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Old 17-02-2016, 13:15   #16
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

Great information fellas.
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Old 17-02-2016, 13:43   #17
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by Looking4Neptune View Post
Would you use the same compounds for connectors on phones and tablets?

And what do you recommend to clean after corrosion? I have an earphone jack on one phone and the charging/usb connector on another that have corroded.

thanks
Pat
Definately no. Any paste like protector will coat a port and accumulate dirt debris and salt if its something you are plugging in and out frequantly. Scotch brite is a good solution to clean corrosion. A green pad like for doing dishes. It will leave some particulate but its plastic and it woun't damage the plug. If you have access, maroon (220 equivalant) or white/grey fine.
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Old 17-02-2016, 14:02   #18
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by Looking4Neptune View Post
Would you use the same compounds for connectors on phones and tablets?

And what do you recommend to clean after corrosion? I have an earphone jack on one phone and the charging/usb connector on another that have corroded.

thanks
Pat
My goto product for very small low current connectors is Deoxit Preservit
See DeoxIT® Shield S-Series

Note, this is not a contact cleaner, only a sealer / preserver and should only be applied after cleaning.

FWIW, Deoxit D5 is simply one of the very best contact cleaners - IMO. I'm sure it has some equals but I have yet to see / use anything better and I have used many contact cleaners over the years.

Unlike many electrical contact cleaners, you only need a very light spray, then exercise the connector, another very light spray and unless there is severe corrosion, you are good to go.

Severe corrosion requires some further mechanical cleaning after a light spray.

But for the OP, DC4 is wonderful for medium / heavy duty connections and really is had to beat.
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Old 17-02-2016, 20:03   #19
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

I like "Houdini" as an electrical contact cleaner.
An automobile lock smith turned me onto it. For spraying in the hole your car keys go into when contacts aren't working right when my truck wouldn't start a few years ago.
Use it on the boat now.
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Old 17-02-2016, 20:33   #20
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
Try silicon grease like Dow Corning No.4.
Although listed as a dielectric grease (ie insulating), it is a very low pressure grease which means in effect, that it will squeeze out between the contacts allowing for a true metal to metal contact.

I use it on all connectors / contacts on board as well as previously at work on flying boats and seaplanes.

There are better / more exotic contact preservers but DC 4 is a good all round waterproof contact sealers.
+1 for dielectric grease. Dont use normal grease or vaseline on electrical connectors. If your connection experiences a high current draw for any reason the grease will smolder and oxidize.

I'll use dielectric grease on the metal to metal connection.

Ill use liquid electrical sealer on the connected joint under the heat shrink. Ancor or similar heatshrink over the top. I might even double heat shrink if the joint has a severe change of section.

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Old 17-02-2016, 20:47   #21
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by muttskie View Post
Another vote for Dow Corning No.4. It is much used in aviation for this sort of thing, as well.

http://www.amazon.com/Dow-Corning-El...=dow+corning+4
thanx for heads up... ebay a bit cheaper on it.
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Old 17-02-2016, 23:01   #22
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

Do you have a rule of thumb for what size heat shrink you use to put over the whole (already heat shrunk) connector? One size oversize (I.e. if it's a 16ga connector use 14ga heat shrink) work? Two sizes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Alchemy View Post
In wire connections, I use heat shrinking crimp connectors by Ancor: make a proper crimp, then apply heat and the ends of the connector shrink. Then I get the glue-lined heat shrink tubing (which you have to put on before the crimp, clearly), position the tubing, the length of which should overlap both ends of the cooled-down crimp connector, and use a heat gun (carefully) to shrink it on.

That could get submerged without failing, although I wouldn't test it destructively!

Loads of pictures of these techniques here: http://alchemy2009.blogspot.ca/2014/...terminals.html


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Old 18-02-2016, 00:51   #23
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by leftbrainstuff View Post
+1 for dielectric grease. Dont use normal grease or vaseline on electrical connectors. If your connection experiences a high current draw for any reason the grease will smolder and oxidize.

I'll use dielectric grease on the metal to metal connection.

Ill use liquid electrical sealer on the connected joint under the heat shrink. Ancor or similar heatshrink over the top. I might even double heat shrink if the joint has a severe change of section.

