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Old 20-08-2011, 02:47   #16
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

From my humble point of view it's a matter of assessing the risks.
1. There's a lot less to bump into. So it's safer.
2. There's nowhere to bolt to if the weather worsens. But I've been caught near shore and should have gone out of sight of land instead of beaching my Cat.
3. You might not come back. Either it's you're own fault (so take the consequences), or someone else's (which can happen anywhere), or nature is doing what nature does (it's not personal).
4. Your electronics fail and you have to learn to shot the midday sun. Don't forget the basic equipment, you'll have plenty of time to learn DR and Sextant if you've got, and are made, of the right stuff.
5. It's your boat that's more likely to kill you.
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Old 20-08-2011, 03:40   #17
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pirate Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Thats the 'Catch 22' of sailing... you never know... until you do it...
You just go when you 'Feel Ready'...
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Old 21-08-2011, 17:12   #18
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My 2 pennies you will know when your ready and in a lot s cases people fail long before the boat unless it's a total piece Confidece in your boat is like respect it is earned take it out in less than favorable conditions and make it prove it's self it truly amazing what a boat can take. