Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 03-11-2008, 16:49   #1
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Question Challenge: Heaving-to with Self-Tacking Jib

A question for owners of boats with self-tacking jibs:

How do you heave-to? The boat just comes about and sails off on a different tack - doesn't it?

If have not tried it, but the charter fleet for which I teach has a few Hanses.

Jack
__________________

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 17:03   #2
Registered User
 
Amgine's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 1,384
Images: 1
options

You'll need to test some of these out, to see what can work.
  • Tether the jib clew to a weather fitting. The fitting must be robust.
  • Roll away the jib, hoist a storm jib with two sheets; heave-to as traditional.
  • Roll away the jib, lift the mainsheet car to weather and sheet in flat, adjust rudder to compensate. (in non-storm conditions, play with sheet/car position to reach equilibrium.)
  • Rig twin jib sheets when needed for heaving-to.
  • Start engine, roll away sails, set auto pilot/windvane to keep it into the wind with the engine just ticking over enough to overcome leeway.
Really, when you think about it, there are a lot of ways to do this. Just takes some time to work through them.
__________________

__________________
Amgine
Blog

On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog anchored in a coral atoll.
Amgine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2008, 17:18   #3
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Thanks for the response. There is one other factor that led to my asking the question. We use a heave-to, sail-to, heave-to method of crew overboard. Time is of the essence.

Any thoughts?

Thanks

Jack
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2008, 19:55   #4
Registered User
 
Amgine's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 1,384
Images: 1
Heave-to, sail-to, heave-to with self-tacking jib

Okay, this is completely opinion with no basis in experience, but the best routine would be to use the quick stop (point directly into the wind until all way is lost, possibly until sternway is gained), during which the tether can be retrieved ready for application. Sail-to the COB/position where heave-to will allow the boat to drift to the COB. Heave-to using the tether.

Same situation, alternative resolution: Quick stop as before, retrieving extra sheet (Genoa? Spinaker?). Sail-to, then heave-to using extra sheet.

Final suggestion, probably won't work if the wind is up, roll away the jib. Slack sheet to nearly broad-off, tiller hard to leeward; the boat should fill and gill very slowly by itself. Rig two sheets for jib, unroll and sail-to. Heave-to using two sheets.

The first two may be quick enough if the gear is ready to hand. The last would likely be the slowest method/most number of steps.

Another thing you should do is contact Hanse yachts. They may have a specifc technique they've developed.
__________________
Amgine
Blog

On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog anchored in a coral atoll.
Amgine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2008, 18:19   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
I was taught the figure 8 for MOB. No heaving to or jibing required, although heaving to would help if you overshoot on the last upwind approach. Is the heave-to, sail-to, heave-to method better?
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2008, 21:04   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I was taught the figure 8 for MOB. No heaving to or jibing required, although heaving to would help if you overshoot on the last upwind approach. Is the heave-to, sail-to, heave-to method better?
There are some distinct advantages:

- It can be done by one person easily.
- You never lose sight of the MOB
- You end up hove-to, with MOB on leeward - easier to pick up.
- No flapping sails and flying clews.
- The jibing is done in a controlled fashion with sails sheeted in. In big winds you can chicken jibe. (Been there, done that.)
- Overshooting is seldom an problem.

While discussing this approach in instructor's clinic I was conducting, we realized that self-tacking jibs presented a problem. My solution was a figure eight, but I promised that I would seek the advise of others.

Jack
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2008, 21:52   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
The quickstop, heave to is designed to keep the casualty in sight; too many times in the past the victim has been lost during the figure eight. With a self tacking jib, the best bet will be to keep the jig sheeted tight, make the approach with the wind more abeam and luff the main. Fan the rudder to slow down more. The wind will not flow properly over the jib and hopefully will not have much fwd thrust. Then sheet in the main just enough to keep the bow from blowing down. Practice, practice, practice!
__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 07:45   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandy daugherty View Post
With a self tacking jib, the best bet will be to keep the jig sheeted tight, make the approach with the wind more abeam and luff the main.
The self-tacking jib will simply tack and the boat will continue to sail, ratgher than heaving-to.

