Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-12-2015, 20:23   #16
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 3,466
Images: 83
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

How about one of these?


__________________

__________________
Nicholson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 20:25   #17
Registered User
 
wrwakefield's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wrangell Island, Alaska
Boat: Nauticat 43
Posts: 861
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Boxer View Post
Hi, this is my first post as a 'new forum member'.
I have been sailing for 20+ years as a share owner in the Ionian and have just purchased a 'whole boat' to spend more time in the area.
We intend to spend more time away from the 'town quays', as lovely as they are, at anchore with a line ashore, not a problem when we have a competent crew to assist, but I would like to master the art of carrying out this manoeuvre for all intent and purpose, single handed.
My wife is not particularly confident so I need to develop a system where I can do it single handed.
Does anyone have any practical advice? That is apart from the obvious, don't try it in the first place!
Our new boat is a Bavaria 38 Cruiser and I am experienced in the normal handling of similar vessels.
Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
Thanks in anticipation.
Nick,

Welcome to the forum! It sounds like you have some wonderful cruising ahead of you.

It has been many years since I had to run a shore-line by myself, but your question reminds me we should practice doing it alone in case of injury, etc.

I should also mention it is our preference not to use shorelines if at all possible because they add additional complication- especially in extenuating circumstances.

I apologize for this being somewhat lengthy, but as I thought through it there are 3 fairly different scenarios I have encountered over the years which require shorelines, and I have consequently developed multiple approaches for each scenario depending upon circumstances. There are likely other, better methods as well. But so far this has worked for me.

First- I would never attempt a solo shoreline if the conditions were anything but calm.

The method I choose depends upon the reason for needing the shore line. The three scenarios I have encountered are: [and there are doubtless other scenarios I have yet to experience...]
  1. a deep bottom sloping steeply up toward the shore
  2. limited swing [not due to other vessels...] in an otherwise acceptable anchorage
  3. a crowded anchorage that has a comparatively level bottom
In the higher latitudes we favor, it is typically the first 2 scenarios we encounter, and in the order listed.

Situation #1; Steep-to bottom: [Depending upon circumstances, the following procedures could also work for the other 2 situations as well.]

My typical method of anchoring in this situation is to back toward shore and anchor on the uphill slope of a steep bottom. This means I have to prevent the boat from drifting over and past the anchor, dragging it downhill and eventually [quickly] dislodging it from the bottom.

Once the anchor is set we keep backing the boat toward shore as close as we can [remember the bottom is coming up fast...] and toss a stern anchor [e.g., a Fortress FX27 or 37 depending...] as far as I can from the vessel, and drift away from shore paying out enough rode until I can soft set that anchor. Then I shorten the primary anchor rode on the bow until the boat is held in slight tension between the two anchors.

Sometimes I incorrectly estimate the middle location between the two anchors when I set the bow anchor [i.e., one anchor is left with inadequate rode or angle, etc.] and have to start over. This can be a simple as leaving the stern anchor fixed and paying out stern rode while motoring away from shore, going past the bow anchor until it dislodges. Keep progressing toward deeper water leaving the bow anchor dangling [remember we are on a steep slope in deep water...] ultimately letting out more bow rode and re-setting the primary anchor. Then I can again back toward shore letting out bow rode and taking in stern anchor rode until I re-set the bow anchor and find that ideal position between the two that will hold the boat while I run a shore line...

Once the shoreline is set, I will slack the stern rode but keep the anchor set if I need to go ashore again to retrieve the shoreline. This keeps the load on the shoreline with the stern anchor as back-up. [I prefer to run the shoreline around a tree or similar object and back to the boat so I can retrieve it from the boat... but that is not always possible...]

Scenarios #2 and 3 can sometimes be dealt with using a modified, somewhat simpler approach. If I can temporarily anchor out on shorter than usual scope [remember I mentioned I would only attempt these solo maneuvers in benign conditions...] and row a long line to shore, then I can either back toward shore retrieving shoreline as I let out bow anchor rode, or pull the bow anchor and reset it as I get closer to shore. If the shoreline can't reach the boat [e.g., I can't temporarily anchor close enough...] then I might buoy the bitter end of the secured shoreline [and anchor it if needed using the dinghy grappling hook anchor] That way I can retrieve it as I bring the boat within range backing toward shore.

