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Old 05-08-2013, 00:02   #1
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Next Generation Power Engineering

I'm looking around at small diesel generators for my Fraser 41. Around the net, I have read quite a few negative things about the Fischer Panda gensets, but I recently stumbled upon a company in Florida called Next Generation Power Engineering. They make a 3.5kw and a 5.5kw compact marine generator from a Kubota diesel engine.

Here is the link:

NEXT-GEN - Marine Power Units

Does anyone have any experience with these gensets? They turn at 2800 rpm, which seems a little fast to me.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:17   #2
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Re: Next Generation Power Engineering

I have the 3.5 KW NextGen unit with sound shield. It works well if you stay within its power limitations. It will start and run a 12,000 BTU A/C (and probably a 16,000 as well) and one other appliance such as a microwave, water heater, etc of about 12 amps load. But not two appliances and the A/C.

The single cylinder Kubota engine does run at 2,800 rpm but that is a good compromise of power vs weight. It is reasonably quiet inside the boat but there is an annoying putt-putt exhaust sound that will probably bother anyone anchored within 100' behind.

The 5.5 KW unit with two cylinders will probably be quieter and of course will run more stuff. It is only slightly bigger than the 3.5 KW.

These gensets are light for their KW output and are fine for limited duty. If I were going to live aboard and use one extensively I would go for a heavier 1,800 rpm unit like the Northern Lights.

You are wise to stay away from the Fischer Panda. It is a beautiful piece of German over engineering that has no place on a boat.

David
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:21   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirruscloud View Post

Does anyone have any experience with these gensets? They turn at 2800 rpm, which seems a little fast to me.
That's slow compared to a Panda!!

I've only been around two or three if them, but that all seems to purr along.

The bigger question is what do you wan to run with it?
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:31   #4
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Re: Next Generation Power Engineering

We have the NextGen 5.5kw unit. It is smooth and works well. The generator head they use is a bit light-duty and many fail after 5-7yrs. Good thing is that replacement heads only cost $700, which is still a lot of money, but only a fraction of the cost of most.

Generators for 60Hz either run at 3600rpm or 1800rpm. The tradeoff is weight, with 1800rpm units being significantly heavier than 3600rpm. The Nextgen can run between that at 2850rpm because it uses a belt to drive the generator head, so can use pulley ratios to run the head at 3600 while the engine is at 2850.

Like has already been mentioned, these are great light duty generators, but if you are looking for continuous operation of high loads, then a 1800rpm unit like Northern Lights would be a better choice.

All single cylinder engines putt-putt.

Mark
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:13   #5
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Re: Next Generation Power Engineering

I have had the 3.5kw Next Generation for about 12 years. I have been very pleased with it. The factory service is excellent.
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Old 05-08-2013, 13:14   #6
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Re: Next Generation Power Engineering

We installed the 3.5 and are very happy with the unit. It has been under almost constant use for over 8 months and performs flawlessly. here is our installation, The Trawler Beach House: Do-It-Yourself Generator Install . Chuck
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Old 05-08-2013, 13:41   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj
We have the NextGen 5.5kw unit. It is smooth and works well. The generator head they use is a bit light-duty and many fail after 5-7yrs. Good thing is that replacement heads only cost $700, which is still a lot of money, but only a fraction of the cost of most.

Generators for 60Hz either run at 3600rpm or 1800rpm. The tradeoff is weight, with 1800rpm units being significantly heavier than 3600rpm. The Nextgen can run between that at 2850rpm because it uses a belt to drive the generator head, so can use pulley ratios to run the head at 3600 while the engine is at 2850.

Like has already been mentioned, these are great light duty generators, but if you are looking for continuous operation of high loads, then a 1800rpm unit like Northern Lights would be a better choice.

All single cylinder engines putt-putt.

Mark
+1

The NextGen gensets are admirably simple and straightforward devices, so different from the awful FP units, but I don't, personally, like that one-lunger Kubota rototiller motor, which is a cheap, light duty motor not designed for any kind of sustained load. The two cylinder model will be much quieter and more durable. But even that is not vaguely comparable to a proper heavy duty, low speed, 3 cylinder, continuous-duty rated unit like the Northern Lights, if you can afford the cost and weight.
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