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Old 01-05-2003, 05:12   #16
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Additional thoughts!

Let me add this to the discussion.
Cats with the dagger boards up do not have deep keels, like monohulls, to slow down a sideways slip (broaching) . And I'm sure an experianced cat sailor would not run in a real rough sea with boards down. He would be more concerned with keeping it nosed into the wind/waves either under power or with a sea anchor. Every Captian should know the limits of their vessel before treking into such an enviroment. An offshore vesssel not a lightweight racing cat.
Where Monohulls have a weighted keel way below the waterline when broached actually assist in a roll over.
imagine this experiment, take a frying pan and put it on snowbank at 45* and also a sausage with a toothpick stuck thru the middle with a lead fishing weight at one end, let them go and see what happens. I'm sure the sausage will just roll down the hill and the fryng pan will just slide which is what a Cat will most likely do if broached. And were talking about open seas now not the surf where the troughs are close together. Cats sit on top of the water and monohulls are deep in the water. If your in a breaking sea offshore your in trouble anyway, you better be on a sea anchor with all sails down (except stay sail) and hope your vessel can take the pounding..............._/)
My $.02
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Old 01-05-2003, 05:53   #17
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Thanks, Del, that actually makes some sense. Sort of the styrofoam cup analogy. And true, mono's with deep fin keels can 'trip' over their keels. Not so much the hull form I have, a modified full keel, 4.5 ft draft, with a CB.

Interesting stuff. I need a ride in one.

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Old 02-05-2003, 03:11   #18
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A ride on one might change your life. I have a friend who knows this, and specifically says he will not step onto a cat. It could ruin his enjoyment of what he has.

Do you suppose that is the primary reason women don't want their husbands to sleep around?
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Old 02-05-2003, 03:44   #19
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I do often enjoy living in ignorant bliss...But I am willing to take my chances.
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Old 02-05-2003, 03:57   #20
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I don't know about my husband sleeping around, because I don't have one. But ask just about any multihull owner, formerly monohull owner, if they'll go back to having a monohull, and they'll cry, "NOOOOO!!!!!! NEVER!!!!!"

Also, maybe the visual of some surfer dude on "Waiamia" (How the heck do you spell that?!) Bay, falling down a verticle 40' wave contributes to the knock down, rollover fears of mono folks. The truth is, a 20 or thirty foot bluewater wave is like a huge long hill, without nearly that steep a face. Boats, whatever kind, tend to float over the water, in my experience.

I'm remembering a satellite photo of waves in the Pacific, that had a "period" between sets that was two miles. Didn't say how high the waves were.

Now, when there are confused seas, such as in the Mona Passage, off Puerto Rico, and there's current fighting waves, you get steep stuff, but still not anywhere near verticle, and rarely more than fifteen feet. I've only been through that passage once, and would definitely wait for a window, mostly just for comfort.

There is a big basic difference between feather weight racing designs, and heavy "floating condos". Vinga does not regularly sail at twelve knots, like Naga, a Newick design tri owned by some friends fo mine. They read a magazine, and quickly get the weight off the boat, no joke!

But they don't flip upside down. Another fellow I know sailed his rather stubby tri around the world twice, and once he told me he'd *tried* to turn the boat over, and couldn't. Low aspect rig, and I believe him, that he tried.

Ah, to be sailing right now....

Cheers,

Melissa
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Old 02-05-2003, 06:48   #21
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Catamarans

It's only money!



............_/)
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Old 08-07-2003, 15:58   #22
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Sunsail?

Quote:
Gisle once whispered in the wind:
Yes, I own a FP Belize 43. It's in charter with Sunsail in the Seychelles until March 2005 (3,5 years contract). I bought the boat new in 2001.
Gisle,

I am interested in learning more about having a boat in charter with Sunsail. I was looking at the 5.5 year contract. Are you satisfied with the services they provide (particularly maintenance and care for your boat)? Would you recommend them?

Do you use all 10 of your Sunsail units every year? Do you buy extra units? Have you used their Short Notice program? Do you mainly sail on your boat or others in their program?

thanks,
--gray
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Old 08-08-2003, 13:38   #23
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Hello!!
I'm a recent owener of a 1991 FP37 Antigua with tired Volvo 2001's. I have not seen a boat more well laid out than the FP boats. The factory has and is supporting me on all questions I have asked. They even faxed me the plans for the dingy davits since the company who made them is out of business. I'm using a lot of time and money to bring Dalliance back up to my standards and look forward to any information that could help.

