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Old 17-10-2006, 08:42   #1
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Best way to find full time captain?

Looking to hire experienced full time (2 to 3 years) captain for 62 ft sailing yacht. What's the best way or place to go to find the right person?
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Old 17-10-2006, 08:56   #2
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There are employment agencies for marine related positions. You might at least start there to get a better understanding of what you really need as far as the details of qualifications go and the current rates for qualified professional people. While you may decide to look on your own at least they will talk with you in an attempt to win the business. Your location will be a serious issue in price.
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Old 17-10-2006, 09:26   #3
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When do I start?

Just kidding. Having been there and done that I've found that Captains also have a time finding good owners. It seems that,in my experience, refferals may be best. Ask some other yacht owners or captains who they might recommend. Also, good delivery captains may not be the best charter boat captains. St. Thomas USVI probably has the highest captain per capita of any port I know of. Then again a Heinekin and a donut is the breakfast of choice.

Good Hunting;
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Old 17-10-2006, 10:35   #4
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Quote:
Ask some other yacht owners or captains who they might recommend.
Ask them if they like their captain a lot then offer that captain a few dollars more. That is the best reccomendation.

Nobody can suggest anyone that is really good, low prioced and that is also available. The best captains can be bought. In the end it really is all about the money.

I have a good freind in the windward islands that has been working boats since he was 14. After 20 some odd years he has been screwed so bad so many times he no longer does this as a full time captain on a private ship. He only does charters and lives on shore with his kids and mother. It is amazing the number of really rich people that want to cheat someone just because they can. It works the other way just as much I'm sure.
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Old 17-10-2006, 10:57   #5
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What exactly do you have in mind, Sir?

I've been in charge of a large private yacht based in St Thomas for the past five years. The owner passed away last year and the estate is keeping me on until a decision is made in regard to the vessel.

I may be available.

I have 30 years experience, current USCG 100 T Master w/ Sail endorsement plus Australian Master Class V licenses, STCW, firefighting, drug certificates and references.

Contact me at personal mail box should you wish to discuss this further.

Sincerely,

Kirk Mcgeorge
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Old 17-10-2006, 11:05   #6
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When do I start? PartII

Paul is pretty much right, money talks. However in retrospect their are owners that I wouldn't work for regardless of dollars. Like a good marriage chemistry is all important. When the honeymoon is over so is a good prenup.

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Old 17-10-2006, 11:49   #7
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We've (my wife & I) been around long enough to understand the money thing.

Money is always an issue. We're willing to pay a fair income but I'm sure what that is can be hard figure.

New quality yacht, world cruise, wife's a gourmet cook, very easy to get along with type people, honest ect. Good fit for someone...

What should I expect to pay in a range per year?
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Old 17-10-2006, 12:41   #8
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Just curious... What is the typical compensation and employee benefits of such a postion?

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Old 18-10-2006, 06:42   #9
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Hi Michael,

Having been in this industry for a bit, both as deckhand and captain, I can point you to a little summary of going rates:

http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:...ient=firefox-a

Also, others are right - it's important to treat your crew fairly. I have also been on the short end of a bad crew position. Extremely rich people that own 100+ ft megayachts, in some cases, are so cheap they'll do anything to save a nickel. For us, one of our bad experiences was a boat that hired us into a "long term" position outside the USA. We got the boat all cleaned up, had the owners aboard for 2 weeks, and they fired us the day the owners left. It was obvious that they were only hiring us because they needed a quick fix to clean up the boat and serve the owners, but didn't want the expense of a crew throughout the years we were supposed to be working. We sold our cars, all our possessions, etc... all for this... to be fired after 1 month without reason or cause. Just because they owner didn't want to pay for us to watch the boat for the rest of the year.

As an owner, you might save a nickel by doing something like that, but you could be destroying someone's life in the process just for greed.

So be nice.





Quote:
Originally Posted by michael201
We've (my wife & I) been around long enough to understand the money thing.

Money is always an issue. We're willing to pay a fair income but I'm sure what that is can be hard figure.

New quality yacht, world cruise, wife's a gourmet cook, very easy to get along with type people, honest ect. Good fit for someone...

What should I expect to pay in a range per year?
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Old 18-10-2006, 12:39   #10
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In that size it is probably $1k/ft/yr so $62k
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Old 19-10-2006, 05:54   #11
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Thank you for the info. A couple things. I've heard stories like that. Can't understand people sometimes. I could never do that to anyone. Whoever the person we choose to employee will have plenty of time to get to know us before we leave.

