out of the chesapeake -- and let's not even talk about a night sail -- just found your comment on that interesting
It would be interesting to know what offshore experience the captains have.
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