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Old 25-12-2009, 22:19   #1
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Golf Cart Batteries vs Marine Batteries

I need help in buying batteries for my house bank. The battery I was looking at is a Trojan 12V 150Ah Flooded Lead Acid Golf Cart Battery. I will buy 4ea for my bank.

When I called the store Batteries in a flash, the store owner stated that the batteries I am trying to buy are for golf carts not sail boats. He said that I need this other battery designed for marine industry. This battery is also a deep cycle but less Ah about 115 Ah.

My question is it any difference between the batteries as for as usage? I have herd of other people using golf cart batteries on there boat and working just fine. Or do I have to buy a marine deep cycle battery? Thanks
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Old 25-12-2009, 22:56   #2
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The battery does not know

Quote:
the store owner stated that the batteries I am trying to buy are for golf carts not sail boats. He said that I need this other battery designed for marine industry.
There is no real difference between marine batteries and batteries of similar construction for other application. The Trojan T-105's (6v) have been standard for cruising boats for many moons. The battery does not know what it is going in. I am sure the store owner has a reason he holds the opinion he does, and I would want to hear it to see if he can make his case.. but I doubt it.

There are MANY many many boats with golf cart batteries.
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Old 26-12-2009, 03:23   #3
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If you look at Trojans web site, the 105 is listed under marine and commerical, they are one and the same battery.
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Old 26-12-2009, 03:54   #4
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May I suggest that you install two 6v. batteries in place of each 12v. battery. If for example you chose the Trojan 1275 12v. Deep Cycle battery with 150 ah rating you will be getting almost 40% less capacity than if you chose to install two (2) Trojan 125 6v. deep cycle batteries in series, with an amp hour rating of 240 ah. You would need fewer batteries to comlete the amp rating desired.
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Old 26-12-2009, 04:58   #5
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Bill, I think it would be helpful for you to take a look at:
http://www.trojanbattery.com/pdf/Marine_SS.pdf

As Jim suggests, considering batteries in a 6V form factor can often (but not always) maximize the amp hours that one can squeeze into a boat's existing battery boxes. (One of the benefits of the table in the link is that it helps you to look at the height of the batteries, not just L X W. When I last swapped out 7 yr old T105's for a fresh set, I was able to move up to T145's simply because I could accept the taller battery case even if I had to live with the T105's footprint). Working off this table while a tape measure is in your hand might give you some choices you wouldn't otherwise have considered. Of course, there are many other battery brands that warrant consideration...but Trojans do seem to enjoy a widely positive rep among cruising folks.

Another advantage of 6V batteries is that you may well be able to muscle each battery out of the store and into the boat by yourself. Most of the larger capacity 12V form factors are awfully heavy.

Your local store vendor may be well intentioned but I'm afraid his advice is quite incomplete.

Jack
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Old 26-12-2009, 05:23   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jentine View Post
May I suggest that you install two 6v. batteries in place of each 12v. battery. If for example you chose the Trojan 1275 12v. Deep Cycle battery with 150 ah rating you will be getting almost 40% less capacity than if you chose to install two (2) Trojan 125 6v. deep cycle batteries in series, with an amp hour rating of 240 ah. You would need fewer batteries to comlete the amp rating desired.
This is what I neede to know before going out and buying a complete battery bank. Hm I guess I need to back to the drawing board again and see how many 6V Trojan 125 I need to make up my Ah NEED AT 50% capisity. It sounds like I might need a lot of batteries. I will try to figure out how many I need and get back with you. Thanks
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Old 26-12-2009, 05:26   #7
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Originally Posted by Euro Cruiser View Post
Bill, I think it would be helpful for you to take a look at:
http://www.trojanbattery.com/pdf/Marine_SS.pdf

As Jim suggests, considering batteries in a 6V form factor can often (but not always) maximize the amp hours that one can squeeze into a boat's existing battery boxes. (One of the benefits of the table in the link is that it helps you to look at the height of the batteries, not just L X W. When I last swapped out 7 yr old T105's for a fresh set, I was able to move up to T145's simply because I could accept the taller battery case even if I had to live with the T105's footprint). Working off this table while a tape measure is in your hand might give you some choices you wouldn't otherwise have considered. Of course, there are many other battery brands that warrant consideration...but Trojans do seem to enjoy a widely positive rep among cruising folks.