Next I'll share some basics about our strategy regarding shorelines:
  • Shorelines need to be long [Our shortest line is 600ft (183m); Soft eyes in both ends of the shorelines allow us to couple them together if extra length is needed.]
  • They need to float
  • They need to be strong enough for the task [Dyneema meets all these criteria. Get a bright color so everyone has a better chance of seeing it.]
  • Flake and store shorelines in vented anchor rode bags or on reels/spools. [Don't try to coil them.]
  • Attach bright floats along the deployed shoreline(s) for visibility- especially if others may be in the area.
  • Shore attachment methods we use include:
  • We keep a couple of lengths of galvanized cables with eyes at each end for use as a necklace around rocks and boulders for attaching the shoreline [Chain can also be used, and stows more readily on the boat, but is much more difficult to handle on a rocky shore...]
  • We also keep some strong 2" nylon webbing vehicle towing straps (eyes on both ends...] for wrapping around sturdy tree trunks [so we don't damage the trees...] We also keep some 2" tubular webbing for the same purpose when we run a single shoreline around a tree and back to the boat so it can be retrieved without another trip to shore...
  • An assortment of Rock climber wedges can be handy as well
  • If there is a sandy beach, set a Danforth style anchor well up the beach and attach the shoreline to that
  • The boat attachment method is typically fair leading the shoreline(s) to primary winch(es) so it is easy to keep adequate tension on the primary anchor, and to adjust for tidal variations
  • If it is a single line going around a tree and back to the boat, one end would be cleated with the other led to a winch

Method of shoreline deployment:

Attach the bitter end(s) to the boat and drop the bag(s) of shoreline(s) in the dinghy. It is much easier to pay out line stowed in the dink [and deal with tangles...] that drag the line from the boat. Row to shore and affix the line(s) as needed.

As you can see, there are lots of variables with these methods, and it is never quite the same twice... And it is very time consuming- especially by yourself...

I hope some of this may be as helpful as I find the descriptions of techniques provided by others.

Cheers!

Bill
__________________

__________________
SV Denali Rose

Short on opinions; focused on research, facts & experience [yours and ours...]
wrwakefield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 20:31   #18
Ancient Mariner
 
spiv's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Circumnavigating, currently in AU
Boat: FP, Salina 14.3m
Posts: 260
Send a message via Skype™ to spiv
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

That's how I have done it many times in Turkey and Greece 'wild' places :

1. make sure the first stern line is a floating one and ready to be deployed.
2. Do a couple of slow recoinessance loops, noting the depth at the anchoring spot and near the shore.
3. Go into deeper water and lower only the length of chain needed at your previously selected anchoring spot.
4. Slowly back the boat towards the shore.
5. As the anchor touches the ground release scope (trying not to drag... )
6. When you get close to shore test the anchor hold at whatever revs you normally test, then reduce revs to minimum.
7. Ensure that the line is cleated and that you have plenty more line free that you need.
8. Put a big bowline to the free end, put it over your shoulder, swim ashore, make fast quickly over a rock or tree.
9. Pull yourself back on board on the cleated line.
10. Adjust scope up or down till happy with distance from shore.
11. Take second line to shore diagonally across first one.
12. Place soft protection around trees or chain around rocks.
13. Harden up on lines and or scope.
14. Enjoy rum or red wine or .....
__________________
spiv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 22:06   #19
Eternal Member
 
monte's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Australia
Boat: Lagoon 400
Posts: 3,650
Images: 1
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

I like to do as Bill described above. Id much rather trust my fortress than a tree for the stern line. Anchor well off, allow for an extra 30m of chain if possible to reverse as close in as possible. Drop the fortress, pay out 15-30m and haul in 15-30m from the primary. One benefit is you can be a little bit further out than the rest of the crowd and its easy to let go of the stern anchor and swing on the primary if space permits. to pick up the stern anchor reverse, pay out the primary, lift on board and then retrieve the primary. All things going smoothly it can be a lot easier than using a dinghy or sending a swimmer ashore. This method might be possible in all scenarios, but its my preferred method
__________________
monte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2015, 23:34   #20
Ancient Mariner
 
spiv's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Circumnavigating, currently in AU
Boat: FP, Salina 14.3m
Posts: 260
Send a message via Skype™ to spiv
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by monte View Post
....Id much rather trust my fortress than a tree for the stern line. ......
That's ok if the bottom is not steep, otherwise the fortress would not hold in a blow, then you'd loose the main anchor as well.

I learned by watching the locals in Turkey (always learn for the locals) where the bays are deep (even 60m) and narrow with the bottom going up steeply.
Once you are sure your main anchor is set and will not drag (difficult to drag up-hill) then get as close to shore as your keel permits and put two strong ropes ashore crossing them over.
The closer you get to the shore the better protection you get from trees and cliffs, then if you get a Maltemi blow of 40~50kn, you can still be sipping on your rum without worrying.

