Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-09-2014, 07:56   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pittwater, Australia
Boat: Fontaine, Bahia, 46
Posts: 6
Jack lines on FP's

We're in the process of preparing our boat for extended cruising and would like some advice from other FP owners about whether you use jack lines and if so, what attachment points do you use? We always had them rigged on our previous monohull but not sure what people do on the cats. It would seem sensible to have them rigged as far inboard as possible but there are no obvious existing attachment points on our boat. Would appreciate any ideas/advice from those of you who are already out there doing bluewater passages.
__________________

__________________
Illusionv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 08:34   #2
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,336
Re: Jack lines on FP's

I have a smaller cat (34'), but I do use jacklines when alone, at night, or cold water. A few general thoughts relevant to cats:

1. Yes, run them well inboard. I run them from the aft edge of the hard top to the inboard edge of the tramp about 4' aft of the cross beam.
2. You will likely need very long tethers (>6') to cover the tramp and will need to make your own. There is a bunch of stuff re. that on my blog.
3. Compared to a mono the risks are different, because the motion is different. Sliding on a sloping deck is not a problem, and there is little reason to be working near the lee bow (forestay is in the center). On the other hand, cats are more prone to stopping if you bury the bow in a wave, throwing you forward. Thus, the jackline should stop well short of the bow.
4. Cats are more likely to throw you to windward when passing the cabin (quick motion). Thus the jackline should be inboard and sometimes used as a hand rail.
5. Have a clip point at deck level at the forestay; with cats the problem is getting lifted off the tramp; the lacing can work, if strong. Otherwise, bolt hangers are very handy.

As for attachment points, consider the inside flange of the hull (where the tramp laces) and any hand rails on the cabin top. Bolt hangers can be handy.

Sail Delmarva: Bolt Hangers--A Strong Point For Small Dollars


As for bow anchors, this is what I did, but I might go further aft. I used a bolt hanger through an existing hole, with a backing plate. I found that if I ran the line just below the edge it was not under foot nor a tripping hazard.
__________________

__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 20:07   #3
DtM
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Out of the Office
Posts: 908
Re: Jack lines on FP's

Is that your anchor winch set up on the port bow?

Interesting.
__________________
DtM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 22:29   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
maxingout's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Pierce, Phoenix
Boat: Privilege 39 Catamaran, Exit Only
Posts: 2,606
Re: Jack lines on FP's

We started our circumnavigation with jacklines at deck level, and we finished the circumnavigation with jacklines at chest height. At chest height, they kept us from falling overboard, and we could still clip on to them with our safety harness when going forward.

And if the weather was really rough, I had one spare halyard that had about twenty feet of extra length that could go to any place on deck. If a person was going forward in really bad weather, they could clip into the halyard, and if they went over the side, they were already attached to a halyard and could be winched back on board.

SURVIVING THE DANGER ZONES ON BOARD EXIT ONLY¬*¬*¬* Exit Only has an extremely safe cockpit for offshore sailing
__________________
Dave -Sailing Vessel Exit Only

http://SailingUNI.com
http://maxingout.com
http://PositiveThinkingSailor.com
maxingout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 10:38   #5
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,336
Re: Jack lines on FP's

Quote:
Originally Posted by DtM View Post
Is that your anchor winch set up on the port bow?

Interesting.
Yes, and it is a compromise. So far I'm happy with it and would do it that way again. In general (many design variations)...

Pluses
a. The chain locker is right there.
b. Easy to attach or adjust the bridle.
c. Easier to futz with a stuck or spun anchor.
d. Easier to manage if the windlass breaks.
e. Generally easier to access on everything.

Minuses
a. The bridle has to be used every time.
b. The windlass goes underwater. But I got 17 years out of the first one.
c. Chain weight is forward. But in only carry 100' of chain (balance is line--shallow water around here).

Some folks mount 2, but I've always through having 2 anchors through rollers is asking for monster tangles when the boat spins. I prefer to attach the 2nd rode to the first rode (2nd rode is mostly rope) a few feet below the roller.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 10:51   #6
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,336
Re: Jack lines on FP's

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxingout View Post
We started our circumnavigation with jacklines at deck level, and we finished the circumnavigation with jacklines at chest height. At chest height, they kept us from falling overboard, and we could still clip on to them with our safety harness when going forward.

