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Old 01-08-2008, 06:33   #1
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PDQ Antares 44i

I can only find a few things i donīt like with this catamaran.

1. Price
2. Want to steer in the sun sometimes
3. Galley down

Looks like the perfect cruiser for Scandinavian and Canadian Climate!

Any comments about this catamaran?

Good and bad....

Luxury Cruising Catamarans: Antares Yachts

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Old 01-08-2008, 07:47   #2
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It's three to four foot narrower than most other cats it length and has very low sail area (small engine) to go along with the narrow hull to maintain stability.
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Old 01-08-2008, 08:54   #3
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Although... it's halfway to Europe right now.
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:14   #4
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I don't know if it makes any difference but I think the one crossing the Atlantic was built by the now defunct PDQ. I don't think Antares has built too many boats.
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:21   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ldrhawke View Post
It's three to four foot narrower than most other cats it length and has very low sail area (small engine) to go along with the narrow hull to maintain stability.
Yep, 29,5 inches or 75 cm is the difference between Antares and Orana. I canīt find information about the hull width.

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Although... it's halfway to Europe right now.
Captain Sully's Marine Repair and Instruction I can always talk to this man if i need help.
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:21   #6
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Although... it's halfway to Europe right now.
And this boat circumnavigated the world....soooo. I just feel the hull is on the narrow side for it's waterline.

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Old 01-08-2008, 09:29   #7
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And this boat circumnavigated the world....soooo. I just feel the hull is on the narrow side for it's waterline.

Touche
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:31   #8
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I've been on them dozens of times. I think you'll find the galley down with the settee insert down and the overhang of the cabin top is really fantastic, the cook is by no means removed from the action, and they now have 3 times the counter space of any galley up and you have far more floor space and better "living room" than any galley up could hope to provide. If you really want a galley up, go on board the Anteres, see the excellent layout of space in the settee area, and then cut it in half in your mind by having a countertop coming straight through the middle or try entertaining guests while you have two people who are prepping and cooking in the same space. Then go below and look at the huge expanse of galley, and again, cut that in half for a galley up and see how happy your wife would be. She really has to stand in the galley to appreciate how the open space above really opens up that space. The galley was designed by a gourmet chef, it's fantastic. It's funny, but every where else in life we see the reasons to have a seperate galley for space, controling the mess, so the spills on the floors aren't immediately tracked everywhere, but on catamarans people have been sold by the ex charter brokers saying how "the cook would be removed in some dark hot hole" in the hulls with galley down. Galley down came up with one reason, they needed the space in the hulls for multiple heads that they need for a charter boat. Your wife will find that she can have direct eye and voice contact with everyone up above through the settee cutout, immense room, and she can also have a private conversations with other cooks in the galley, control the mess a bit more and have the space she'll expect and need to make something fun. No one on a PDQ 42 would say it's what's commonly described as a "galley down", it's more like being in one big split level room.

Engines are amidships with straight shafts which eliminates some of the complexities of the outdrives. It also has several times the amount of space in dedicated water tight compartments than any catamaran which are known for charters, and that's really crucial. Stand in the forward starboard bow locker, look at the crash compartment under your feet and then note that your standing in one huge water tight chamber. Then step aboard any boat that serves charter service in the same area.

The keels are sacrificial with airpockets in them. The clearance underneath is sufficient that you can take a 10 ft rib and drive under the bridgdeck, so it's fantastic. You'll find the fittings are excellent, italian lighting, great gear for the galleys, several steps up from most catamarans. Storage space is also fantastic designed, many catamarans have a real dearth of space. The deck is wide and flat, extremely safe, the cockpit is basically so secure that on a windy and wet day it's as dry and comfortable as the main bridgedeck settee area. For a boat with such volumous space, they took great pains to also use top quality materials to keep it light. The aluminum rub rail is on top of a wide flat deck, and protects the hulls from pilings, something frankly I don't see hardly any other boat. While the 21' beam is 1ft less than the more typical 22 ft beam found in the French boats and 2 to 3 ft less than the 23 to 24 ft beam found in some of the south african boats, the settee area comes back and is a bit deeper than the south african cats so the space seems the same when you enter, and the cockpit is so well protected again it appears as an extension of the main bridgedeck settee area. Also the extension of the cabin top further across the hulls opening up the hull space makes the cabin appear even more spacious. It has narrower hulls than most catamarans for good hydrodynamics and is a decent sailor smoking a friends 48ft bavaria when they go out together in winds more than 10 knots.
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:38   #9
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It is a slow cat , this has all to do with the weight versus sail
9 meters of sail for each 1000 kilo or a weight to sail ratio of 1:9 and that is about as minimal as one can go , off course if speed is not important this will do just fine.
Long range cruising speeds will be in the 5 to 6 knot average.
The hull width to length ratio of around 1:9 also gives it a good payload but a slow cruiser.
The ones I have seen in the past of the now defunct company where finished very nice, I have not yet seen one finished by the new company

