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View Poll Results: What would the best chance of getting away be?
Beat into the wind to put as much distance between you and the coast s possible, while you listen to some cool music and pretend you're a action hero. 89 57.05%
Go paralell to the coastline and try to keep your distance while being beat up by the waves, just because you have a thing for self torture. 11 7.05%
Furl the sails and throw in the sea anchor, haul out the portable DVD-player and crawl back into bed with a cup of hot cocoa and watch "Titanic". 61 39.10%
I'm screwed, I'll inflate the liferaft and jump ship tightly hugging the EPIRB. 2 1.28%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 156. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-06-2009, 00:57   #76
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Some one said the magic word(s) PARACHUTE-ANCHOR. The stituation is dire. A LEE SHORE, howling wind and building sea but no storm lasts forever. Sailing off to windward is NOT an option, you woukld never make enough ground. 120 meters or NYLON warp, a para-anchor, (ground tackle out too!!) a fast dripping tin of oil on the bow (flattens the sea) and hope like hell you can weather the breakers. Best still, AVOID LAND during a storm. Never "run for cover", stay at sea!!!.
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Old 10-06-2009, 17:13   #77
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all bad choices

Great thread, enjoyed reading everybodys input.

I picked #1 as the best of those bad options because 100 miles is nothing in those conditions. I have been in a blow like that with 80 knot gusts and we lost 75 miles in about 15 hours (while heading into the wind). So in the scenario presented a leeshore is the biggest danger. BUT at the same time I cannot imagine having any canvas up either, the seas were so violent it took all my energy just to stay wedged in the well of the nav station (I was bruised head to toe). There was absolutely no way I could of gone forward. We were all inexperienced offshore sailors, so frankly, I don't know how we survived- we made a lot of bad decisions. But the engine held up and the boat was a tank. I quess the old saying the boat can take a lot more than you can applies here. But the boats biggest danger is land.
My two cents,
Erika



Hey crazyhorse, why are you the only member of the singlehand group? are we the only singlehanders on the forum?
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Old 10-06-2009, 22:01   #78
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Old 09-09-2009, 20:17   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
However I would deploy sea anchor on a bridle between bow and stern quarter trying to ensure the boat lay about 50 degrees off the weather.
Depending on the success and degree of rest obtained, I might go back to option 1 although if boat was safe with sea anchor deployed and drifting less than 1 kt downwind, I would probably ride out the storm with the sea anchor.
WHY 50% off WX? The whole idea of a para-anchor is to offer bow to wind (and wave).. path of LEAST resistance (least drift leeward) and a far more comfortable ride! Incidentally, use at leased 120 meters of NYLON rode which acts like a big bungy cord.
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Old 10-09-2009, 03:53   #80
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Well all I can say is that there are other opinions on sea anchors. I am only referring to monos here.

Some monos will sail and tack about it tethered directly off the bow causing uncomfortable motion and stain. Especially in lull when the "bungy" effect causes the boat to move forward and with wind or wave action causing the bow to fall off.

However by holding the bow about 50 degrees off, the boat remains held in the classic hove to position. Note that this requires some sail set (trisail or deep reefed main) and careful adjustment of the tiller. Once hove to and stabilized, drift is minimized and the Von Karman vortices generated by the stalled keel (and hull to some extend) should disturb the wave pattern directly to windward and greatly reduce the extent of breaking crests in the immediate vicinity of the boat.

A side benefit is that if a breaking sea does come aboard, the corners of the cabins and hatched are presented to the sea rather the front flat surfaces.

Note that this arrangement is really using the para-anchor as part of a system to remain hove to rather than just holding the bow to weather.

Normal rider: each boat is different, waves patterns vary and you have to find what works for you.
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Old 10-09-2009, 11:52   #81
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Para-Anchors

