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Old 18-06-2015, 18:04   #16
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Yes, it is another example of a person so new and so unfamiliar that she does not really know where to begin or what questions to ask..and if her budget is so tight that she is going to Coasta Rica with an outboard..perhaps held together by chewing gum and bailing wire..???..that it is almost an impossiblity for more experienced and well-meaning sailors to even kn ow where to begin to provide helpful advice....There are so many posts such as this here on CF and they are both exasperating and sometimes encouraging at the same time. Dreamers.....dreamers....but as Thoreau said,"Build your castles in the air and then make the foundations down to earth"..or something like that...In any event Katie, if you cannot afford installing or reparing an inboard engine--you will regret making such a trip with an outboard-and if you cannot really afford what this boat may cost, just be prepared for all kinds of difficult, irritating, unnerving and perhaps dangerous situations.....
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Old 18-06-2015, 19:04   #17
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

As I plan my great escape in four years
I've been looking at lots of boat adds and it seems as if there is a real
trend developing in older 27 to 30 footers where the engine is gone
replaced with an outboard. For Caribbean cruising
Would an outboard on let's say an older Catalina 30 or Ericson 27
Be a deal breaker and if so why?
Lots of these retrofits have remote controls and hydraulic lifts
I have an outboard on my Oday Mariner 19'. No Problem
4.5 hp long shaft

Katie
Go For It
But take a sailing course first
Then try and get a crew slot for a trip or two
My personal plan which was shaped by some great advice I got here
Has led me to purchase a day sailer, crew on some long trips
Read books, take some correspondence courses to learn navigation
(Boatsafe course was great)
And I'm off to the UK in a week to earn my RYA Day Skipper and ICC
Might even try for Coastal Yachtmaster
Live your life with no regrets and only reasonable fears
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Old 18-06-2015, 19:16   #18
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

I have had the inboard checked out, and am planning to get a second opinion...however, the first opinion was that it would require a complete rebuild.
At the moment, I really don't have the money for that.
I also recently had the outboard checked out and serviced. I can assure you it is not held together by chewing gum and bailing wire.
I am definitely taking a course this summer, and have every intention of taking every opportunity to gain experience and knowledge before making such a trip. I won't do it completely clueless.
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Old 18-06-2015, 20:09   #19
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

I would not suggest you don't go if you have little money, but there really are certain things that will simply take money--or else lots of begging, scrounging, goodwill of others, luck, sweat or getting into difficult and hazardous situations.....dont hurry this thin if you dont have the proverbial cruising kitty...or you will have to rely on your parents or the goodwill of strangers. There is no hurry--you are 23! If you cannot afford the engine repairs, then can you afford sails, rigging, safety gear, bottom paint etc etc???? You may nnot have the slightest idea what all these things cost--but you still have to eat....buy fuel....clothes...and what else?
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Old 18-06-2015, 20:25   #20
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

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I would not suggest you don't go if you have little money, but there really are certain things that will simply take money--or else lots of begging, scrounging, goodwill of others, luck, sweat or getting into difficult and hazardous situations.....dont hurry this thin if you dont have the proverbial cruising kitty...or you will have to rely on your parents or the goodwill of strangers. There is no hurry--you are 23! If you cannot afford the engine repairs, then can you afford sails, rigging, safety gear, bottom paint etc etc???? You may nnot have the slightest idea what all these things cost--but you still have to eat....buy fuel....clothes...and what else?
Totally, totally agree. I think the out-board idea would be a nightmare over time, and in some situations dangerous. If you are not in a position to get the boat in a safe, useable condition to begin with, you are not in a position to make the trip. And yes, you need to figure on a bank-roll. Labor is very cheap in the places you are going. But you are young and you have time to learn and save. Knowledge and experience are your biggest allies. If you do it right, you will have memories that will last a lifetime. Read every old post on the CF concerning this subject plus on countless other sites on the web. Good luck.
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Old 18-06-2015, 21:05   #21
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Three Jesters on D dock? Stop over to F14 this WE and I will pass along some suggestions wo any judgement.
Ed on Sea Castle
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Old 18-06-2015, 21:11   #22
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

No doubt that an inboard is better than an outboard when cruising. Also having a good engine can get you out of a tight spot, maybe save your bacon.