The other part is the job itself. We'll be in areas where we don't do much for weeks at a time. The job won't be as full time as they may be used to. Lots of time to have fun and discover on their own or with us. Lots of time off other then having to maintain the boat. I have no problem paying a captain around 5K per month for full time work but we believe we might be able to find someone who is looking for a world cruise that they would also enjoy. Maybe someone who could not afford to do something like this themselves in this type of yacht. We're thinking we might find someone like that who is willing to accept less for the experience. That would include food and living exp. We're hoping to pay in the 3 to 4 k range per month and enjoy the trip with us.

I'm sure the fist few moths in the Carib will be busy teaching us to sail a yacht of that size and other things. We want to be the crew in most if not all situations..... I guess if we can't we'll pay someone the 5 or so per month until we feel capable of handling her on our own (could take 6 months or more I know) then take it on our own. We've got plenty of time to look for the right person or couple.
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Old 19-10-2006, 06:05   #12
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Michael,

Ever thing we do is a life experience. If you want to hire someone for a job, treat and pay them fairly. If they contribute to your experience of the sea.. so much the better.. if you to theirs great. You can't expect someone to receive less compensation because you are a terrific guy and your job is being captain on a yacht in the Carib.

Whilst it sounds like a plum job and many would "die" for it, it represents an enormous responsibility. Maybe the airlines should ask pilots to work for less when then have a layover in Hawaii or the Cayman Islands?

I don't know the "going rate".. but I would like to disabuse you of the notion that someone should earn less for a professional assignment because of good company, and wonderful surroundings.

I can recommend a very competant sailor who lives aborad in Antigua and might take the postion. He is one of the best chefs I have ever met and we sailed 6 weeks on a long delivery (with layovers) to Brazil and he never cooked the same meal twice! PM me and I will provide help you find him.

Jef
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Old 19-10-2006, 06:42   #13
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Being a pilot and understanding a little about what pilots make, that is not totally correct. Pilots are not making even CLOSE to what they used to. There are qualified pilots alll over the place willing to accept less then what used to be the norm due to supply and demand and the need to build experience. A corporate pilot frind of mine says that if the VLJ (very light jets) market takes hold, you will be able to find qualified pilots all over the place very soon that would take $50 per hour to fly. That has never been the case. My layovers could be a month at a time with nothing to do unless you choose to on your own. Slightly different then a day or two.

To be honest, I was in an industry that used to pay in the six figures (plus comm) for someone qualified. I'm no longer doing the same thing but the pay is now no more then 60 to 80 per year for same job with same exp. Things change. Please don't tell me captains (yacht) positions are the only job that will never change....

If I can't find someone I like and trust to fit our situation then I'll pay what I have to. It's that simple. I'd be dumb not to try.
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Old 19-10-2006, 08:52   #14
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The principals of supply and demand don't always work for labor and this is a bit veering from the topic. But if some occupation is exclusive and the work is in demand it will receive higher compensation than one less in demand which may require an equivalent skill set.

As a purchaser of labor, or products we all want to pay as little as possible and get as much as possible for it. Hence all the off shoring or work to low cost labor markets. Sadly this has not lowered the cost to the end user as much as it should as too much goes to profits, it results in horrible labor practices and destroys jobs in this country which has raised up the standard of living precisely because of high paying jobs. We are now heading in the opposite direction because... exploitation of labor.

What is someone's time worth... a professional athelete... a ballet dancer... a pilot... an engineer.. and mid leverl manager... corporate management.. a teacher... a cop.. a fireman... a doctor?

I say there is much disparity in what people are paid for their time. But that is capitalism... and for all its benefits it has some very dark and troubling aspects. Unregulated as it is now... it will consume itself and the planet with it.

You get what you pay for in the end. You boat, your family... I am sure you can find some Philipine captain who would take the gig for a lot less than he gets running a big freighter. No?

Jef
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Old 19-10-2006, 09:14   #15
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Off topic? A little I guess. Still true. Lets not turn this into an argument over capitalism v whatever..... Waste of time. However, I love capitalism but to each his own.

What someone is worth? I am a true believer in paying the going rate and honoring my commitments. If I can find an experienced captain that fits my needs and will cost me less then the average going rate, I will choose that. If not, I'll pay what I have to. Supply and demand.

Being a capitalist, I understand the principle of getting what you pay for. My families safety and comfort come first. I have no doubt I will be able to judge a good captain from a bad one. I have ways.... :- }
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