Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-04-2008, 09:15   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Humacao, Puerto Rico
Boat: Beneteau 456
Posts: 429
Images: 8
What type of receptacle for an Air Cond.

I would like to connect my air conditioner through an ac receptacle in my boat. Should it be a twist lock?
__________________

__________________
avazquez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 09:20   #2
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
You need to tell us a bit more about what you are considering. Are you talking about installing another shore power cord or are you just using a standard cord to plug in to an outlet? It makes a big difference.
__________________

__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 10:22   #3
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,153
I'm not sure what you are asking. Are you considering an additional power connector in order to power an onboard air conditioning unit? If you want a secure and watertight connection then absolutely, use a standard marine grade twist lock terminal.

Twistlocks are for making a secure connection that don't easily pull out. They are not all the same. They come in all sorts of different "prong" configurations which relate to amperage ratings and voltage ratings. What would be most helpful is to know the voltage, amperage and cycles per second of your air conditioning unit. As long as you have an outlet on the dock that has suitable amperage, voltage and cycles per second, then it should be no problem. You just have to get the correct connectors and the correct electrical cord to hook your air conditioning unit to the dock.

We need more detail on what you have in order to be of help.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 11:29   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Humacao, Puerto Rico
Boat: Beneteau 456
Posts: 429
Images: 8
More

Sorry for the lack of details.

This is the situation: I found out that the previous owner conected the 60 hz,120v, 16000 btu ac unit with a standard domestic type receptacle and upon inspection I discovered that the wires that go from the ac unit to the receptacle are a bit warm. I am sure he got the wire from an old domestic ac unit and used it for the boats ac. Which by the way is installed under one of the inside seating areas.

I am going to replace the receptacle and the wires but would like to keep the cabability of disconnecting the AC unit with some sort of plug. So, my question is: Which type of plug? From the meter readings I can tel the unit has a starting draw of about 20-25 amps and operates at around 11 amps continuosly.
__________________
avazquez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 11:37   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 237
I use a "Y" adapter on my shore power receptacle input and direct connect my A/C unit to the shore power cord. I've not had time to rewire all the A/C outlets and don't trust the gauge of the wiring to handle the instantaneous amperage when the unit is first started.
__________________
drh1965 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 11:44   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,153
You are going to need to wire it for the starting amperage or there will be too much of a voltage drop at startup which eventually will cause damage to the electrical motor.

Wire-Gauge Ampacity - Transwiki According to the tables, it looks like no less than 10 AWG.

Fortunately, 30 amp/120V dock outlets are pretty common.

Get a 10 AWG dock cord, a 30 amp twist lock terminal connector on your boat and a 30 amp breaker panel inside your boat. Hardwire your air conditioning unit to the breaker panel inside your boat with the correct 30 Amp dedicated breaker to your air conditioner and you wont have to hassle with a Y-connector. This would be doing it correctly and safely as well. Cosmetically, hiding all those ugly wires will make your boat look nicer.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 12:50   #7
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,596
Images: 240
Although a locking (twist-lok) connector & receptacle is always preferable to a straight blade device, it’s not at all necessary. Let your conscience and budget decide.
An 11 Amp (running) Air-Conditioner will safely operate on a 15 Amp Circuit Breaker (even /w a 25A start current), with #12 AWG wire (#14 if very short run) to a 15 Receptacle.

You could upgrade to a 20 Amp Receptacle, if you choose.
A 30Amp circuit would be ok, but overdoing it.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 13:08   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
I would agree with Gord on this one. Some like to run a second set of wiring for an AC unit. We run one 30 amp AC line in and break off the AC circuit at the panel for our 16,000 BTU unit. This means we have a breaker on the panel that goes to the control unit. Because it's AC current you should be just fine as Gord indicates. I would be sure to use stranded tinned copper wiring and not Home Depot house wire. Crimp the ends and finish with heat shrink tubing or use the heat shrink spade ends for a real pro job. Tie all the wires so they can't move.

Gord adds:
I should have said the extra things Paul just said. Gord
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 13:48   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Humacao, Puerto Rico
Boat: Beneteau 456
Posts: 429
Images: 8
Thanks....

As usual, this place and the people that contribute make this lifestyle an affordable one.