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I could be wrong, but I would suggest if that becomes an issue then your electrical circuit has far bigger problems.

Me, I prefer the idea of always using something that has multiple uses on a boat. Therefore I use lanolin grease. With a 70 Kilovolt dielectric strength, it can even be coated on spark plugs and leads. It can also protect metal surfaces, be used as a poor man's propspeed, used as an anti-seize compound, and can even be used wherever a low melting point grease is required. Best of all, it's a 100% natural and renewable product. What's not to like?


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Old 18-02-2016, 01:01   #24
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

so the current tally is


Votes for sheep in a bottle
1 kiwi
1 aussie


hmmmmm....
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Old 18-02-2016, 01:02   #25
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

It's cos we smart

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Old 18-02-2016, 04:02   #26
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by Reefmagnet View Post
I could be wrong, but I would suggest if that becomes an issue then your electrical circuit has far bigger problems.

Me, I prefer the idea of always using something that has multiple uses on a boat. Therefore I use lanolin grease. With a 70 Kilovolt dielectric strength, it can even be coated on spark plugs and leads. It can also protect metal surfaces, be used as a poor man's propspeed, used as an anti-seize compound, and can even be used wherever a low melting point grease is required. Best of all, it's a 100% natural and renewable product. What's not to like?


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I love lanolin grease and use it in many applications but I am unsure about it on electrical contacts. For my untrained mind, I want a dielctric grease that flows away under very low pressures which ensures a low resistance connection. I know that DC4 is such a grease but is lanolin - maybe it is but I am not the one who is willing to experiment with it.

lanolin seems to me to be a medium pressure grease but perhaps I'm wrong ???
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Old 18-02-2016, 04:52   #27
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

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Originally Posted by basssears View Post
Do you have a rule of thumb for what size heat shrink you use to put over the whole (already heat shrunk) connector? One size oversize (I.e. if it's a 16ga connector use 14ga heat shrink) work? Two sizes?
Choose heat shrink tubing that is at least twenty to thirty percent larger* than your largest wire, making sure that the tubing has a high enough shrink ratio* to get a snug fit on the smallest part you wish to cover.
* Generally, the largest diameter tubing that will shrink to a tight fit, provides the most stress relief, and the longest service life.
* Heat shrink comes in 2:1, 3:1, & 4:1 shrink ratios, meaning 2:1 will shrink to ˝ its original diameter, and 3:1 to 1/3, etc.

I generally applied an appropriately coloured, thick wall, 3:1 ratio, adhesive lined shrink, then a label (/w numbers & description), then overcovered all with a clear, thin walled, 2:1 shrink, to hold the label & provide additional mechanical protection.
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Old 18-02-2016, 05:38   #28
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

Thank you for this massive feedback, I learned a lot and will go a-shopping for a few of these products.

Slightly off-topic to my original post:

Forget electric for a while but keep the anti-corrosion spirit. Parts that become hot (like engine and such) - which oils, gels, grease, spray ... can be used and won't be burned off, next time you run your engine full ahead?

That is, something to apply to general surfaces that would otherwise be subject to corrosion.

Now that I go grease shopping anyway, I want to hear your thoughts on this as well.

Thanks, forum
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Old 18-02-2016, 06:12   #29
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
I love lanolin grease and use it in many applications but I am unsure about it on electrical contacts. For my untrained mind, I want a dielctric grease that flows away under very low pressures which ensures a low resistance connection. I know that DC4 is such a grease but is lanolin - maybe it is but I am not the one who is willing to experiment with it.

lanolin seems to me to be a medium pressure grease but perhaps I'm wrong ???
I wouldn't apply it to relay or switch contacts, but it works fine on connectors. Never had a problem, including under body connectors on 4wd vehicles that get submerged in sea water.

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Old 18-02-2016, 06:14   #30
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Re: Protecting connections and plugs against corrosion

Boeshields T9 (developed by Boeing) ... I spray everything metal and electrical .... fuel tanks, engine, shaft, stuffing box, inside of my laptop even open the radar and spray circuit boards, all my tools, absolutely everything.,, never seen any corrosion.
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