On the other hand, there is a certain well known cruising couple that has circumnavigated with no engine at all. I am not suggesting this as the way to go and in fact think going without an engine is... well let me just say not my preference.

At the very least going without an engine does bring some serious limitations on where and when you can take a boat and requires some compromises, sacrifice and a much higher level of skill and experience to cruise safely.

So cruising with an outboard. Lots of people have done it and lived to tell the tale. It will require more careful planning, attention to tight spots, docking, strong currents and more so a new cruiser would be well advised to get some experience and carefully learn the limitations of his or her boat.

Yes there is a tendency on this (and other forums) for some to encourage any newbie/dreamer to go for it, regardless. In this case seems to me that Katie is going at this with realistic plans and isn't planning to head up sewage creek with no means of propulsion. So I say keep working at the plan. Work hard to learn what you need to know to make a safe voyage.
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Old 18-06-2015, 21:43   #23
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Hola, First, I wish you well...follow your heart but do it in a safe and sane manner!
I am in Mexico on the Gulf so if you want to stop by gimme a holler...One thing though...What exactly do you mean by la espero?? Wouldn't Esperanza be correct?
Anyway, be safe and happy...Catch ya l8r and God Bless.
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Old 18-06-2015, 21:54   #24
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

I love a 23 Year old girl with spunk. I met these two in No Name Harbor the day before they crossed to Bimini behind us. Katie, you might want to check out their blog. Maybe even contact them. I'm sure they could give you some helpful thoughts. KATIE & JESSIE on a boat | aboard lovely Louise…

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Old 19-06-2015, 17:23   #25
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Katie, congratulations on having not only a dream, but also a boat! Lot’s of good advice and differing opinions here. But you will have to decide which of it applies to you. One thing, though; if you wait until you think everything is perfect and everyone agrees you and your boat are completely ready, you will likely never go.
Keep in mind that when you leave, you will only be going down the ICW to the next town! There are cities, marinas, boatyards and all manner of civilization all along the way. And you will be learning and fixing and preparing your boat all the way to Lake Worth or Key West. And then you can step it up by heading to the Bahamas. Still not the end of the Earth.
Have you ever been a waitress or bar maid? With those skills you can get a job anywhere to refill your cruising boat kitty. There are probably thousands of bars and restaurants within walking distance of the ICW.
And consider taking a friend with you. Everything is scarier alone.

My 2 cents worth on your engine: An outboard hung on the transom of a sailboat, especially a 34 footer, is not the best way to go. But it is not without it’s own advantages. Chief among them is the relative cost and ease of replacing it if needed. If you decide to keep the outboard, you will need to become a better sailor. You have a boat known for sailing well. So learn to sail it well.
Motoring against strong currents, wind, and steep waves was not an option for Columbus. And it will not be an option for you. You will have to learn to predict tides and currents and wind and seas and work with them rather than against them. You will wait till conditions favor your direction of travel. Or decide to travel in the direction conditions favor!
Your motor will be for moving around in marinas, quiet anchorages and motoring in calm no wind situations. You’ll have to learn the limitations of your boat and plan ahead.

But, I think you may have the wrong outboard motor. Could your motor be a Johnson 28 SPL? I’m unaware of a 28sp. And i’m fairly certain Johnson didn’t make the 28 in a sailboat model. It would be called a Sailmaster, most likely. And it would have a decal of a sailboat on the cowl. If it’s the original cowl! I could be wrong. If it is a 28 SPL, it’s a great motor. But not for your boat. It is geared and propped for a light weight, high speed planing hull . Not a 15,000 lb sailboat going 5 knots. On your boat it will begin to cavitate at half throttle, or perhaps not even turn up to half it’s rated RPM at full throttle. And it weighs about 125 lbs, which is too heavy for you to lift it off or back on.

