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Old 27-12-2006, 08:26   #46
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I've got a Mahe on order but have to wait until Nov 2007 for delivery

I'm actually gonna pick her up in La Rochelle and bring her across the pond with my brother... my first offshore passage, I must be mad!

The only thing that worries me about the design is ventilation in the bows. It looks like the only way to get fresh air in is through the escape hatches which is a little troubling, I'm just afraid the head will be a sauna in warmer climes.

I also wonder why they didn't raise the escape hatches further above the waterline, looks like there's plenty of room and I seem to remember reading an FP was lost in the Caribbean when an escape hatch mysteriously opened while underway.

Still she looks great and Iím looking forward to finally seeing one in the flesh at the boat show">Miami boat show.
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Old 30-12-2006, 00:41   #47
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just booked flights to see the Mahe 36 at the Auckland Boat Show at the start of March.

Is the NZ owner a reader here?

daniel
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Old 30-12-2006, 02:17   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kipper
I've got a Mahe on order but have to wait until Nov 2007 for delivery

I'm actually gonna pick her up in La Rochelle and bring her across the pond with my brother... my first offshore passage, I must be mad!
Although I'd done thousands of miles around the coast of Britain and across to France, my first serious offshore passage was delivering my boat from Les Sables d'Olonne - just up the coast from La Rochelle - to the Caribbean.

As I'd also only sailed any sort of cat for two weekends I took a Privilege delivery skipper with me as far as the Canaries so he could teach me my boat and also about cat sailing in general. I was very glad I did as he was a great guy who taught me a lot.

You might look at doing the same... maybe just as far as Portugal.
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Old 31-12-2006, 07:44   #49
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Although I'd done thousands of miles around the coast of Britain and across to France, my first serious offshore passage was delivering my boat from Les Sables d'Olonne - just up the coast from La Rochelle - to the Caribbean.

As I'd also only sailed any sort of cat for two weekends I took a Privilege delivery skipper with me as far as the Canaries so he could teach me my boat and also about cat sailing in general. I was very glad I did as he was a great guy who taught me a lot.

You might look at doing the same... maybe just as far as Portugal.

I've sailed a cat before but just baby sailing in the Virgin Islands

The Bay of Biscay is probably the most worrying passage but I've got plenty of time so I can wait for a good weather window. It does have a fairly fearsome reputation though, especially at that time if the year, so it's definitely not a passage to be taken lightly.

I did consider a captain for that first leg but with the right storm gear (drogue / para-anchor) and a conservative approach I feel pretty comfortable.

Just counting down the months to the big trip now
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Old 31-12-2006, 13:41   #50
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Kipper I thought of doing what you want to do.since my boat was suppose to be done in December several people told me that may be it was not such a good idea to be in the bay of Biscay in late december. anyway my boat is not ready now....should be in Ft Lauderdale some time in the near future.JC.
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Old 14-01-2007, 02:47   #51
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Jean... Just been aboard a Mahe at the London Boat Show. I was really surprised how spaciouss it felt for a 36ft cat. Most impressed. Only negative which I think has been mentioned earlier in the thread is the Bimini. Absolutely useless.
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Old 15-01-2007, 05:27   #52
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Jeannius it is good to hear your comments.I don't understand why they came up with such a useless bimini.We will have to come up with a better idea......
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Old 20-01-2007, 10:48   #53
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I just saw a picture of a Mahe 36 and the first thing that came to mind was Star Wars. It looks like a stormtrooper helmut. I would guess that this boat should have special appeal to George Lucus fans. May the Force be with you!
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Old 20-01-2007, 14:55   #54
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steve I guess that's what you call Euro style,you either love it or hate it!
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Old 22-01-2007, 15:45   #55
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[quote=Kipper]I've got a Mahe on order but have to wait until Nov 2007 for delivery

I'm actually gonna pick her up in La Rochelle and bring her across the pond with my brother... my first offshore passage, I must be mad!


I had my new Privilige 39 sailed by delivery skipper from Sable d'Olonne, France to Felixtowe, England. On the delivery, the skipper ran into something and knocked an eight inch hole in the starboard bow. Fortuantely, there is a collison bulkhead about a foot back from the bow, and only a few liters of water entered into the small water-tight compartment ahead of the collision bulkhead. Sounds like bad luck. Right?

Well, actually it probably turned out to be good luck. We ground out the temporary repair to the bow after the boat arrived in Fort Lauderdale. Then we massively beefed up the bow so the glass was about twice as thick as normal. This came in handy when we were sailing in the Indian Ocean south of Sri Lanka after the Global Tsunami because there were giant logs floating in the water, and at night this same bow ran into a log in the dark. Because the bow was so beefed up, we only chipped the gel coat. So there you have it. Sometimes what seems to be bad turns out to be something good. For pictures, check out DEBRIOSAURUS* REX* THE TREE THAT WANTED TO EAT MY BOAT* Once upon a time there was a tree that wanted to eat my boat

With respect to sailing across the Bay of Biscay in winter. You are a braver person than I. The distances are just too great to be guaranteed a weather window that keeps you from getting hurt. On the other hand, it could be a real opportunity to get some experience with a parachute sea anchor or drogue.

Go to Maxingout.com and click on Maxingout Podcast #1 - The Perfect Storm, and you can hear what it's like to deal with a storm using drogues and parachutes.

