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Old 08-11-2019, 11:50   #136
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by sck5 View Post
.

In the USA you need to call the number if the Customs office isnt open or nearby. No reason not to and lots of trouble if they catch you.
Which is going to involve anchoring, going ashore and finding a phone, surely.

Not everyone carries a satphone and or US sim card.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:21   #137
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by theDangerz View Post
Lest week we literally got denied entry into St Vincent & the Grenadines because the length of time since checking out of Grenada was too long. After checking out we had some engine troubles and slow played things and then figured "whats the worst that can happen?" and made the crossing and tried to check in.
I've never needed it ("sail fast and eat well" remember *grin*) but the track from my chartplotter, from OpenCPN, and from my SPOT tracker all in agreement and not showing any inappropriate stops would seem to be good data for a "go slow" transit.

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Which is going to involve anchoring, going ashore and finding a phone, surely.

Not everyone carries a satphone and or US sim card.
I don't get your point. We've been in and out of lots of ports of entry with no phone check-in. That's the standard. What's the big deal? You try on VHF 16. If that doesn't work the skipper goes ashore and calls in for directions. You do get all the phone numbers for your next port and bail-outs from Noonsite before you leave, don't you? The opportunity to call in, email in, text in, use smartphone apps (like ROAM in the US) is a privilege and a service. We should be grateful when available and accommodating when we have to jump through the normal hoops.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:23   #138
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

Many years ago I went to St Kits and anchored with m yellow flag out and rowed to the dock to check in. All perfectly propper. While checking in the official asked where I was going next and I told him of a cove on his island where I was heading to visit a pen pal that I had never met. He said, "NO, you cannot go there!!" Very emphatically. I asked why and he became very agitated and explained that it was a smugglers cove and he had people watching it and if I went there he would arrest me and put me in jail. It was NOT just a simple warning. His tone was of a THREAT. He meant it. Needloess to say, I dropped the conversation and finished the check in and never visited my friend. The danger here would be for someone coming from outside and anchoring there without check in. Check in allowed me to avoid this possible incarceration.



I would NEVER avoid a proper check in and check out. Its a fools mission. And I am surprised that anyone would do it and more so to announce his intention to do it!!!!


Not sure why I answered this question, I should have just let Darwins theory eliminate the threat to the gene pool.
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:01   #139
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

We also follow procedures when exiting and entering any country, large or small. Period.

Delivering a race boat back from Cabo San Lucas ( southern tip of Baha , Mexico).

Arriving at the marina in Mexico, To exit and have proper papers we hired an agent, who took care of the whole mess. I think it was about $ 25.00 back then.

Rough guess was about 400 miles up the coast, to replenish fuel, and water in
Turtle Bay, Mexico, ( Very small fishing village ). Then a few more hundred miles to San Diego, where we checked in with U.S. Customs, and yes we flew the yellow Q flag. Left the next morning for Los Angeles Harbor, many, many hour passage.

Now for a wake up call for the O.P.

We sailed into Turtle Bay, Baha Mexico, during a squaw . We anchored and check with people ashore, and we figured we were all set. We were, sort of.

The next day, mid morning, a govt, vessel pulled up along side. Four uniformed
military personel on board, tied side to, and boarded our vessel. They carried short barreled assault rifles, and holstered hand guns. Looked like " nines' to me.

They wanted to know where we left, and had to produce the vessels documents, and our passports, and the paper work from entering Mexico and leaving Cabo. We had flown down to pick up the race boat.

They wanted to know if we had any drugs or armementos ( guns ), and searched the vessel very thoroughly . Thankfully all of our paper work was in order, thanks to having a professional take care of it. Oh, and , well ahead, I warned my crew, buddies, that absolutely no drugs of any kind were allowed on board. I'd put em ashore along that deserted coast line, and I mean deserted, or help the mexican authorities hook em up and haul em off. Apparently that warning was a good plan.

If we had not followed procedures, it would not have been a good outcome.

We could speak some spanish, me from two years in high school ,and living in southern california, and some of the other crew was more spanish capable. One guy owned a bar in Santa Ana, and had Hispanic staff working for him. So, we could communicate a bit. Which helped. Everything was friendly and easy, no problemo.

The OP, has received some very sensible suggestions and the reasons for those suggestions. Follow proper procedures..

One last bit of advice. Also many years ago, I was an Air Combat Instructor for Air Combat U.S.A. We had two of our SF -260's Nato Light Attack Aircraft, and were performing at a War Bird Air Show...... Lots of great WW 2, and later aircraft .

The manager of the show, was speaking to all of the pilots in a pre show flight briefing.

He went over the course rules, and as the briefing ended, we started to walk out of the large hanger, he shouted and stopped us in our tracks. We all turned around...

ONE MORE THING.....

DON'T GET DUMB !

That summed it up pretty well.