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Old 01-08-2008, 09:56   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schoonerdog View Post
I've been on them dozens of times. I think you'll find the galley down with the settee insert down and the overhang of the cabin top is really fantastic, the cook is by no means removed from the action, and they now have 3 times the counter space of any galley up and you have far more floor space and better "living room" than any galley up could hope to provide. If you really want a galley up, go on board the Anteres, see the excellent layout of space in the settee area, and then cut it in half in your mind by having a countertop coming straight through the middle or try entertaining guests while you have two people who are prepping and cooking in the same space. Then go below and look at the huge expanse of galley, and again, cut that in half for a galley up and see how happy your wife would be. She really has to stand in the galley to appreciate how the open space above really opens up that space. The galley was designed by a gourmet chef, it's fantastic. It's funny, but every where else in life we see the reasons to have a seperate galley for space, controling the mess, so the spills on the floors aren't immediately tracked everywhere, but on catamarans people have been sold by the ex charter brokers saying how "the cook would be removed in some dark hot hole" in the hulls with galley down. Galley down came up with one reason, they needed the space in the hulls for multiple heads that they need for a charter boat. Your wife will find that she can have direct eye and voice contact with everyone up above through the settee cutout, immense room, and she can also have a private conversations with other cooks in the galley, control the mess a bit more and have the space she'll expect and need to make something fun. No one on a PDQ 42 would say it's what's commonly described as a "galley down", it's more like being in one big split level room.

Engines are amidships with straight shafts which eliminates some of the complexities of the outdrives. It also has several times the amount of space in dedicated water tight compartments than any catamaran which are known for charters, and that's really crucial. Stand in the forward starboard bow locker, look at the crash compartment under your feet and then note that your standing in one huge water tight chamber. Then step aboard any boat that serves charter service in the same area.

The keels are sacrificial with airpockets in them. The clearance underneath is sufficient that you can take a 10 ft rib and drive under the bridgdeck, so it's fantastic. You'll find the fittings are excellent, italian lighting, great gear for the galleys, several steps up from most catamarans. Storage space is also fantastic designed, many catamarans have a real dearth of space. The deck is wide and flat, extremely safe, the cockpit is basically so secure that on a windy and wet day it's as dry and comfortable as the main bridgedeck settee area. For a boat with such volumous space, they took great pains to also use top quality materials to keep it light. The aluminum rub rail is on top of a wide flat deck, and protects the hulls from pilings, something frankly I don't see hardly any other boat. While the 21' beam is 1ft less than the more typical 22 ft beam found in the French boats and 2 to 3 ft less than the 23 to 24 ft beam found in some of the south african boats, the settee area comes back and is a bit deeper than the south african cats so the space seems the same when you enter, and the cockpit is so well protected again it appears as an extension of the main bridgedeck settee area. Also the extension of the cabin top further across the hulls opening up the hull space makes the cabin appear even more spacious. It has narrower hulls than most catamarans for good hydrodynamics and is a decent sailor smoking a friends 48ft bavaria when they go out together in winds more than 10 knots.
I have ot go to a boatshow first and look with my own eyes, and after that like fastcat says, test sail the boat.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fastcat435 View Post
It is a slow cat , this has all to do with the weight versus sail
9 meters of sail for each 1000 kilo or a weight to sail ratio of 1:9 and that is about as minimal as one can go , off course if speed is not important this will do just fine.
Long range cruising speeds will be in the 5 to 6 knot average.
The hull width to length ratio of around 1:9 also gives it a good payload but a slow cruiser.
The ones I have seen in the past of the now defunct company where finished very nice, I have not yet seen one finished by the new company

Greetings

Gideon
A slow boat again... But do you think itīs safe for bluewater? Itīs very nice details on the boat, and perfect for cruising in climate like scandinavia and canada.

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Originally Posted by ldrhawke View Post
And this boat circumnavigated the world....soooo. I just feel the hull is on the narrow side for it's waterline.

Antares 44 - Owners who cruise and liveaboard their catamaran

Position Details

Is the speed on the maps average or??
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:58   #11
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I am sure it is safe , just make sure it is CE A certified by a CE notified body.
Greetings

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Old 01-08-2008, 10:01   #12
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I am sure it is safe , just make sure it is CE A certified by a CE notified body.
Greetings

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Yes, it is.
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Old 01-08-2008, 10:04   #13
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Yes, it is.
Have you seen the certification papers made out to the new company builder her ?
The certification is deleted when a new company start to build her and it need to be
re certified and so does the company.

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Old 01-08-2008, 10:08   #14
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Have you seen the certification papers made out to the new company builder her ?
The certification is deleted when a new company start to build her and it need to be
re certified and so does the company.

Greetings
No, but i will not buy a NEW boat before i have. Just from their homepage. And i like the boat but itīs not nr.1 right now. Maybe when i am 65
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Old 01-08-2008, 10:21   #15
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No, but i will not buy a NEW boat before i have. Just from their homepage. And i like the boat but itīs not nr.1 right now. Maybe when i am 65
Just for curiosity , what boat is your number one right now and for what reason ?

Gideon
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