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Old 20-08-2010, 19:42   #61
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The picture was from an A380 test plane. Wiring delayed the program a year and a half.

From wikipedia
""Initial production of the A380 was troubled by delays attributed to the 530 km (330 mi) of wiring in each aircraft. Airbus cited as underlying causes the complexity of the cabin wiring (100,000 wires and 40,300 connectors), its concurrent design and production, the high degree of customisation for each airline, and failures of configuration management and change control.[49][50] Specifically, it would appear that German and Spanish Airbus facilities continued to use CATIA version 4, while British and French sites migrated to version 5.[51] This caused overall configuration management problems, at least in part because wiring harnesses manufactured using aluminium rather than copper conductors necessitated special design rules including non-standard dimensions and bend radii; these were not easily transferred between versions of the software.""

Concurrent design and production means they planned on finishing the wiring designs for different customers after the planes had started being built. The switch to 'tinned'(actualy nickel coated) copper clad aluminum wires came late in the progam to save 20% of the wiring weight.
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Old 20-08-2010, 19:58   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmason View Post
Looks like the U.S. Navy likes heat shrink on connections too.

I was just out working (weatherizing antenna connections) on a DDG here at Yokosuka, Japan.
You were on Dried Distillers Grain


Edit: Keep it safe don't take the wheel lol.
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Old 17-05-2012, 13:56   #63
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Re: Heatshrink Connectors AND Tinned Wire ?

I just scanned all this thread, and noticed it does not comment on something I've added to my connector protocol. I've started using dielectric grease in many applications. My thinking is that some electrical issues begin to occur as connections suffer from a buildup of corrosion byproducts. The byproducts insulate the connection, and the connection heats up and a spiralling effect occurs until failure.

Sooo..., I put dielectric grease on a wire before I use a "proper" crimper over the connector, on the connector and connector post and nut before tightening, on any push-on connector I might be forced to use, and even on bulbs and fuses before installing them. I put a thin coat over battery posts and the connectors, and even on flashlight battery ends.

If dielectric grease helps avoid even one trip up the mast, it is worth the cost of the tube and the time. The tube, as it is, will last a boatowner a lifetime, as it needs only to go on thinly.

Any comments?
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Old 17-05-2012, 15:03   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonosailor
I just scanned all this thread, and noticed it does not comment on something I've added to my connector protocol. I've started using dielectric grease in many applications. My thinking is that some electrical issues begin to occur as connections suffer from a buildup of corrosion byproducts. The byproducts insulate the connection, and the connection heats up and a spiralling effect occurs until failure.

Sooo..., I put dielectric grease on a wire before I use a "proper" crimper over the connector, on the connector and connector post and nut before tightening, on any push-on connector I might be forced to use, and even on bulbs and fuses before installing them. I put a thin coat over battery posts and the connectors, and even on flashlight battery ends.

If dielectric grease helps avoid even one trip up the mast, it is worth the cost of the tube and the time. The tube, as it is, will last a boatowner a lifetime, as it needs only to go on thinly.

Any comments?
I'm not sure what your using but normally dielectric grease is an insulator it's used on the outside of to lubricate gaskets in plugs etc. perhaps you mean electrically conductive grease that's usually carbon or silver loaded

Dave
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Old 17-05-2012, 16:22   #65
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Re: Heatshrink Connectors AND Tinned Wire ?

The word "dielectric grease" is in fact a NON conductive, insulating grease, used only to seal out moisture. It is better on the outside of a connection, rather than IN it... although with enough pressure, you still get a connection. I also use an electrically "conductive" grease, called JetLube. It has copper powder in it, accentuates the connection, and seals out moisture too.

On my own boats, and in my work, I have seen thousands of crimps over the years, many are decades old. "For those willing to go to the trouble", as I do on my own boat, here is the best, "lifetime of the boat" connection procedure.

Use NEW or otherwise shiny, finely stranded, tinned wire. To crimp on an eye, you first remove the sleeve, and toss it. Then you put 2" of adhesive lined heatshrink on the wire. Slide it out of the way.