I have anchored incorrectly in my early days and spent the night slowly going up and down the bay waiting for sunrise after my anchor dragged..... all that while the locals slept so deeply that they did not even noticed the blow that made my night a misery....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1040258.jpg
Views:	87
Size:	449.8 KB
ID:	114570  
__________________
Keep smiling
Stefano
spiv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2015, 00:40   #21
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

I agree with wrwakefield who gave loads of good tips--many of which we used while up there in Alaska where he seems to be homeported.

We have 600 ft of 7/8" Polytron that floats and has sufficient strength for our 30T boat, we also have a guide line (that can go to shore first and be used to haul a larger line to shore) made of 1/4" dyneema that floats. We can use a couple other lines we keep aboard as extra shore ties (200ft, and 400 ft roughly) but we've not had the need.

The 600 ft is on a reel at the back of the boat, the dyneema goes in a bag in the dink for the row to shore and is used to haul the polytron. We also have a couple chains (as mentioned) with shackles to wrap around things ashore so the shoreline doesn't need to chafe against a rock or whatever we've tied off to (a tree...)

Have a wonderful time with your new adventures.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2015, 18:08   #22
Registered User
 
Nicholson58's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Live aboard
Boat: Camper & Nicholson58 Ketch - ROXY Traverse City, Michigan No.668283
Posts: 3,466
Images: 83
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by spiv View Post
That's ok if the bottom is not steep, otherwise the fortress would not hold in a blow, then you'd loose the main anchor as well.

..
This is spot-on advice. We have occasionally run into steep hard rock bottoms with zero down-slope holding. If you can position so that the boat is trapped between a solid stern fix and the bow can only drag up hill into cliffs & ledges then you will be solid.

Anchoring in the Benjamins, North Channel, Lake Huron.





__________________
Nicholson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2016, 10:33   #23
Registered User
 
cwyckham's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Niagara 35
Posts: 1,870
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

I've done a fair amount of stern tying as it's common in many anchorages in the PNW.

One bit of advice that a few of the posters above have given and that I've heard numerous other places is to "keep somebody on the boat to keep it in place" or to "leave the boat in reverse in order to keep it in place."

I struggle to understand this. I certainly tried it in the early days, but since you are pulling against the anchor, you have no steerage way and the only force at work is the prop walk slowly pulling you towards you neighbour. How am I supposed to "keep it in place?"

It's been my experience that I'm far better off to just anchor the boat, leave it in neutral and then get the line to shore as quickly as possible before it drifts. I guess if you are lucky or smart, the current or wind might be pushing you in the opposite direction of your prop walk and you can counter with throttle, but I've usually either stern tied in calm conditions or arranged for my bow to be pointing to windward anyways.

So in answer to the OP, the way that we stern anchor, the person on the boat is really only there to motor forwards or fend off if they swing too close to somebody and to cleat off the stern line once it's made fast (ours is on a reel on our stern rail). There's not much else they can do.
__________________
Chris
SailMentor.com - Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat
cwyckham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2016, 10:37   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Winter Germany, Summer Med
Boat: Lagoon 380 S2
Posts: 1,028
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

Steering in reverse while pulling against the anchor works OK on a cat.

Quite well if the rudders are in front of the saildrives.
__________________
rabbi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2016, 13:20   #25
Registered User
 
cwyckham's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Niagara 35
Posts: 1,870
Re: Short handed 'line ashore' anchoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbi View Post
Steering in reverse while pulling against the anchor works OK on a cat.

Quite well if the rudders are in front of the saildrives.
Good point. I'm in a mono

Chris - SailMentor.com
__________________

__________________
Chris
SailMentor.com - Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat
cwyckham is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor, anchoring

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anchoring your dinghy when ashore Elysium Anchoring & Mooring 8 25-04-2013 18:12
Anchoring Your Boat In Remote Places To Go Ashore SunDevil Liveaboard's Forum 17 11-06-2012 19:03
Beneteau 40.7 as a Short-Handed Bluewater Cruiser ? jannw Monohull Sailboats 7 01-06-2012 23:15
Jeanneau Sun Fast 36 - Short-Handed Setup hoppy Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 3 17-09-2010 14:36
SHORT HANDED PACIFIC EAST TO WEST meyermm General Sailing Forum 17 21-01-2008 23:17



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:52.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.