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Old 27-07-2011, 23:30   #1
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Med Mooring

This is our first year in the Med and I am still trying to come to grips with the best way to tie up when the wind blows up and would appreciate some advice from those more experienced.

Are spring snubbers a good idea or not? They seem to be used everywhere but it appears to me to make sure the boat is continually moving. On the other hand without them (and I don't have any .... yet?) the strain on the mooring lines and therefore potential chafe at the cleats appears a problem.

Also, when tying up is it better to pull everything on as hard as possible or allow for some movement? Plus any other tips you may feel are useful.

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Old 28-07-2011, 01:37   #2
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Most of the boats with spring snubbers are unattended. But you will need something to ease the sudden snatch and possible chaff. To avoid chaff you
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Old 28-07-2011, 03:42   #3
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Re: Med Mooring

Sorry I was texting and posted it mid text. The methods used to moor your boat will vary from port to port. So it will require a selection of options. A couple of lengths of chain will protect your mooring lines by taking them of the harbour walls. Also consider slipping a lenght hose pipe over your mooring lines. Rock climbers sometimes use a kevlar sheath to protect their climbing rope. Even an old piece of carpet placed under your lines will help. Mooring lines should have good spring in them, there can be annoying snatch even in a light swell.
Regards Joe
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Old 28-07-2011, 09:22   #4
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Re: Med Mooring

Hi BV,
If you're in the Med already best copy what others are doing. As you'll probably see most do not use any form of snubber or even chain for normal overnight mooring in a marina.
As Joe has said above, both tend to be used when you're leaving the boat for a length of time and don't want to risk wear and or snatching pressures on your lines.
And of course if you've any sharp spots on your own fairleads, best put some effort into getting rid of them by changing what's required. In the meantime wrap your lines to prevent chafe with hose or rags or even (Plastimo make them) Kevlar fabric / velco wraps.
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Old 29-07-2011, 10:27   #5
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Re: Med Mooring

For what it's worth, we've kept our boat in the Med for 10 years and when we moor we use braided nylon mooring ropes with snubbers on them and a s/s chain loop at the end. That's in addition to doubled back lazy lines for when we come to leave. We also put two chain grabbers (with snubbers on them too) on the anchor chain if anchor mooring. Yes, you do tend to move around a little more, but you don't get snatching, it's easier on the anchor and you can sleep without the lines squeaking on your cleats. Even if the wind or swell doesn't make you glad you did, some inconsiderate motor yacht or fishing boat usually will.
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Old 29-07-2011, 14:43   #6
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Re: Med Mooring

It was with the mention of inconsiderate Motor boat owners, I thought I should mention an incident that occured a few weeks ago, when I was moored in Port Soller, Mallorca. I had a crew of 5 on board and luckily I was the first to return after an evening of the boat. I noticed a late arriving motor boat that had pulled in beside us and their genny was running for the airconditioner. As I stepped down into our cabin I started to feel a bit uncomfortable, but I realised what the problem was and got out immediatly, Carbon Monoxide. As it was a calm night the exhaust fumes from the genny next door was not dissipating, but instead was staying close and filling up our boat. We were blessed that nobody stayed onboard and when the crew of the motor boat returned an hour later and told the situation, did we get an apology. They said nothing, stepped aboard and closed the hatch behind them. Nice people. So the lesson learned, is not just to keep an eye on your boat, but check out the neighbours as well. Regards Joe
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Old 07-08-2011, 04:50   #7
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Re: Med Mooring

Thanks for the input, particularly Athene.
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Old 10-08-2011, 18:34   #8
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Re: Med Mooring

If the '59' in your boat description refers to length, i'd say some sort of springs are essential. I used to have a 57ft flybridge and even in a light swell, the springs did alot of work. On a boat your size, there is a HUGE amount of momentum to bring to a dead stop when the rope gets tight.

Anywhere East of southern Spain, i'd say do them as tight as you can to minimise movement. Here (nr Gibraltar) we still have some tidal movement and so I have to allow enough slack to allow for tidal rise and fall. In the rest of the Med' though, that's not a problem.

As mentioned above, many people don't use springs for short stays. This isn't because they don't want / need them, it's a matter of convienience. Metal springs, especially with chains and shackles, are heavy and not easy to secure quicly to mooring rings and so are usualy used by boats who are resident there. What i'd recommend for those instances is a pair of those rubber snuffers. They can be placed anywhere allong the length of the mooring line and so can remain in situe before and after mooring. A simple bowline can be used to tie up to the mooring ring or simply tie the end to a bollard for short stays.
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Old 13-08-2011, 05:24   #9
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Re: Med Mooring

Thanks Simon, exactly the type of information I was looking for.

Brownie
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Old 13-08-2011, 07:46   #10
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By the way , a tip, bring up the slime line aand secure it so that it gets as much sun as possible, bleaches it off nicely after a day or two ( if you're staying a while ) much nicer to handle

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Old 13-08-2011, 08:02   #11
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Re: Med Mooring

And another tip, if you're comming back to the same berth, tie the end near the bow to your neighbours boat, either on a cleat or to their rail via an extra piece of line. (always good manners to check they don't mind of course)

That way, when you come back in, you just need to undo it and tie off on the bow. Much nicer than walking it the whole length of the boat and getting dirt everywhere.

Also, for people new to Med mooring, a decent pair of gloves are ESSENTIAL. Most lines will have barnicals, etc. on them and they can shread your hands if not carefull.
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Old 13-08-2011, 14:13   #12
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...Also, for people new to Med mooring, a decent pair of gloves are ESSENTIAL. Most lines will have barnicals, etc. on them and they can shread your hands if not carefull.
Spent a lot of time hauling slime lines never used gloved. Did always wash my hands in disinfectant after though.

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Old 13-08-2011, 15:34   #13
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Re: Med Mooring

Your medal is in the post......
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Old 13-08-2011, 17:12   #14
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Re: Med Mooring

Have you guys thought of using a slime line carrier. take a piece of rope and tie a bowline on one end. Then take the rope and feed a piece of hose over it on the other end. Finish off with a bowline on the other end. when you pick up the line then slide the slime line holder under the slimeline and walk to where you want to attach the slimeline. Works pretty well.
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Old 14-08-2011, 04:26   #15
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Re: Med Mooring

Cool idea if you can't tie it to next door's boat.
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