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Old 07-08-2010, 08:52   #16
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--- Marinas are for people who don't sail much; don't listen to them. And yes, I'm in a marina so I know what I'm talking about. ---
Rebel Heart -
Are you criticizing your self?
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Old 07-08-2010, 12:53   #17
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Rebel Heart -
Are you criticizing your self?
Sadly yes but the egg timer to get the hell out of here is ticking down slowly but surely. We'll be out on a mooring hopefully in 6-12 months and the hell out of Dodge in 24-36 months. Not that I'm counting.
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Old 03-09-2010, 18:03   #18
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Are you set for the 99% before you prepare for the 1%?

I've read Coles, Bowditch and others. Its good knowledge, just not applicable in 99% of the situations. Riding out a gale for 14 hours with 15' waves at short intervals is a lot more likely than hurricane or Fastnet conditions. If you are confident you are set for the 99% then by all means prepare for the 1%.

I saw the one comment about personal EPIRBs, but nothing about harnesses, life vests, jacklines, tethers, ditch bags, weather gear">foul weather gear, spare radios, spare batteries, lights, first aid kits and what to do if a lightning strike takes out all your installed electronics. Even survival suits depending upon where you sail. I've had far more opportunity to wear harnesses than tow sea anchors, warps of line or pour oil upon the waters.

That said, I like an inflatable jacket with integral harness. Spinlock or SOSpenders. Yes.. I know people worry about the inflatables, but I religiously change the cartridges and test them. The theory being that the jacket you wear is the one that saves you. These are comfortable and proven. I have Musto offshore foul weather gear and love it.

I have a ditch bag pre-loaded with:

binoculars
bagged water
dried food
flare gun, shells and both this years flares and 2 years prior flares and shells (they are expired but they would probably work, and I'm still legal)
small first aid kit for the ditch bag
handheld Garmin GPS48
handheld VHF
spare batteries for GPS and VHF
(other stuff of a similar nature).

Finally, I was given the Adventure Series Marine Medical 3000 first aid kit as a retirement present a couple of years ago. Its expensive, but I could probably perform surgery with the thing. Its consistently rated high by almost any reviewer.

One comment on life rafts. When Hylas builds the stern rail, they can build a launch rack for Winslow or other rafts. Its much easier than hauling it from forward of the mast to someplace when the boat is pitching all over the place. Think about how you would launch it.

Rick

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Old 03-09-2010, 19:59   #19
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We have a discussion of ditch bags here: Grab Bag

And the adventure medical kits are impressive, for people with little to no knowledge, as do most commercially available kits. They have too little of the necessary, useful and expensive things, way too much of the cheap, marginally useful things. A 500-piece kit that has a ziplock bag and 499 tiny bandaids isn't useful (not that the AM kit is so - but it's not a complete kit by any stretch of the imagination).

If you're serious about a medical (not first aid) kit onboard the first thing to do is get some training in first aid - afloat and in austere conditions. If your voyages take you more than a few hours cruise from first world shores then I'd suggest a Wilderness First Responder (or higher level) course, which teaches you how to deal with a victim/patient for longer than it takes for the ambulance to arrive after you dial 9-1-1.

And then, with a more thorough knowledge base you can purchase a kit with useful items. One site I particularly like (for safety gear as well) is Oceanmedix.com .....for the Coastal Cruiser, Ocean Voyager and Commercial Fisherman They can fix you up with appropriate medical equipment for your needs and expertise.
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Old 03-09-2010, 20:15   #20
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Trysail

I would get a trysail, cheap insurance and it will save your main. Even adding an additional track is not too bad. Plenty are available used, but you can get a new one very inexpensively. Call Mack Sails in FL for a quote. Practice hoving to in conditions that you can handle, wind usually is not the problem, it's the waves. It is very important to have the boat balanced. Also make sure you have some form of seasick meds on board and a stash of easily prepared food.

Good luck.
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Old 03-09-2010, 20:40   #21
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On Exit Only we have:

An eighteen foot diameter Para Anchor International Parachute Sea Anchor - used once in anger.

We also have parachute sea anchor chainplates on our bows. Read this article to get the details.

Blue Water Catamaran - Exit Only Sails Offshore Around The World.* Captain Dave - Privilege 39

A Jordan Series Drogue -never used.

Abbott Drogue - used once.
ABBOTT DROGUE

406 MHz EPIRB

6 man Givens Liferaft
THE FACTS OF LIFE RAFTS* Imagine that you were flying in an airplane and the stewardess came to you

2 Go Bags with hand pump reverse osmosis watermaker

One 39 foot catamaran which in an inverted state coverts into one of the most expensive life rafts in the world.