Thanks
__________________
avazquez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2008, 17:05   #10
֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,056
Gord, I'd also suggest 20-amp not 15, since a 16,000btu air conditioner is extremely high rating for a machine sold for 15-A service. Here in the US, most home fuse panels use 15A fuses (or breakers) per each circuit, and typically a 13-14,000 btu machine is the largest they'll recommend for a 15A line.

I suspect part of this is because, whether it measures 11A or not, air conditioners are typically used heaviest and longest in the hottest weather--when the capacity of wiring must be decreased for the heat, and the a/c may be running 24x7 for multiple days, really heat stressing the wires. (And, the line voltage is usually reduced in that weather, resulting in the a/c pulling higher amperage again.)

I wouldn't sleep comfortably with that machine on a 15-amp line.
__________________
hellosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 05:33   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,596
Images: 240
Although a 15 Amp circuit (Breaker/Fuse & Wiring) is rated for 12.5A continuous (80% circuit loading), I’d not object to Hellosailor’s conservative advice to provide a 20 Amp Circuit (rated 16 A continuous).
I also suspect the accuracy of an 11 Amp running current specification for a 16,000 BTUH Air-Conditioner, which I’d expect to have a Running Current more on the order of 15 Amps (which WOULD REQUIRE a 20 A cct)
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 21:21   #12
Registered User
 
Beausoleil's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Potomac Shores, VA USA
Boat: Formosa 51 Aft Cockpit Ketch - "Beausoleil"
Posts: 565
Images: 1
Not to steal the thread, but back to the original point: what type of receptacle should one use for high-powered AC devices on a boat?

I'm going to install a couple of AC-powered tankless water heaters for dock-side use, and I intend to eliminate any possibility of corrosion at the AC outlet by replacing the standard AC plug with ring terminals, and the outlet itself with a terminal strip in a protective housing (essentially a surface mount outlet box).

After feeling how hot a couple of extension cord plugs were while working on the boat (due to a bit of corrosion), I think a tight solid mechanical connection will fare much better over time than a friction-held spade connector in an outlet. I'll also do the same with the Splendide washer/dryer, and any future large-load AC appliances.
__________________
Beausoleil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 03:25   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,596
Images: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beausoleil View Post
Not to steal the thread, but back to the original point: what type of receptacle should one use for high-powered AC devices on a boat?
I'm going to install a couple of AC-powered tankless water heaters for dock-side use, and I intend to eliminate any possibility of corrosion at the AC outlet by replacing the standard AC plug with ring terminals, and the outlet itself with a terminal strip in a protective housing (essentially a surface mount outlet box).
After feeling how hot a couple of extension cord plugs were while working on the boat (due to a bit of corrosion), I think a tight solid mechanical connection will fare much better over time than a friction-held spade connector in an outlet. I'll also do the same with the Splendide washer/dryer, and any future large-load AC appliances.
Appliances that come with a cord & cap set, for plug-in use, can be hard wired as you describe; but they should have a safety disconnect switch.
As supplied, the appliance can be quickly disconnected (without the use of tools) by removing the cap from the receptacle.

You could substitute a “Horsepower Rated” 2-pole switch, in lieu of the proposed terminal block.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 11:05   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Humacao, Puerto Rico
Boat: Beneteau 456
Posts: 429
Images: 8
Back to the original question.....

Is there a recomended particular plug connection for things like air conditioners, water heaters etc. other than the regular domestic receptacle? Twist on?
__________________
avazquez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 11:53   #15
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
You can use a conventional 20 amp outlet if it is a plug in style unit, but if it is an installed item then hard wired is the preferred. Both ways would use a breaker. Not having a breaker would be very poor. AC units and hot water heaters would have their own circuit and own switch with a breaker.

This really is not unlike it would be at home. Large AC current devices usually have a dedicated circuit since they can draw more than a normal wall outlet on a 15 amp circuit with other outlets. Using conventional grounded wall outlets on board for small appliances is customary. Sometimes just a port and starboard set of outlets is sufficient.
__________________

__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Air-X Land vs AIR-X Marine Wind Generator tomj Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 42 25-06-2011 18:08
Type 1 diabetics mudnut Health, Safety & Related Gear 13 28-05-2008 03:59
Spinnaker for 40' Boat, Exc Cond. Greg S Classifieds Archive 0 13-09-2007 12:50
Air to Air Single split AC Octopus Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 4 15-07-2007 08:19



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:04.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.