Another advantage of 6V batteries is that you may well be able to muscle each battery out of the store and into the boat by yourself. Most of the larger capacity 12V form factors are awfully heavy.

Your local store vendor may be well intentioned but I'm afraid his advice is quite incomplete.

Jack
Euro that Web site is were I am going to figure out How many batteries I may need. Thanks for the info.
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Old 26-12-2009, 06:15   #8
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Bill Estes,

Trojan T105 (6v) golf cart batteries are great batteries for the boat. I'm on my 3rd set of 8 batteries (first 2 sets lasted about 8 years each).

Be aware that Trojan makes the T105 batteries with a varity of terminals ...... Make sure you order the battery with the specific terminals that you need! Also, shop around, there is usually a world of difference in prices from one shop to another. I purchased my last set back in May (I think) and they were $82.00 each + a $20.00 core charge (returnable with your old batteries).

good luck, Bill A ......... S/ Mobetah
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Old 26-12-2009, 06:38   #9
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and they were $82.00 each + a $20.00 core charge (returnable with your old batteries)
Sometimes I could just cry $275 this side of the pond. Unfortunatey they won't easily fit either, battery box too shallow.

T105 - Trojan Deep Cycle Battery

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Old 26-12-2009, 06:46   #10
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Originally Posted by Jentine View Post
May I suggest that you install two 6v. batteries in place of each 12v. battery. If for example you chose the Trojan 1275 12v. Deep Cycle battery with 150 ah rating you will be getting almost 40% less capacity than if you chose to install two (2) Trojan 125 6v. deep cycle batteries in series, with an amp hour rating of 240 ah. You would need fewer batteries to comlete the amp rating desired.
I believe the appropriate amp hour comparison would be 225 for the pair of T105's vs. 150 for the T1275. And it's also important to look at weight and dimensions in comparing them. A bank of T1275's might actually be preferable when looking at all the variables. Plus, for a 12v system, it would probably be easier to match up amp hour needs with the T1275, just because of the smaller amp hours per battery vs. each pair of T105's. For example, if one needs about 300 amp hours in a battery bank, you could get exactly that with 2 T1275's but you'd have to go with 4 T105's, spend more money, take up more space and add more weight.
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Old 26-12-2009, 07:09   #11
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Battery (DC) primer

I know some of you already know this, this is to help the OP and other new folks in the future....

Trojan's are the "Cadillac" of batteries. You could chose a less expensive brand of golf-cart battery and still come out ahead when compared to an ordinary Marine battery.

Bill, all that salesman knows is the training he received for "application". Trojan also makes batteries for floor buffers, that doesn't mean that it's improper to use them in another application.

Here's the deal:

Voltage= "pressure" or "potential"
Amperage= "flow" or "capacity", or you can think of it as a tank of stored energy like a fuel tank. The more amps you have, the bigger your "tank". Also, when measuring amps in an active electrical circuit, you're measuring the "flow" of "electrical water" (electrons) as they pass from the negative battery plate, through the "load" (lights, electronics, etc) and to the postive battery plate. When you charge the battery, you push the electrons back to the negative battery plate.

6v and 8v golf cart batteries have the same amount of lead and active material on the cell plates as a similar size/weight 12v battery. The difference is, the plates are thicker and fewer, so although the voltage is less, the capacity is greater because the single plates have more surface area. By connecting (identical) batteries in "series" (+ to -), you double the voltage, while your capacity remains as if you only had one of those batteries. If you connect them in "parallel" (+ to + and - to -) then you double the capacity but the voltage remains as if you only had one of those batteries.