That is what we have on board Exit Only. So far, so good.
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Old 03-09-2010, 22:16   #22
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what's your philosophy on when practice becomes dangerous?

12kt more wind than the last big wind I practiced in (exposed waters of course.)
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Old 04-09-2010, 01:39   #23
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Adventure Medical Kits

You'll remember I was given the kit as a retirement present. Not sure I would have spent that much personally. I might have put something together like I did for my ditch bag without the fancy zip lock bags and labeling. From your username, I'm assuming you are a medical professional. I've had some first aid training, but make no claims about professional skills. . As such the pre-packaged components and the books are useful. I agree that a course in likely sailing situations and near-shore/off-shore application of aid is important.

Before going offshore into storm conditions as the master of a vessel, I would crew in a race or cruise on another vessel with someone you trust as a good master in all conditions. Nothing teaches like an experienced professional and the right conditions.

Rick
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Old 04-09-2010, 03:02   #24
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A good look at the RYA or YNZ regs for category 1 offshore, is a pretty good spec for what you need...plus a sound boat and experienced crew...nothing like doing it to find out what works and what doesn't...its all very well to have all the gear, but how do you deploy it...who does what...how do you belay those drogue lines...are your cleats strong enough ?...sure its only 1% or less...but thats the 1% that can do you in !

Put everything away in watertight bags...you think your boat is water tight ?..it ain't....
Tie everything down EVERYTHING..inside and out...keep the decks as clear as possible....don't carry jerrycans on the rail tied to a board...think about it....5 jugs of 20l each ..that's 100kg tied to your lifelines..if a big wave hits that...goodbye stanchions...and goodbye to your spare whatever you had in those jugs !
Prepare for the worst and the bad won't seem so bad..practise in the worst stuff you can find...then when you do go to sea you will be prepared ?...nope...but it will give you some idea !
Its not that bad...most of the time ...but when it is you need all the help you can get.
98% of the time its great !!
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Old 05-09-2010, 16:07   #25
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if you have a moden underbody, fin keel with spade rudder, or even small skeg mounted rudder, forget lying ahull or even hove-too, it rarely works well in the real sea state where your likely to need it.

all modern boats with these features need "active" handling in a storm,

( a) running off, with or without streaming wraps or a series drouge
(b) jogging, forereaching slowly under engine storm canvas.

in my experience, sailing with modern diesels and enough fuel jogging is a very good technique. with the engine just about tickover, storm canvas set, the boat will forereach at about 1-2 knots, the bow will be pointing into the dangerous bits and often the boat can actually be left to the autopilot ( unless there is big breaking waves).

running off is the other technique, unfortunately this needs an attentive helmsman and hence it can tire the crew quickly. but often its the only resort, obviously you need sea room.aslo running off can prolong your time in the storm (wheras forereaching tends to minimise it).

when running off its sometimes neccessary to slow the boat , hence the use of towed wraps or drogues, becareful not to slow the boat too much down to around 4knots is enough IMHO.

practice in open water with winds upto 30 knots, more then that and mistakes can be costly and dangerous
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Old 05-09-2010, 18:58   #26
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It's not the wind that gets boats into trouble, it's the seas....
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Old 05-09-2010, 19:31   #27
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I think you did great. Marinas are for people who don't sail much; don't listen to them. And yes, I'm in a marina so I know what I'm talking about.

You learned more, you upgraded your boat, and you're alive and coming back for more. More than anyone else did on your dock that day.

Right on! Any landing you can walk away from's a good one!

But remember sea room can be important. It's the land that hurts.
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Old 06-09-2010, 16:05   #28
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if you have a moden underbody, fin keel with spade rudder, or even small skeg mounted rudder, forget lying ahull or even hove-too, it rarely works well in the real sea state where your likely to need it.

all modern boats with these features need "active" handling in a storm,
thanks for bringing that up - it's something i was wondering about.

maybe this is naive, but i was thinking that if you've got a para anchor and pardee bridal, that it'd be all but impossible for your boat to to do anything but drift leeward, regardless of your keel design... not true?
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Old 07-09-2010, 19:50   #29
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a partial failure of the port side upper shroud. the rigger said it was overdue for replacement anyhow...
If one shroud or stay is due, then they probably ALL are ...

Hopefully your rigger advised you to consider replacing the whole lot?
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Old 07-09-2010, 20:44   #30
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If one shroud or stay is due, then they probably ALL are ...

Hopefully your rigger advised you to consider replacing the whole lot?
indeed.
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