As it does for this subject.
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:06   #140
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by BBViper View Post
Just wondering what the risk would be of sailing to a new country, for example a Caribbean island, and not checking in with customs/immigration, etc. Of not paying fees, going through all the paperwork. Just sailing up to a remote part of an island, hanging on anchor or even going to shore for provisions or restaurant. If no official found out and you moved on to the next island, much of a risk? Certainly if yo were 'discovered' there could be fines and possible confiscation maybe but what is the likelihood of being discovered?
You have to be joking right!! It's people like you who make it harder for the 99% of us genuine cruisers who respect the rights & laws of the countries that we visit. Really nothing more to be said.
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:08   #141
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

Try turning the table.
What if every sailor from every country around the world landed in the US without checking in. How would you feel about that and how would your customs react. I believe the answer to the last part can be found by googling Ďwhat happens when ICE finds an undocumented personí cause thatís what you are when you enter a sovereign country without checking in.

Respect others regardless if you feel they donít deserve it because later in retrospect you will realize they did.
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:17   #142
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by Auspicious View Post
.



I don't get your point. We've been in and out of lots of ports of entry with no phone check-in. That's the standard. What's the big deal?

.
The standard?
Hey, I'm just going off of the US Customs page.

Quote:
. Reporting Requirements
CBP has designated specific reporting locations that are staffed during boating season for pleasure boats to report their arrival and be inspected by CBP. The master of the boat must report to CBP telephonically and be directed to the nearest Port of Entry to satisfy the face-to-face requirement, or report to the nearest designated reporting location along with the boat's passengers for inspection.
https://www.cbp.gov/travel/pleasure-...-boat-overview

Add: OK, I see further down the page where they mention an app.
Yeah, I could download that and hope that my gsm phone works in what appears to be a mostly CDMA country.

Quote:
. In the US, Sprint, Verizon, and US Cellular use CDMA. AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM. Most of the rest of the world uses GSM. The global spread of GSM came about because in 1987, Europe mandated the technology by law, and because GSM comes from an industry consortium
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:27   #143
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

I noticed several comments like, "they are understaffed". You dont have to have a big staff when you offer everyone half of the fine if they turn in violators!!!! Makes everyone living on the island "Paid Staff"
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Old 08-11-2019, 13:46   #144
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

If you are asking this question you stay in US or whatever. Time spent trying to clear in or out is hard enough without some ass making it harder and under more scrutiny.
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Old 08-11-2019, 14:10   #145
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

Had it happen to us while in the queue waiting to clear out of Neiafu in Tonga. Some clown hadn't cleared out of Nuku'alofa or cleared into the top group. Well after an hour or more of listening to this idiot that thought it was his right to move around this beautiful island nation without checking in. Talk about embarrassing & we & about a dozen other cruisers were all thinking that the government will be making clearance in & out harder.
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If you are asking this question you stay in US or whatever. Time spent trying to clear in or out is hard enough without some ass making it harder and under more scrutiny.
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Old 08-11-2019, 14:51   #146
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

I would see boats anchor off Jolly Harbor over night and then sail off in the morning without apparently checking in.

I sailed into Guadeloupe, rode the bus into town, returned and left, never checking in, since I couldn't find the Harbour master. I checked the office when I arrived and left, he wasn't there.

In Great Inagua, I checked in, so I had no problem. A Local boat from Jamaica was not so lucky, Customs impounded his entire cargo and sent him packing with out letting him come ashore. Apparently Jamaicans must check in at Nassau.

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Old 08-11-2019, 15:04   #147
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I have arrived at night, anchored, left next morning without going ashore. I think that's legal... ?


NOPE! ILLEGAL. Your in their sovereign waters.
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Old 08-11-2019, 15:24   #148
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

I have a good friend I went to school and played ball with retire a year or two ago from the USCG. He was the highest civilian there who dealt with CBP as one of his areas of responsibility.

The government knows of every boat coming to the US because of all the modern electronics, satellites, etc. Whether you are intercepted or contacted depends on their manpower situation at that time. They know you are here.

In my opinion, no matter what country, you would be a fool not to do what you are supposed to do.
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Old 08-11-2019, 16:36   #149
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

Benz said it best: “It's wise to make every reasonable effort, and to have all your papers always in order, as much as it is in your power”.

Unless you enjoy being detained and having your boat search with crowbars if needed to obtain full access, and If you end up having anything onboard that’s not allowed like a firearm or some recreational drugs for instance you my not be leaving anytime soon and your boat could be seized.

Being a goodwill ambassador for your own country and your fellow cruisers is the only way to go, and it all starts with knowing and respecting the laws of your cruising grounds.
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Old 08-11-2019, 16:51   #150
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Re: Risk of not checking in, new country / island

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Originally Posted by BBViper View Post
Just wondering what the risk would be of sailing to a new country, for example a Caribbean island, and not checking in with customs/immigration,
If you go ashore before clearing customs in New Caledonia. The skipper gets an instant fine of USD15.000, every ashore crew USD5.000 and the boat gets confiscated. Than the skipper get taken to court on top of that and gets a prison sentence.
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