Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-11-2013, 11:30   #16
Registered User
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Burnt Store Marina, SW Florida
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,148
Re: Raymarine Autopilot

Quote:
Originally Posted by laforge24 View Post
I will explain the issue better,
When testing with a second person , one at the helm one below watching the response 1or 2 degrees were not visible, when directly 10 degrees; some movement visible but still no 10 degrees on the compass,
You are jumping to conclusions with no good data!

I just had a similar thing happen when I installed a new N002 Linear Drive motor and replaced the course computer and control head.

EXACTLY the same symptoms you describe. I would tell the AP to go +10 degrees and the rudder would move a degree or two and then 'kinda flutter about but not move any further.

Remember - you, by use of the control head, do not tell the LD how much to move, rather you tell the AP what course to come to. IF the compass is not giving the AP heading data then the AP does not know how to move the rudder.

It turned out the connection to the remote Fluxgate compass had been disturbed and there was no heading data. When I told the autopilot to move the rudder 10 degrees it failed to respond due to the lack of changing heading data.

When I reconnected the fluxgate compass - the AP and LD worked perfectly!

I think you need to pursue a more systematic diagnosis.
__________________

__________________
TacomaSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2013, 11:58   #17
Senior Cruiser
 
colemj's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Presently on US East Coast
Boat: Manta 40 "Reach"
Posts: 10,049
Images: 12
Re: Raymarine Autopilot

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
During the last 19 years I have replaced the gears and motor in my Autohelm/Raymarine Type 1 (now Type 2) Linear Drive. It is cheap and easy.

However, there are several things you need to check:

1) Measure the hard over time on the Linear Drive (LD) arm while it is DISCONNECTED from the rudder. I think it is supposed to be 4.5 seconds from center to hard over but you can look that number up. Then hook the arm back to the rudder and test again. The time should not change.

2) Check the voltage to the LD motor AT the motor while under load. Put the rudder hard over one way then use the Autopilot to drive the motor / rudder all the way the other way and note the voltage - does it drop - does it stay at battery voltage?

Over the years I had to reseat the power and clutch wires at the course computer several times. The older Raymarine connectors at the course computer are not very good and weaken over time.

3) Use a clamp-on amp meter to test the current flow to the LD motor while doing a hard over test. Is it 15 amps (Type 1) or 30 amps (Type 2)?

4) Check the clutch in the LD - you need to be careful here because the drive units are quite powerful. Can you stop the LD from moving the rudder by holding the wheel. Gently increase the resistance and see if you can cause the clutch to slip. The clutch is a magnetic unit and requires good voltage.

6) Check the settings in the control head for:
- hardover time
- maximum rudder angle

It could be that you have told the LD to respond slowly or not far enough

7) Verify the heading display is accurate on all headings and changes rapidly as you rotate the boat about the compass.

8) Verify the rudder angle is properly displayed, reflects the actual state of the rudder, and moves as the rudder moves

We sailed and motored over 12,000 miles with our Linerar Drive Type 1 (15 amp motor) in a cruiser that weighted 23,000 pounds in local sailing trim and 26,000+ pounds when in cruising trip. The LD happily and easily managed the boat downwind in 35 knots and 12' seas many times. A Type 1 has plenty of power for 22,000 pounds.
All of this is very good advice except for #3. The motor will only draw the current it needs to do the task asked. Unless there is a lot of force against the rudder or the steering system is very stiff, the current used to do a hard over test will be much less than 15A, and will be the same for the Type1 and Type2. Even in boisterous conditions, our Type2 rarely draws more than 5-6A.

But measuring the current is a good troubleshooting thing here.

Mark
__________________

__________________
www.svreach.com

You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.
colemj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2013, 12:36   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: france/dordogne
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Lavezz 40ft
Posts: 197
Re: Raymarine Autopilot

I have just received the identity of this AP Raymarine ST6001 & GYROcompass
if I am not mistaken this is a hydrualic unit
anybody have some blowout info on this one?
__________________
laforge24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2013, 16:24   #19
Senior Cruiser
 
colemj's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Presently on US East Coast
Boat: Manta 40 "Reach"
Posts: 10,049
Images: 12
Re: Raymarine Autopilot

I don't think you are paying attention. TacomaSailor is giving you good advice and it has nothing to do with opening up the electronics. You do not appear to have a hydraulic drive unit. The ST6001 is a control head, not a drive unit, and is not hydraulic.

You really need to step back and do a bit of methodical troubleshooting like has been suggested.

Mark
__________________
www.svreach.com

You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.
colemj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2013, 19:40   #20
Registered User
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Burnt Store Marina, SW Florida
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,148
Re: Raymarine Autopilot

Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj View Post
All of this is very good advice except for #3. The motor will only draw the current it needs to do the task asked. Unless there is a lot of force against the rudder or the steering system is very stiff, the current used to do a hard over test will be much less than 15A, and will be the same for the Type1 and Type2. Even in boisterous conditions, our Type2 rarely draws more than 5-6A.

But measuring the current is a good troubleshooting thing here.

Mark
You are 100% correct. I sometimes miss the details when I write a lot. Either prevent the rudder from turning and see if the course computer CAN deliver the rated amps (15 for Type 1 or 30 for Type 2) when stalled.

OR - measure the current with no load on the rudder and then watch the amperage increase as you increase the resistance to turning the rudder. The course computer, and associated wiring, should be able to deliver considerably more current, with NO or very little, voltage drop as the resistance to turning the rudder increases.

Some of the subtle aspects of electrical trouble shooting are hard to fit into a 10 line forum post.

Systematic diagnosis that tests and eliminates one potential problem at a time is the way to proceed with the minimum of frustration and confusion.
__________________

__________________
TacomaSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
autopilot, marine, raymarine

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:22.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.