And if the weather was really rough, I had one spare halyard that had about twenty feet of extra length that could go to any place on deck. If a person was going forward in really bad weather, they could clip into the halyard, and if they went over the side, they were already attached to a halyard and could be winched back on board.

SURVIVING THE DANGER ZONES ON BOARD EXIT ONLY¬*¬*¬* Exit Only has an extremely safe cockpit for offshore sailing
Though I like a lot of these ideas, I tried the halyard idea and it was a glaring failure. Perhaps it is boat-specific. In my case, if the halyard was slack the line whipped around and caught in the diamond wires. If the halyard had less slack, it could lift you off your feet unless someone VERY belayed it carefully. I found it dangerous. But I like the out side the box thinking.

Might work on a different boat. Try it.

----

The chest-height jacklines is a good idea. Mine start on the hard top (chest level) and angle downwards, eventually following the chine of the deck (where they are easy to step over). My boat is center cockpit (deep) so jackline are a non-issue there. We use fixed tethers if working near the transoms (either securing dingy or landing fish... or sometimes just sitting on the swim platform dragging feet in the water to cool off).

---

The answer is to try different things in fair weather and fix the problems. The nice thing about the bolt hangers is that you can use an existing hole while sorting things out.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 15:38   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pittwater, Australia
Boat: Fontaine, Bahia, 46
Posts: 6
Re: Jack lines on FP's

Thanks guys, some really useful info there. Because your boats are different designs to ours I think we'll just have to play around with the best position for our anchor points (we don't have handrails on the cabin top) but could possibly put in some strong points on the aft end of the cabin top, utilising the backing plates for the winches.
__________________
Illusionv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 17:26   #8
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,336
Re: Jack lines on FP's

There might be enough meat in the salon "eyebrow" near the aft edge. So long as the tether can reach into the cockpit from there, you're good. I leave my tethers on the jacklines and only clip when I leave the cockpit, which seems safe for your boat.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2014, 19:11   #9
Registered User

Join Date: May 2014
Location: Oak Hill, VA
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Helia 44
Posts: 50
Re: Jack lines on FP's

I'm going on an extended sail also and have the same question, but not crazy about installing new hardware to accommodate the jack lines. What is the collective wisdom about using the bow and stern cleats? The obvious downside being that it is not at all close to the centerline, in fact as far from it as could be. Note: yes, I am aware of the engineering/design flaw of the factory installed stern cleats.
__________________
SailMonAmi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2014, 19:25   #10
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,336
Re: Jack lines on FP's

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailMonAmi View Post
I'm going on an extended sail also and have the same question, but not crazy about installing new hardware to accommodate the jack lines. What is the collective wisdom about using the bow and stern cleats? The obvious downside being that it is not at all close to the centerline, in fact as far from it as could be. Note: yes, I am aware of the engineering/design flaw of the factory installed stern cleats.
At least use the front cross arm 4' inboard.

If the lines are far enough in you can allow yourself some stretch, which lowers the load and permits lower strength mountings.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-09-2014, 13:00   #11
Registered User
 
Dreaming Yachtsman's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Kennewick, WA
Posts: 490
Images: 5
Send a message via Skype™ to Dreaming Yachtsman
Re: Jack lines on FP's

At night and in heavy weather I run a line from the stbd leg of the bow A-frame along the deck to the stbd stern cleat. I keep just enough slack in it to allow me to climb on top of the cabin while reefing the main. So far I have not had to rely on it to keep me out of the drink - perhaps I should test it in warm calm waters before my next overnighter.
__________________

__________________
John
Formerly S/V Yachtsman's Dream
Go sailing now. Life is too short not to enjoy it.
Dreaming Yachtsman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lipari 41: Lipari jack lines Dod42 Fountaine Pajot 2 23-10-2014 13:31
For Sale: (2) Wichard Jack Lines ceto Classifieds Archive 0 25-04-2014 09:23
Want To Buy: Jack Lines and Harness for 38' trimming out Classifieds Archive 0 10-06-2011 10:46
For Sale: Jack Lines DCGSAILING Classifieds Archive 1 03-02-2011 08:52
Siting of Jack Lines Snorkel Health, Safety & Related Gear 4 02-04-2010 10:26



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 18:22.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.