You need 12 or 13v of "pressure" on your electrical circuits for your lights and gear to function correctly. You're seeking to buy the biggest capacity or "energy tank" you can afford, and that will fit in your boat.

So you have a choice:

a) You can wire two 12v Marine batteries in parallel for 12v @ double the capacity of one of those Marine batteries.

b) You can wire two 6v golf cart batteries in series for 12v @ the capacity of ONE golf cart battery (which is certainly more than a single Marine battery, but might not be more than 2 of them in parallel)

Simply look at the amp capacity of the batteries you're considering, do the math, compare the prices and see which configuration will give you the capacity you desire for the best price.

Whatever you do, make sure that you buy 2 new, identical batteries, manufactured roughly at the same time. Otherwise you'll find yourself with batteries that are out of balance, one will discharge into the other, and they'll kind of kill each other in a short time.

I converted a 1974 VW Bug to 100% battery-electric drive. It had a range of 40 miles and a max speed of 70 mph and I put 10,000 miles on it before I sold it. I had SIXTEEN 8v golf cart batteries to balance, for 128volts, nominal. Wiring up 2 batteries is cake.

Hope this helps!
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Old 26-12-2009, 08:28   #12
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So you have a choice:

a) You can wire two 12v Marine batteries in parallel for 12v @ double the capacity of one of those Marine batteries.

b) You can wire two 6v golf cart batteries in series for 12v @ the capacity of ONE golf cart battery (which is certainly more than a single Marine battery, but might not be more than 2 of them in parallel)
So Bubble:

I've been leaning at going the 6v route, but what you're saying is that you actually get more Ah's with comparable 12v batt's? For instance, two 12v 115 Ah batt's give you 230 Ah's where two 150 ah 6v batt's give you 115 ah? It seems in this case the best spark for your dollar would be 12v. Please enlighten me as to why so many are going to 6v. thanks.
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Old 26-12-2009, 09:19   #13
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There really is no such thing as a marine battery. Unless of course someone is making one with a white case, gold plated terminals and charging twice as much as what everyone else is charging.
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Old 26-12-2009, 11:55   #14
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Galynd,
My boat came with a house bank of 2 - 140 Ah 12V batteries, giving me a 280 AH bank. I later switched to 4 - 6V 240 AH batteries, now giving me a 480 Ah bank (12 V). The 4 Trojan golf carts took up the same space (footprint) as the 2 - 12 V batteries, effectively giving me an increase of 200 Ah for the same space. Be aware however, that the Trojan's are a bit taller than the batteries I replaced, but I had adequate height available.
This change has increased my usable Ah by almost 72%, very worthwhile IMHO.
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Old 26-12-2009, 17:09   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galynd View Post
So Bubble:

I've been leaning at going the 6v route, but what you're saying is that you actually get more Ah's with comparable 12v batt's? For instance, two 12v 115 Ah batt's give you 230 Ah's where two 150 ah 6v batt's give you 115 ah? It seems in this case the best spark for your dollar would be 12v. Please enlighten me as to why so many are going to 6v. thanks.
Yes, the two 12v in parallel will give you 230 Ah. The two 6v batteries in series will give you 150ah, but at 12 volts. But that's comparing batteries that you have selected.

You can find 6v batteries that have more capacity than 150 ah. As Firehoser says- he wired in 6v batteries, that were 240ah each! That's a lot more capacity than the 150ah 6 volt battery that you're looking at. You won't find a 12v battery that has 240ah capacity in the size you're looking for. That's why folks are using the golf cart batteries.

Firehoser's total capacity of 480ah is pretty impressive. You might check his configuration to see if it would fit your boat.

You know, it isn't just about how much energy you can carry on your boat. It's also about using it wisely so you don't have to turn your boat into a "lead sled".

LED lighting, wind turbines or solar panels and gas or oil lanterns for light and heat can stretch your amp-hours and reduce the need for a huge battery bank.
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