Tom
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Old 11-05-2006, 08:48   #24
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I really enjoyed reading all your comments.well I am a brand new FP owner,I haven't got my boat yet,probably by year end.I hear a lot of negative things about FP cats and how cheaply they are buit.....if you could comment on that.My boat will be based in Tampa bay,florida.
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Old 11-05-2006, 14:14   #25
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Of "cheaply built" boats.

My Lagoon 42 is hull #6 of the (then) new sort of cruising boat, the large catamaran. The builders over-built catamarans those days, in the early 1990's. A fellow in a boatyard commented that Lagoon's are poorly built, not strong enough. I showed him a plug of my hull that I saved when someone drilled a big hole for a depth sounder. I didn't know they were doing that until they were done, I could've spat. Anyway, Vinga's hull in places is more than an inch of solid laid fiberglass. She's incredibly strong. I hit something that ripped off one rudder. I knew something was wrong, but not what, until 450 miles later when I got where I was going, and saw the stub while snorkelling around the boat.

My stays and shrouds are huge. The boat is heavy and slowwwww. If I'm going over eight knots, the boat has to push so much water out of the way that the ride is uncomfortable, unless there are no seas. (haha)

I've seen new catamarans that are very lightly built, only two layers of glass on either side of foam core. What I hit would perhaps have ripped off the entire underside of the boat.

Go around the boat and knock on it with your knuckles. That ought to hurt. If it's soft, and doesn't hurt, your boat isn't strong. Sailing is always a gamble, so is driving a car. A boat can be just fine being not strong if you sail gently, and are lucky. Always take down sail early! Mono hulls heel over and spill excess wind. Multis absorb the extra energy and go faster, so the rigging and boat must be stronger. Monohulls put up sail judged by the gusts, multis must sail by the steady breeze, and have little enough sail to handle the extra strain of gusts. That means sailing conservatively.

Fiberglass is becoming more and more expensive, so all plastic boats will be more lightly built and more expensive for what you get. And there will always be folks who say nasty things about your boat, as well as the praise-sayers. Pffft to the nasties.

Cheers,

Melissa
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Old 11-05-2006, 14:25   #26
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Thanks for your input Melissa.Since this is going to be a brand new design I am a little concern,but at the same time I am sure that they have learned a lot over the past few years.I will post some pictures when available.
JC.
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Old 14-05-2006, 14:40   #27
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We have a Bahia 46 from 1998, bought after over 5 years of charter in the Caribbean. We are still fixing all they broke or mis-maintained on board, but it is coming at a slower rate now.

We sailed all around the Caribbean in the past 14 months and have made good speed. The captain loves the ease of handling under power, with 2 engines (new).
The mate has finally got a handle at lifting the main sail without getting exhausted.
Some parts of the boat seem lightly built and the first thing we did, was to reinforce the bottom of the 2 hulls, at the junction between the molded fiberglass halves, with 2 or 3 layers of added fiber. Overall, the hull now is a reasonnable strength/weight compromise.
Our last hairy episode was when one of the side rigging togles broke partially and we could have lost the mast if we hadn't seen it in time.
We learned that stainless rigging on cats only lasts about 7 years in the tropics: if your's is older, make sure to check for micro-cracks due to corrosion. With only 3 wires to hold our mast, we decided to replace both side cables as well.

Positives: Comfort, stability, manoeuvrability, speed, stable even in rough anchorages, all around view from the main cabin, space, including very spacious engine rooms, low draft.
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Old 15-05-2006, 06:17   #28
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Claire thank you for those good infos.you know this is why I went ahead and boat a new boat...i figured this would be my last boat ,I want to spend my time sailing,enjoying my friends and good wines.I liked what you said about the positives,this is exactly why I have chosen a Cat.I really think the market for Cats is going to explode in the near future.Thanks again.
JC.
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Old 15-05-2006, 08:14   #29
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JC - you should not have a problem with a brand new FJ. The light build becomes a problem after several years chartering where the boat gets just worn out, whereas the heavier cats like the lagoons can absorb more punishment. As yours has not been chartered it will not get so much wear so should be fine.
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Old 15-05-2006, 08:36   #30
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Thanks for making me feel better Talbot.I had a chance to get on a Lavezzi 40 at the Miami show,I kind like what I saw,mine will be 36' but very similar in the layout,lots of open space,same level cockpit and salon,very light colors,easy handling for 2 persons.I hope to post some pictures soon for comments.
JC.
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