Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-05-2010, 14:32   #16
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 146
J-36 older but if you could find one should suit you,

Check out a Hobie 33 (monohull fixed or drop keel ) maybe a little too racy.
__________________

__________________
blgklr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 14:35   #17
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
As for storage, I plan on being enough to basically build another boat. lol. I will plan for the worst, so I would like to be able to carry spares. Are the s&s 34's fast? I know they are seaworthy. I know that I won't be able to outrun a lot of storms, but I will be circumnavigating, I won't always be in the southern ocean.
__________________

__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 14:40   #18
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
The hobie 33's look interesting, are they sensitive to weight, would they be able to handle the many thing's I will come across? And to MarkJ, I am at the very beginning of setting this up, so I understand what will be done, but I still am not sure what boats can and will do it, what ones I should avoid, and what ones can do it better then others. And about the J, would you guys consider this? Good price and it seems to be in good condition, of course I would have a survey done, but I would like to know if it's capable. http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1988.../United-States
__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 14:50   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 249
Baba 35, Valiant 32 Pacific Seacraft 34 Southern Cross 32 Contessa 32 Lidgard 32 34. No doubt there are others. You won't be outrunning any storms.
It has all been done before so why bother is what comes to my mind. I would think that the Southern Ocean and capes are dangerous for most boats and pretty uncomfortable in a 32 footer. There are good sea boats amongst them but storage and comfort are limited when you are talking months and self sufficiency.
__________________
chris_gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 14:59   #20
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
Thank you for the suggestions, I especially like the lidgard. Wheter or not I can outrun storms, I would still like performance. So the list of my likes would be : x-34, j/35, and lidgard 32/34. I know there are a lot of designs that I haven't heard of that would do equally as well as these if not better, so if you know of any please tell me.
__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:06   #21
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
I'm sorry for ignoring some of the advice for the s&s 34. On yachtworld a search came up with a tartan s&s 34, is that the same design? After reading about the design, it's now on the list also.
__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:07   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Lakeland, FL
Posts: 1,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernSpeed View Post
How are they storage wise?
J/105s are proven to be very fast for their length even in challenging open ocean conditions. But, they are also light weight boats. So yes, you would have to be careful about much you load them down for a circumnavigation. OTOH, they usually have spartan interiors with lots of room for storage that you can configure pretty much any way you want.
__________________
"There's nothing . . . absolutely nothing . . . half so much worth doing as simply messing around in boats."

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (River Rat to Mole)
slomotion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:14   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 146
That J-35 should be ok and leave you with 150,000 for fitting out,

The Hobie is very light, I think you have to decide if you are capable or willing to do anything with it.

What about a Mini , I think you can get new around 50,000, capable but slower but also designed for solo bluewater.
__________________
blgklr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:23   #24
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
I haven't heard of the mini's, can you direct me to a site or anything? I know I could go light,so I guess I can seriously consider the j/35.
__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:36   #25
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_gee View Post
It has all been done before so why bother is what comes to my mind. I would think that the Southern Ocean and capes are dangerous for most boats and pretty uncomfortable in a 32 footer. .
Chris makes a good point.
A southern oceans circumnavigation will take you about 9 months. So what are you going to do with the boat afterwards? Are you goin to cruise for a few years? Do the South pacific Islands, Brazil in their Olymipc year, etc?

Spending $200,000 on a 9 month project and then selling the boat at a loss as maybe your modifications won't inspire other buyers may be reasonable. However, if you want to cruise for 10 years of which this will be the first 9 months then your boat and route course may be radically different.

One aspect I always think about is getting laid. Whilst a boat arranged for just a single berth may be fine for the Southern Ocean (because no girl will be with you) once you gain the warmer climes you may wish to get out of more than just your long johns. Women folk do like to 'nest', and this may affect the interior design....


Just a thought


Mark
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 15:38   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 146
Mini Transat Open 650

They are 6 and half meters (a little less than 23 feet) designed for solo racing across oceans. Google you will find out more.
__________________
blgklr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 16:31   #27
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 32
This is my personal dream and why I want to do it isn't the question I've asked of you. Just to answer your question, I will bring it back home to Florida when done, live aboard and cruise the many places around here. When I can move up to a boat that I truly like more, then it will be sold. As for getting laid, on a non-stop circumnavigation, I don't imagine picking up to many girls and when I get back it won't be provisioned for such a trip so room will be there. lol. Thank you for the what to search, mini sailboat, mini yacht, and common searches aren't very narrow on the subject. What makes them so seaworthy? Just a question because I don't quite understand.
__________________
SouthernSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 16:50   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: USA
Boat: Cape Dory
Posts: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernSpeed View Post
This is my personal dream and why I want to do it isn't the question I've asked of you. Just to answer your question, I will bring it back home to Florida when done, live aboard and cruise the many places around here. When I can move up to a boat that I truly like more, then it will be sold. As for getting laid, on a non-stop circumnavigation, I don't imagine picking up to many girls and when I get back it won't be provisioned for such a trip so room will be there. lol. Thank you for the what to search, mini sailboat, mini yacht, and common searches aren't very narrow on the subject. What makes them so seaworthy? Just a question because I don't quite understand.
Come on now. You've gotten some very generous responses and you react with . . . "that's not the question I asked". Really? Google "Mini Transat" you'll find plenty of info about that little subset of the sailing world. I think at some point the information which you get cheap is worth . . . not much. Go to Carl's Sail Calculator like I suggested and do some comparision -- that will make you a more active participate in your own quest and you'll learn more as a result.

I'm with Chris and Mark -- why anyone would want to go non-stop solo through the southern ocean at this point is beyond me. Now if you throw in some well chosen stops along the way (the coast of chille!!! -- have you read beth and evan's website among others?) then you're talking. But, personally, I'd stil want something bigger than 33' and Mark makes a hell of a point about the virtues of getting laid along the way.
__________________
Mambo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 17:42   #29
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
Many non-sailors visit here with dreams (or worse, fantasies) of conquering the world by circumnavigating it. We love to encourage anyone to try our special passion, but we must do so with an element of caution. Yes, a cute teenage girl has done it, but it is not something she decided to do a year ago, on a whim. She had been sailing all here life, more than many of us can say, and is no stranger to the dangers of the Southern Ocean. Its like climbing Everest; it takes more than a six-pack and a cool looking axe. It takes knowledge, and the instincts that only come from years of practice.

It appears that you are driven by a goal, but not for the love of sailing.

Fragile, round-the-bouys racers are not, by the way, any more than a knot faster than their more durable relatives. Southern Ocean Storms can move at more than 40 knots, and seemingly come out of nowhere.
__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 17:46   #30
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Contessa 32 - very small but very seaworthy.
HCH 33 - small, easy, better storage.
Ohlson 38 - fast, inexpensive, good storage.
Valiant 40 - lot of storage space and comfort.
etc...

I think there are plenty of good boats for that. Finding a sound one can be a challenge though.

b.
__________________

__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing a Shower in a Smaller Boat Curmudgeon Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 6 22-06-2012 10:49
Boat for Singlehanded World Cruise Sail IC Monohull Sailboats 26 23-02-2010 11:55
In Praise of the Smaller Boat GordMay General Sailing Forum 30 22-01-2007 21:12



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:43.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.