I personally wouldn't make the trip across the Biscay in the winter in a new untested yacht even if I had a parachute sea anchor and a drogue. The parachute attachment points have not been tested, and the Mahi 36 has bridle attachments to the forward crossbeam. I wouldn't put a parachute to a crossbeam because of the risk of pulling out the crossbeam and doing a backward capsize.

If I were in your shoes, I would delay the delivery of my catamaran from the factory until the spring when I could do proper sea trials and I would have time to prepare the boat for the transatlantic passage.

If delay was impossible, I would seriously consider shipping it transatlantic at that time of year.

When we crossed the Atlantic, we had three days of 45 knot winds on the trip from Gibraltar to the Canaries during the month of November. If you want to see what it's like to be in those conditions dragging warps, go to Video and click on the video called WARP SPEED. That was a relatively easy storm to deal with, although the monohulls that we were sailing with were taking knockdowns, filling their cockpits with water. One monohull got two inches of water in their galley.

I don't want to discourage you, but at the same time, if your boat isn't fully prepared for what could happen, the amount of damge you could sustain could easily exceed the cost of shipping.


I confess that I am a belt and suspenders type of person who builds hundred ton bridges and then drives twenty ton trucks over them. But, so far, I have survived intact, knock on wood. I have an exceptionally well equipped catamaran that takes a licking and keeps on ticking. But part of the reason that I'm still around is that I sail offshore in the right season.

If you do choose to cross the Bay of Biscay in the winter, be sure to take a video camera because you may have an opportunity to capture some awesome footage.

Keep on keeping on mate, and good luck

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Old 22-01-2007, 17:10   #56
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Thank you, Dave, for the perspective of your experience.

Frankly, the Bay of Biscay scares me. I don't think I want anything to do with it during that time of the year, regardless if the boat has been tried and tested, or not. See attached for the reason.

Sure, I want to play with my new toy -- for a long time.

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Old 23-01-2007, 07:09   #57
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Interesting stuff Dave.Just one question!you are talking about using Parachute or Drogue from the bow ,I thought it is not a good idea on a cat,and that you should always do it from the stern and run away from heavy seas....JC.
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Old 23-01-2007, 08:10   #58
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Quote:
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Interesting stuff Dave.Just one question!you are talking about using Parachute or Drogue from the bow ,I thought it is not a good idea on a cat,and that you should always do it from the stern and run away from heavy seas....JC.
I use the 18 foot diamater parachute from the bow, and the drogues from the stern.

On the bows I have 25 inch chainplates installed in the decks that I attach the parachute to. That gives the bridle a secure attachment to the port and starboard hulls. It's bullet proof and chafe proof, and represents my ultimate survival tool if the worst should happen.

The drogues are trailed from the stern. They do an awesome job of controlling boat speed when running downwind in a gale. I have two drogues on board. I have a 120 cone Jordan series drogue, and I have never used this particular drogue. The only time I have used a drogue was running downwind for three days on the way to the Canary Islands from Gibraltar. In this particular instance, I used an "Abbott" drogue that I have named after myself. This drogue consists of loops of one inch three strand nylon that I loop behind the catamaran. But the loops are more than simply loops of rope. On these loops of rope I install carriers that I slide down the ropes to increase the effect of the drogue. What are these carriers? I simply use four foot sections of plastic water hose as the carriers and on these carriers I wrap anchor chain, dingy chain, dingy anchors, or whatever, and I tie these heavy weights securely to the hose carriers. I slip the plastic water hose carriers over the loops of rope, and then slide those carriers down the rope and into the water. The carriers with attached weights immediately slide back to the middle of the rope loop that I am trailing in the water. If I want more drogue effect, I put more carriers and more weight on my warps and then let them slide down the rope loop and slow the boat down even more. The "Abbott" drogue is an infinitely adjust loop of rope in which you can send as many carriers and weight down the loop as you need to use in order to control your speed when running downwind.

I like the "Abbott" drogue because it does a couple of things.
1. You can adjust the power of the drogue. If you need more drogue power, you simply send another carrier with attached weights down the rope loop to increase the drag in the water.
2. You can adjust the distance of the drogue from the boat by simply letting out more warp or taking in more of the warp loop using winches. The drogue should be consistently on the back side of any charging seas so that you are pulling the drogue through the wave rather than out of the front of the wave and losing drogue effect.
3. You can easily retrieve the drogue when you don't need it any more by winching it in with your cockpit winches. And when you winch it in, the carriers and the attached weight stay centered in the warp loop as you haul it in. That means you don't lose drogue effect and at the same time it's easy to retrieve once it's right behind the yacht.
4. You can construct an "Abbott" drogue using materials that are already on the yacht, and it's not expensive. You need at least 200 feet of line, and three or four pieces of flexible plastic water hose to use as carriers, and anchor chain and dingy anchors to attach to the carriers with shackles and ties.

If you want to see how it really works, go to my web site and view captainslogarchive27 - Survive The Savage Seas. There you will see a picture of two warps behind the catamaran in 40 knots of wind and eighteen foot seas out in the Atlantic. SURVIVING THE SAVAGE SEAS

There is also a complete account of what it was like to use the "Abbott" drogue.

It worked for me, and it might work well for you.

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Old 23-01-2007, 09:25   #59
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Dave thank you for all this information....awsome.I will take time to go trhough your website. Compare to you I feel very humble,our cat is coming soon,so the learning process will start soon......JC.
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Old 23-01-2007, 13:11   #60
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Maxingout.... Great video. Wonderful to see how stable everything was and how little drama even in 40 knots of breeze.
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