An interesting explanation but if that was the case... why not when anchoring or mooring a vessel run a bridle system fore and aft! Unless you have something "driving" the boat forward (a sail up) any mono should ride the waves bow too?
I spent 3 days off Cape Turnagain (aptly named!!) in 20 to 50knt winds and seas as big as a house on a para-anchor and it was as though I was firmly anchored to the bottom! The bow rose and fell with ease and drift was negligible. I 'spose its trial and error, see what suits you but for my money that was the way to go but I also had a lenght of chain over the bow roller and the rode attached to that to prevent chaffing.
My opinion is they are the BEST storm survival device so far.
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Old 10-09-2009, 13:55   #82
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Realistically speaking you have only two options, maintain control of the ship or most likely die. Maintaining control includes option 1 & 3. Option 2 is akin to loosing control as beam to the wind is going to get you a roll-over and you will see what it's like inside a tumbler type washing machine. The ship may survive but the huge amounts of floor boards, panels and locker containers will probably bust you up pretty bad. How many of you have sturdy locks on all your floor boards/access panels and lockers and drawers? Lying "ahull" has worked but normally the boat and crew are severely beaten up. Maintaining control is what it is all about after all the TS type storm you described would be traveling as a reasonable speed and if you can maintain position or minimize miles lost the storm will pass by. I have been there, done that, and got the tee-shirt - and - never want to be in that position again. I will wait weeks, months or even a season to avoid getting out in those conditions.
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Old 10-09-2009, 14:08   #83
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I left marco for key west solo once in a 23' sloop. The weather forecast was 20-25 dropping off to 15-20. About 30 mi out all hell broke loose. There was so much whitewater and spindrift I felt like I was inside a washing machine. It was one crazy night Ill never forget. After trying every sail combination imagineable I found the tillerpilot would hold a course with a storm jib and the motor running. When I arrived at key west the next day I heard the winds were 40 to 50 with higher gusts and 12 boats were sunk with rescue operations underway. Don't tell me the BS about the accuracy of todays weather forecasts making this post implauseable. Its valid. I'd do just as I did and keep trying till I found something that worked.
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Old 10-09-2009, 19:47   #84
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Quote:
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An interesting explanation but if that was the case... why not when anchoring or mooring a vessel run a bridle system fore and aft!.....
Normally I don't anchor or moor in areas of huge breaking waves so anchoring / mooring from the bow is fine. I just want to be anchored, not be hove to .
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I spent 3 days off Cape Turnagain (aptly named!!) in 20 to 50knt winds and seas as big as a house on a para-anchor and it was as though I was firmly anchored to the bottom! The bow rose and fell with ease and drift was negligible. I 'spose its trial and error, see what suits you but for my money that was the way to go...
Yes, sounds like a very good option in that circumstance.

So I can perhaps learn from our experience, are you willing to more fully describe the conditions; like sea state, wind direction (in relationship to the land), wind blown breaking crests or fully overarching breaking crests etc. Did the para-anchor modify the wave shape /action in the immediate vicinity of the anchor or vessel, size of para-anchor, length of rode, size of boat.
Was there a particular reason you initially chose to deploy a para-anchor rather than say heaving to or any other option?

I am not suggesting any system is better, rather wanting to understand the decision making process leading you to try one thing before another.
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Old 11-09-2009, 04:00   #85
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I got bored half way through this. There are very few, if any, cruising sailboats capable of sailing to weather in 60 gusting 80.
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:45   #86
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And probably less sailors (with me being one of them).
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Old 14-09-2009, 18:44   #87
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I got bored half way through this. There are very few, if any, cruising sailboats capable of sailing to weather in 60 gusting 80.
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And probably less sailors (with me being one of them).
No problem for a "real" boat and a "real" sailor
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Old 14-09-2009, 19:33   #88
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We were once hit by a gale of similar proportions in the Gulf of Alaska while sailing from Hawaii to Sitka, Alaska. I elected to deploy a sea anchor. Our drift down wind was approximately 1 knot per hour. If we were 100 miles offshore, I would just be hoping that the conditions didn't last more than 36 hours.

Fair winds and calm seas.
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Old 14-09-2009, 22:08   #89
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[QUOTE=Wotname;330479]
(Was there a particular reason you initially chose to deploy a para-anchor rather than say heaving to or any other option?)

A long days sail before the storm hit, I am a single hander and besides, decided it was EXPERIMENT TIME!! Having never used a para-anchor before I am glad I did as the conditions deteriorated rapidly but the boat did extremely well and NO being bounced around below either, was able to even cook despite the howling wind and breakers.

(For those bored with this or any other discussion there is always the off button...)
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Old 14-09-2009, 22:11   #90
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We were once hit by a gale of similar proportions in the Gulf of Alaska while sailing from Hawaii to Sitka, Alaska. I elected to deploy a sea anchor. Our drift down wind was approximately 1 knot per hour. If we were 100 miles offshore, I would just be hoping that the conditions didn't last more than 36 hours.

Fair winds and calm seas.
That surprises me. I wonder which way the current was going?
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