Now do a firm crimp, in 2 or 3 places, depending on size. This is your permanent physical connection.

Next do a SMALL solder on the outer (eye end) of the eye's sleeve. With a mini tourch, and super fine solder, this single drop is easy. YOU DO NOT WANT TO FILL THE ENTIRE SLEEVE AND GO DOWN THE WIRE! Otherwise you get a hard spot, down the wire. This procedure, correctly done, creates a permanent "welded" electrical connection, AND the open end of the eye's sleeve, is now sealed as well.

This is followed by putting in position and shrinking down the heat shrink, until it oozes well..

This connection can now be relied on for over 40 years. (Of coarse, every wire on the boat should run through conduit, or be fastened every 8" or so. This way it NEVER flexes).

The common practice of crimping only, and using eyes with open sleeves on their "eye end", results in good performance for 10 or 15 years only. After this, the wire has wicked moisture up inside, through these openings, and starts to turn black with corrosion IN the crimp's interior interface. This causes resistance and lessens the connection a bit. With a thousand of these on a boat, it starts to add up to a far from efficient electrical system. = use & charging losses... 95% of marine electricians do this "crimp only" ANYWAY, because its the only way to make a living. (Unless you work for time & materials, like I do). This has a financial down side too! Not as much work.

With crimp only / open sleeve, At 20 years old, you start getting outright failures, and at 30, the entire boat needs an entirely new wiring harness, as the old one is shot!

What I suggest avoids this entirely. I have cut open my connections after decades, and they're still shiny inside!

For important big connections, like the windlass, refrigerator, or particularly the battery...
I crimp the large eye, then solder, then heatshrink. It is sealed and a 100% connection to the eye. Then to bolt it to the battery, I put the previously mentioned JetLube in the interface, and bolt it tightly. Next I wipe off ALL of the JetLube that is outside of the interface, with mineral spirits. Finally I coat with 5 coats of Liquid Lectric Tape. (Vinyl dip) I coat this cleaned up connection, from 1" up the wire, to 1" onto the battery top.

This way, I have a perfect, 100% connection, with "0" maintenance, until I change out the L-14 Trojan batteries 12 or 14 years later. After opening up the connections, they're still shiny inside!

These ideas are strictly for folks that plan on keeping the boat, and will go the extra mile for a "good trip" further down the road. For many, its just too much hassle.

What you don't want, is to have to re-wire an entire boat. It is more work that you would imagine!

M.
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Old 17-05-2012, 18:42   #66
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Re: Heatshrink Connectors AND Tinned Wire ?

Quote:
With crimp only / open sleeve, At 20 years old, you start getting outright failures, and at 30, the entire boat needs an entirely new wiring harness, as the old one is shot!
OMG, on my 28 heart old boat I better start pulling it all out what with the outright failures and impending doom. No wait I've inspected mine, and I have ZERO failures. Hmmmmmm.


What you advocate is fine and dandy but for conclusions are not borne out in reality. In fact its bad engineering. Engineering is a compromise between time, effectiveness and money. No point designing a single component ( the wiring system) to last 50 years when mostly everything else will have failed or be replaced.
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Old 17-05-2012, 19:19   #67
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Oh Boy Fun with Crimp connectors



This photo is from a rewire of a 1996 Tolley Craft 48 footer, arguably one of the best built boats on the West Coast. This connector was for the Port Alternator. It was in one of the driest warmest engine rooms on a boat that I have re-wired. The boat is moored in fresh water 10 months out of the year.

The other 2 months' she's away from her mornings cruising Southern BC waters...the salt-chuck.

The Owner assured me that no I didn't need to re-wire the alternators BC everything was working fine. They were 65 amp delco's feeding the House/Start banks through a diode isolator. I came aboard to re-place both house and start batteries.



WHAT'S Wrong with this picture?

Lloyd
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Old 17-05-2012, 19:34   #68
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Re: Heatshrink Connectors AND Tinned Wire ?

Quote:
WHAT'S Wrong with this picture?
its way too big too be downloaded quickly

Dave
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