If you decide to stay with an outboard, I think you should trade your 28 for a purpose designed sailboat motor. Like the Johnson 8 or 9.9 Sailmaster. or other similar style in another brand. It will come with a longer shaft length to put your prop deeper in the water. And it will be geared lower and have a larger diameter lower pitch prop designed for moving heavy loads at low speed. And if you buy an older one in good condition, it will only weigh about 80 lbs. Still damn heavy, but better than 125!
Most importantly, it will work better. perhaps you can even find someone who will let you try theirs and help you make the swap.
Beware the newer ones with more bells and whistles. Yes, they have electric starters, high output alternators and some are 4 strokes. But they weigh as much or more than your current motor. They also cost more.

Speaking of costs, I bet you can sell your present motor for more than an 8 or 9.9 sail master will cost. Maybe 3 x as much.
But you can do better still. If you are committed to using an outboard, and your inboard is in fact a dead player… yank it! Call it blasphemy if you want, but I say take it and all its assorted attachments right out. The motor, transmission, shaft and prop, thru hulls, valves and hoses, shaft log, controls and cables, exhaust system, wires, mounts, gauge panel, the works. It’s hundreds of pounds of dead weight taking up space you could use for storage. Then put the whole oily, rusty mess up for sale. Believe me, someone will buy it!

You can clean out your fuel tank and install a proper gasoline outboard fuel system including a spin on type fuel filter/ water separator, new USCG approved for ethanol fuels fuel line and squeeze bulb, new fittings and a blower fan. And don’t forget the 40 year old O-ring in the fuel filler cap. This is a much nicer system to live with than the usual plastic tank in the cockpit so often seen in outboard powered boats. Just be sure NOTHING leaks, or KABOOM! The vast majority of boats around the globe run on gas, and most of them do not blow up. Especially since your motor is no longer in the boat.
And if some boatyard sage says, “well I would NEVER sail in a gasoline engined boat, it’s UNSAFE!” Just ask them if they have propane on board, or plastic jerry cans full of gasoline for the dinghy lashed on deck….…. In fact, your boat may have been originally equipped with an Atomic Four running, yep, gasoline!

Your boat will experience a net weight loss in the back end and likely sail better. Even with the motor on the transom. And here is where the outboard option really starts looking better. You also get to plug up three holes in your hull that can potentially sink your boat; the cooling water intake, the prop shaft, and the exhaust outlet. And you get decreased maintenance and repair expenses. The trade off is motoring power. And maybe some battery charging capability. Your choice, Captain.

I bet your local community college offers an outboard motor repair course. Take the first one you can get into. It will help you tremendously in shopping for a replacement motor. And sooner or later save you a bunch of money when something goes wrong with whatever you have. If there’s even a mechanic around to pay.

Good luck, and don’t wait till you’re old to have a life
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Old 06-11-2016, 16:35   #26
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

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Originally Posted by Paul Annapolis View Post
Katie Get rid of the outboard! Make sure you have enough $ hid away for boat parts and then cruise down the ICW....stop along the way and work and learn to live aboard the boat. Meet other sailors--and read, read, read...and as a professional instructor--I highly recommend professional lessons. You can learn more in a few days from an experienced pro who has been there and done that than you can from weeks and weeks of trial and error and endangering yourself on your own. And of course, as a 23 year old woman you have both advantages and disadvantages in this sailing world. Have your wits about you..but don't push your budget or your timeframe. You are 23. Take it slow and easy....arrive alive..and get rid of that outboard NOW!!! Please..
Last time I looked the ICW stops at the US border. After that it's Mexican waters.
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Old 07-11-2016, 18:21   #27
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Dave 22q....Last time you looked--eh? (five points for snarkiness....) I have no idea what your comment means--Mexico?? What are you trying to say please?
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Old 07-11-2016, 18:30   #28
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Re: Sailing from the East Coast of U.S. to Costa Rica!

Katie,
I think it's a super goal. Aside from all the suggestions above... I would recommend you contact a few of the young ladies who have done some serious sailing. And they are several and they are quite impressive. Katie and Jessie come to mine, Laura Dekker is another. Why don't you reach out them them and see if they have some suggestions or advice.

Without being disrespectful, youth tends to be less prudent and careful, more bold and fearless than older folks. I would urge you to read, watch vids, and sail with some old salts a bit before casting off your lines.

Good luck!
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