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Old 09-06-2011, 06:36   #31
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Re: Emergency Pumping

I understand that creating completely watertight compartments is not practical for most boats - but I don't see why most couldn't install the means to quickly partition off compartments (and lockers etc) in times of emergency. If a hole in the bow it doesn't have to mean uncontrolled flooding in the saloon and engine room (and vice verse etc) - the best bouyancy is the rest of the boat. and if your luck is in could mean that a hole was simply inside a locker, that could simply be sealed - outside can be dealt with later.
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:04   #32
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Re: Emergency Pumping

I carry a basic electrical pump with 1" discharge hose from Home depot. Connect it to aux. generator and you have all the pump you need. Does not run your batteries down and pumps a lot of water.
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:12   #33
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Re: Emergency Pumping

We have reasonable crash bulkheads - will bolster them on next haulout.
I read a book about a catamaran rescue.
He took on water in one hull - unknown reason.
Eventually the extra weight in one hull flipped the catamaran.
The owner said in hindsight he should have flooded the other hull to prevent capsize - tough choice to make...
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:24   #34
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Re: Emergency Pumping

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Originally Posted by C4 King Cobra View Post
I carry a basic electrical pump with 1" discharge hose from Home depot. Connect it to aux. generator and you have all the pump you need. Does not run your batteries down and pumps a lot of water.
I was planning to buy something similar.
What model/HP/voltage is it?
thanks
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:32   #35
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Re: Emergency Pumping

I'm no expert (I find myself saying that alot) but IMO 1" isn't going to do much unless its a pretty small hole...of course it depends on how far below the water line the hole is
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:45   #36
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Re: Emergency Pumping

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Originally Posted by motion30 View Post
The trash pumps are great and pump a ton of water but that engine sea water pump is already there I like that idea
8 gpm doesn't stack up well against 300 gpm.

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Originally Posted by AllezCat View Post
A 100-200HP engine has what flow rate in its raw water pump???
15 - 30 gpm.
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:48   #37
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Re: Emergency Pumping

I was looking at something like this:
Residential Product
has almost 4000 gph from 0 to 20' of head. This is the difference between a "real" pump and the tinny little things sold in marine stores...
But I would want confirmation on what I consider a good benchmark:
the flow thru a busted 1.5" thru hull...
If it is 8000 then this pump is not worth it...IMO
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Old 09-06-2011, 08:51   #38
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Re: Emergency Pumping

It's been said several times that your engine cooling pump doesn't move much water. I looked up a Jabsco 1673 series pump. This is a small 1/2" rubber impeller pump that might be used on a small sail boat engine or generator. It will move 11 GPM (660 GPH) at 10 feet of head at 1750 RPM.
A Jabsco 11870 Series 1-1/4" pump with an electric clutch which could be belt driven off your main engine will pump 23 GPM (1380 GPH) at 10 feet of head and 1750 RPM.
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Old 09-06-2011, 09:10   #39
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Re: Emergency Pumping

I agree the engine system works well. My pump is in addition to all other pumps on board and is independent of batteries and engine. It is for emergency pumping only and does move alot of water.
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Old 09-06-2011, 09:13   #40
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Re: Emergency Pumping

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I agree the engine system works well. My pump is in addition to all other pumps on board and is independent of batteries and engine. It is for emergency pumping only and does move alot of water.
It will help, and may buy enough time to save her.
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Old 20-06-2011, 07:41   #41
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Re: Emergency Pumping

Hi all i really did not understand the issue and the discussion about electrical or engine driven bilge pumps. If you are in trouble your batteries are flooded and your diesel will not run this is for sure. The best insurance is a independent petrol driven water pump which cost maybe 2-300 usd and will pump 20.000 gallones an hour. I think this is one of the overseen BUT real essential safety gear on board, maybe more important then a life raft........

By the way i have 3 watertight bulkheads in my aluminium boat plus my water tanks in the bilge act as double bottom.....
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Old 20-06-2011, 08:39   #42
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Re: Emergency Pumping

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Hi all i really did not understand the issue and the discussion about electrical or engine driven bilge pumps. If you are in trouble your batteries are flooded and your diesel will not run this is for sure. The best insurance is a independent petrol driven water pump which cost maybe 2-300 usd and will pump 20.000 gallones an hour. I think this is one of the overseen BUT real essential safety gear on board, maybe more important then a life raft........

By the way i have 3 watertight bulkheads in my aluminium boat plus my water tanks in the bilge act as double bottom.....
That sounds good.
But, anything used must be above the water.
Where is the petrol-driven pump and fuel to be stored?
My batteries, like most cats are up high - generator is higher than engines,etc.
They all rely on being above the initial flooding water level, and remaining so during repairs and/or flight-to-safety.
I have 500 gallons of diesel - do not want to take more petrol on board. Would prefer to have no petrol.
But self contained petrol pump on deck would be the best otherwise...
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Old 20-06-2011, 08:50   #43
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Re: Emergency Pumping

hi Allezcat i did not focus on cats, you know i have one of these crazy heavy boats where one leg is missing and which can easily sink because of the lead in my keel. Actually to run a monohull is stupid i know. You are on the save side one hull will allways be swimmming......
My batteries could be flooded and i store my gasoline pump together with my liferaft in my cockpit locker, gives me a good feeling although i will hopefully never use it ( like with any insurance) but i test the pump once a year and could already help one wooden fishing boat in the harbour which started to sink......
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Old 20-06-2011, 09:00   #44
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Re: Emergency Pumping

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hi Allezcat i did not focus on cats, you know i have one of these crazy heavy boats where one leg is missing and which can easily sink because of the lead in my keel. Actually to run a monohull is stupid i know. You are on the save side one hull will allways be swimmming......
My batteries could be flooded and i store my gasoline pump together with my liferaft in my cockpit locker, gives me a good feeling although i will hopefully never use it ( like with any insurance) but i test the pump once a year and could already help one wooden fishing boat in the harbour which started to sink......
Dude I agree with you - best idea in this thread.
I have nothing - today.
Still looking - but I don't want more petrol stuff...
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Old 20-06-2011, 09:20   #45
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Re: Emergency Pumping

Quote:
Originally Posted by CFR View Post
hi Allezcat i did not focus on cats, you know i have one of these crazy heavy boats where one leg is missing and which can easily sink because of the lead in my keel. Actually to run a monohull is stupid i know. You are on the save side one hull will allways be swimmming......
My batteries could be flooded and i store my gasoline pump together with my liferaft in my cockpit locker, gives me a good feeling although i will hopefully never use it ( like with any insurance) but i test the pump once a year and could already help one wooden fishing boat in the harbour which started to sink......
I brought up gas powered pumps as a possibility in the thread I linked. Some problems with them are accessibility, you need it fast. Do you store it with gas in it? Or do you have to fuel it before you use it? How often do you run it to make sure it works? Some of the pumps I saw do 100 gpm. The coast guard drops pumps like these to boats that are sinking. I think I've read at least two stories where these pumps would not start.

For me it's still a toss up between a manually clutched impeller pump on the main engine and a gas powered trash pump that we're talking about here.

They do make them diesel powered, but at an insane price.

John
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