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Old 25-06-2008, 01:46   #1
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Where to put shore power inlet?

Hi

I'm going to install shore power soon but I'm undecided where the best place is to site the shore power inlet.

I want to place it so that when we stay aboard we don't have to keep dodging it or risk breaking any connectors and also not to be in the way when sailing.

At the moment all I can think of is to have the connection made though the cockpit locker (I'm thinking of the Marinco type flush fitting connector)

I know some boats put them around their bathing platform but I don't have that - just a vertical transom with the rudder hanging off it.

Would be grateful for any advice/experiences

thanks
Frank
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Old 25-06-2008, 02:37   #2
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Simple extension lead...

I'm using a simple heavy duty extension lead through the companionway hatch.

It's easy to move round to get it out of the way as necessary. I use elastic cord with a hitch to allow for movement of the boat.

It's only a temporary setup at the moment but I will probably keep it once the boat is "complete".
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Old 25-06-2008, 03:36   #3
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I liked where mine was put on my Gulfstar.

It was on the vertical surface of the coachroof, where it meets the deck, amidships.


Amidships was perfect because no matter what direction you had to run the cable (fore, aft, off the sides), it was always the same distance - half the boat length instead of the full boat length.

If you price out shore power cables, getting away with shorter ones can save a lot!
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Old 25-06-2008, 04:01   #4
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I have one in the anchor locker on my CS36M and prefer that placement to the one on my B393 which is in the transom. When in a slip I usually go bow in and ,as most places have the power outlet on the main dock, and not the finger dock so it's a lot easier and shorter with the power inlet at the bow.
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Old 25-06-2008, 04:12   #5
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Mine is on a bulwark near the bow. When running AC wires the distance means nothing. The installation part may be more difficult since most of the time this is added while the boat is built. But there is an insignificant voltage drop on AC wires once sized for the amp load.

The Marinco connectors are designed to take all the weather you might think possible. You can connect a cable and then have a lot of rain sleet or anything else. If you dock stern in then on the stern is better since you really don't need heavy electrical cables running the length of the boat. If the outlet is always near the head of the slip you'll be able to get a shorter power chord. Most docks have power at the front of the slip. Except for a bulkhead where you never know where your boat would be.
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Old 25-06-2008, 04:33   #6
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When running AC wires the distance means nothing.


Can't say as I agree:

50'/25' 50 AMP Shore Power Cable Set Hubbell


The distance means a lot of $$
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Old 25-06-2008, 05:00   #7
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FYI, the power feed from the inlet to distribution panel should be 10 feet or less using 10 gauge marine tin coated triplex wire. Sometimes the power feed may be longer than 10 feet and will require a additional double pole breaker located at power inlet. The shorter the fun the better as we want to acheive a voltage drop under 3%. Regards, Windswept
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Old 25-06-2008, 05:33   #8
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FYI, the power feed from the inlet to distribution panel should be 10 feet or less using 10 gauge marine tin coated triplex wire. Sometimes the power feed may be longer than 10 feet and will require a additional double pole breaker located at power inlet. The shorter the fun the better as we want to acheive a voltage drop under 3%. Regards, Windswept
The Main shore power Breaker provides Overcurrent Protection, as per ABYC requirements:
11.12.2.9.3.
If the location of the main shore power disconnect circuit breaker is in excess of 10 feet (three meters) from the shore power inlet or the electrical attachment point of a permanently installed shore power cord, additional fuses or circuit breakers shall be provided within 10 feet (three meters) of the inlet or attachment point to the electrical system of the boat. Measurement is made along the conductors.
11.12.2.9.3.1.
If fuses are used in addition to the main shore power disconnect circuit breaker, their rating shall be such that the circuit breakers trip before the fuses open the circuit, in the event of overload. The ampere rating of the additional fuses or circuit breaker shall not be greater than 125% of the rating of the main shore power disconnect circuit breaker. For 120-volt service, both the grounded and ungrounded current carrying conductors shall be provided with this additional overcurrent protection.

Voltage Drop is not normally a consideration on a boat's 120VAC system.
Assuming a full capacity load of 30Amps at 120Volts, a 10 Foot (one-way) run of #10 AWG copper wire will result in a Voltage Drop of 0.7 Volts (0.6%).
It would take a 50 Ft run to generate a 3.6 Volt Drop (3%) at 30A 120V.

There’s good reasons most boatbuilders place the Shore Power Inlet in the cockpit:
- This location is generally within 10 Ft of the Main/Breaker Disconnect in the 120VAC Panel.
- This location is generally as well protected* from rain, splash & submersion, as can be found on a boat.
For these reasons, I don’t generally recommend a bow location.

* The Shore Power Inlet Location should be as protected (water & weather) as possible. Power Inlets subject to splash shall be Weather-Proof “In-Use”. These covers have a large "boot" allowing the cord to be plugged in, with the cover closed.
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Old 25-06-2008, 20:59   #9
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That doesn't look like a shore power inlet to me.
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Old 25-06-2008, 21:46   #10
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What ever works the best for your boat is the best for you. Do you dock bow first or aft in? Port or starboard to finger? Answer these questions and you will know where to put your shore power inlet.
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Old 26-06-2008, 02:17   #11
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That doesn't look like a shore power inlet to me.
It's not a shore power inlet, it's a 15A receptacle (outlet).
I couldn't find a picture of a 30A "in Use" cover.
I think the pic' illustrates the idea, tho'.
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