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Old 13-11-2007, 12:53   #1
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Old 28-11-2007, 13:54   #2
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Picture+078.jpg (image)

My question is:

Is the rudder deeper than the keel and unprotected?
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Old 28-11-2007, 14:10   #3
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I was looking at my boat on land the other day,and the rudders are about the same depth as the quille.If you run aground your rudders will also hit the bottom,this can be a problem,I wish they had made them a little shorter.JC.
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Old 28-11-2007, 18:12   #4
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in sailing trim I think that keel is deeper by 2 inches
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Old 28-11-2007, 18:43   #5
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I can't remember whether the keels are in whole or part sacrificial in the event of a serious grounding.

If they are sacrificial then maybe spares might be kept in each general location of a "fleet" of boats.
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Old 29-11-2007, 06:37   #6
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Hello DtM
the keels are sacrificials.They slide into a groove and are glued .So they can be removed to be rebuilt or replaced .
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Old 29-11-2007, 21:12   #7
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A few more pictures to help with the sacrificial keel, which is deeper by an inch or 2 in sailing trim and you can ground on a flat surface without both the keel and rudder touching at the same time. Plus this boat has the factory Max Props fitted, must be a speed junky
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Old 20-12-2007, 17:42   #8
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Looking at the pictures of the Mahe 36 I notice the sail drive is installed behind the rudder. Can some one tell me how the steerage performs under power at low speed both forward and aft ? It was obviously installed aft of the rudder due to space restrictions ?
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Old 20-12-2007, 19:04   #9
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I don't come from a sailing background but I have had no issues maneuvering around our marina (everyday since delivery)
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Old 21-12-2007, 00:44   #10
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Looking at the pictures of the Mahe 36 I notice the sail drive is installed behind the rudder. Can some one tell me how the steerage performs under power at low speed both forward and aft ? It was obviously installed aft of the rudder due to space restrictions ?
Makes no difference at all. You manoeuvre a cat at low speed using both engines and leave the wheel alone. So, flow over the rudders doesn't matter at all.

Of course, if you are down to only one engine, then it'll make a difference.
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Old 21-12-2007, 01:24   #11
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Whilst Jeannius is generally correct in saying it makes no difference for most low speed manoeuvres I do find the ability to use prop flow over the rudder handy in some cases.

If you turn the wheel hard to stbd and then give the engines a quick burst of ahead the prop wash will tend to force the stern across to port with very little fwd motion. With judicious use of fwd and astern it is possible to move our boat sideways with very little fore and aft movement. This can be very useful if parking in a small gap alongside a wall for instance. It is also quite handy when coming alonside a pontoon - aquick burst of power against the angled rudder can push the stern towards the pontoon to make getting off very much easier for the crew.

Although not used very often this technique is very a very handy weapon to have when you need it. I am sure you can acheive the same end without the prop wash but it will be a bit more difficult.
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Old 21-12-2007, 07:45   #12
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Whilst Jeannius is generally correct in saying it makes no difference for most low speed manoeuvres I do find the ability to use prop flow over the rudder handy in some cases.

If you turn the wheel hard to stbd and then give the engines a quick burst of ahead the prop wash will tend to force the stern across to port with very little fwd motion. With judicious use of fwd and astern it is possible to move our boat sideways with very little fore and aft movement. This can be very useful if parking in a small gap alongside a wall for instance. It is also quite handy when coming alonside a pontoon - aquick burst of power against the angled rudder can push the stern towards the pontoon to make getting off very much easier for the crew.

Although not used very often this technique is very a very handy weapon to have when you need it. I am sure you can acheive the same end without the prop wash but it will be a bit more difficult.

I'd forgotten about that one. I keep meaning to try it while well away from anything hard. Must remember to have a practice sometime
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Old 19-03-2008, 16:46   #13
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Hello,
I find this thread very interesting, I have made a few posts here but will say I don’t own one but was very excited when I saw the first design on paper. I thought it had some parts I would add to like a shower door but I think for the size of 36 feet it is, a average size sail boat certainly not a enter level cost. 340 nicely equipped from the Miami boat show. But I never really thought about boat noise as to what is being discussed here. Is the noise happening under sail, why would you not be able to sleep I found that most of the noise from my old boat came from the water hitting the hull and put me to sleep while under way. Is the creaking happening while at anchor or at dock. I noticed a lot of people who have commented on the noise don’t show they own one what are the owners finding out. And than one more question, When it comes to flex how do you know your sail boat is flexing do you actually see it? I have never seen a boat flex was wondering what it looked like. J Just adding a little humor.
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Old 28-07-2008, 14:26   #14
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When we were in the keys I saw a cat pull next to us,had something in the water on each side,so I went to check it out,the guy had jumper cables tied up to the stays and the other end in the water.So I asked him what this was for,his reply was lightning protection......I wonder has anybody done that and does it works...? Sounds like pretty cheap fixing to me.
JC.
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Old 28-07-2008, 14:39   #15
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lightning

JC
cheap but not very easy to go sailing with
You can also ground your chain from chainplates to the water
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