Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 13-07-2018, 07:35   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: New Jersey
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40.3
Posts: 19
Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

Is it OK to have a 12v electrical connection outside the boat and exposed to weather if it is protected by heat shrink tubing?

My Jeanneau SO 40.3 has the red and green nav lights mounted to brackets attached to the pulpit. The nav lights are separate lights not combined into one unit. I need to replace them for a few reasons and want to upgrade to Hella NaviLED PRO navigation lamps. These have a long (2.5 m?) cable that comes out the back to connect to the boat’s wiring - very similar to what I have there now. The cable on each of the existing lights is routed along and zip tied to the horizontal pulpit railing and then enters the vertical portion of the pulpit through a grommet.

The problem is, there does not appear to be any slack where I can pull the existing cable out, connect the new lights and then tuck the new connection back into the pulpit rail. Will the electric connection be sufficiently protected if I cut the existing cable, connect the individual wires in the two cables with heat shrink butt connectors and then cover the whole connection including both butt connectors with heat shrink? I would zip tie that to the rail like the original but it would be exposed to weather and not buried in the rail. The option is to trace and replace the wiring back into the interior of the boat, which is not a terrible idea but will take more time now than I have available right now.

Thanks.
__________________

Tom_F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2018, 07:56   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 21,015
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

Yes but use the good butt connectors with the built in shrink tubing that not only shrinks but oozes goop into the seal. They are a bit expensive, maybe $.80 each? but worth it for that application or underfloor damp bilge pump wires etc.
__________________

__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2018, 07:56   #3
Moderator
 
Paul Elliott's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,531
Images: 4
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

I would use the adhesive-filled connectors and heatsink. I have that arrangement on my bow bi-color light and it has held up for years.
__________________
Paul Elliott, S/V VALIS - Pacific Seacraft 44 #16 - Friday Harbor, WA
www.sailvalis.com
Paul Elliott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2018, 08:19   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: New Jersey
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40.3
Posts: 19
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

Thanks. I only use 3M adhesive-lined connectors and adhesive-lined heat shrink so I have that covered, but thanks for the reminder.
Tom_F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2018, 09:49   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2012
Boat: Jeanneau SO45.2
Posts: 162
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

I did the same upgrade to the Hella NaviLED PRO on my SO 45.2 (largely because the original fixtures' $15 long-filament bulbs kept dieing from vibration rather than actual use). They did have just enough cable to reach down the pulpit, back through the anchor well and barely past the cable glands into the sail locker. Use the old cable to pull a fish wire which then pulled the new ones through. Without a sail locker, you should have more than enough cable to reach a splice/junction well inside the boat.


If you coil up and zip-tie the excess on the new lights, you can do the splice/heatshrink/ziptie method now, then fish the new cables down into the boat later when you have time and a hankering to do a "boat project".



Do check the lights work before shrinking everything - they are polarity sensitive which I discovered after making one of my splices. And depending when/where your Jeanneau was built, "blue" is "ground/negative" and "brown" ("marron") is "hot/positive".
Redline452 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2018, 16:46   #6
Registered User

Join Date: May 2016
Location: mackay, queensland. australia
Boat: e.a jack (builder), g.l watson (designer), 6.2 mtr wll sailboat
Posts: 527
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

hopefully they are made with tinned wire and your boat has tinned wiring / slide on your self sealing shrink tape sleeves, solder your wires to make the join, when the solder cools slide your shrink tape over the join and heat to shrink and seal your soldering handywork, protecting with uv stable pvc electrical tape that matches the colour of the frame the wire runs along looks tidier / if your join is likely to be stressed( brushed past or ropes accidently pulled across it) uv stable wire ties(matching colour of course) should last as long as the nav lights. we have a waterproof submergible nav light on the port side showing a rusty water mark on the inside of the lens so sometime in the near future we will be practicing the joining technique ourselves. if you write the day of joining in your ships log be interesting to see how many sea miles your wiring repair lasts for
knockabout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2018, 21:07   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: New Zealand
Boat: 50’ Bavaria
Posts: 527
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

I did a splice like this for an underwater pond fountain pump. Cut back to clean wire, twisted and soldered together, then covered each connection with heat shrink. I then slid another cover of the glue-type heatshrink over the whole lot and secured it. Lasted completely underwater far longer than the pump.
Tillsbury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2018, 00:56   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Australia
Boat: Island Packet 40
Posts: 2,265
Images: 7
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

I use a hot melt glue gun to smear hot melt over the join, then slide the heat shrink over and use a heat gun to remelt the glue and shrink the heat shrink. The excess hot melt squeezes out the ends and can be trimmed off when it cools.
RaymondR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-07-2018, 18:12   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: New Jersey
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40.3
Posts: 19
Re: Electrical Connection for Nav Lights

Thanks everyone for the advice. While I don’t have a sail locker like the 45 I’ll see if I can locate where the current connection is and leverage that. I never would have thought of hot glue. Great idea.
__________________

Tom_F is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cal, electric, electrical

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Misc. Electrical goodies...solar reg, nav light, remote battery switch, garmin BassMonkey Classifieds Archive 2 08-07-2015 02:22
Fire if improper electrical connection? liveaboardL Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 13 24-11-2014 09:48
Electrical connection for Jabsco water pump Rusty123 Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 6 20-11-2013 09:16
Electrical Connection Advice, Please MarkJ Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 50 01-09-2011 13:33
LED Nav Lights get 'Approval' GordMay Product or Service Reviews & Evaluations 30 03-09-2009 19:57



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:08.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.