Jack
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 10:33   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
Too bad. SOL?
__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 10:45   #10
Registered User
 
svHyLyte's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tampa Bay area, USA
Boat: Beneteau First 42
Posts: 3,434
Images: 25
If it were me I'd head up immediately, cast off the jib sheet, hard sheet the main, furl the jib and proceed with a recovery bald headed. You won't stop quite so quickly but you will stop in short order. Most yachts will lay too with a hard sheeted main only and with the relatively small roll of a non-overlapping sail on the head-stay, a weather-cocked rudder should hold you steady enough for a recovery.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the Sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
svHyLyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 13:28   #11
Registered User
 
Viking Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: Fantasia 35 - s/v Feeling Good
Posts: 1,074
You could also take jib sheets from the jib clew (or boom end) and secure them with jam cleats (or release knots) near the jib tack. The sheets would then go to sheet blocks located well forward and then secured near the cockpit. The jib sheets will not hinder the normal operation of the self-tacking jib. Pulling on the a jib sheet will release it from the jam cleat (or knot) and allow the jib to be set to windward. The disadvantage is having extra lines on deck.
__________________
Viking Sailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 13:43   #12
Registered User
 
theonecalledtom's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Socal
Boat: Beneteau 36.7
Posts: 386
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
There are some distinct advantages:

- You end up hove-to, with MOB on leeward - easier to pick up.

Jack
I read something recently that suggested testing this in strong winds in *your* boat to get a feel for how fast you will drift to leeward - too fast and you will be pushing the MOB hard.

On the original topic we have a self tending staysail, which is going to be a likely choice for heaving to if we haven't got the storm jib out. Was figuring on leading a sheet back to the genoa blocks to achieve this. Not familiar with Hanse but do they not have blocks for spinnakers that could be used?
__________________
theonecalledtom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2008, 15:09   #13
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by theonecalledtom View Post
I read something recently that suggested testing this in strong winds in *your* boat to get a feel for how fast you will drift to leeward - too fast and you will be pushing the MOB hard.

On the original topic we have a self tending staysail, which is going to be a likely choice for heaving to if we haven't got the storm jib out. Was figuring on leading a sheet back to the genoa blocks to achieve this. Not familiar with Hanse but do they not have blocks for spinnakers that could be used?
The sheet led aft should do the trick.

In my experience the motion of the boat pushing water tends to keep the MOB away from the hull. While trying to "rescue" a TV antennae that came off near Cape Scott, that was the issue - it keep getting pushed away from the boat. Parenthetically, I did learn that the MOD needs to something (like a PFD) onto which we can grip or snag with a boat hook.

Any MOB drill needs practice.


Jack
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2008, 14:11   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 12
Re: OP's question, I'm sure it depends on the boat. In the Freedom 20's with self-tacking jibs that we use locally, the windage is enough to make the bow fall off and keep the boat hove-to.
__________________
Pete R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2008, 14:54   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
I think you are screwed with a self tacking jib, the boat is going to want to drive. Maybe try blowing the jib sheet and backing the main but it won't be easy for the new sailor. The art of sailing backwards is not often taught. Only racers clearing foils prior to a start seem to use the technique.
__________________

__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heaving-to mario f Seamanship & Boat Handling 21 14-04-2010 06:46
Tacking a Cutter chkrhntr1945 General Sailing Forum 14 26-04-2009 09:41
heaving to vs lying ahull bonnelaine Seamanship & Boat Handling 14 02-11-2008 07:21
self tacking jib west coaster Monohull Sailboats 13 15-05-2008 07:30
Heaving Fro? dghall General Sailing Forum 35 01-05-2007 23:13



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:23.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.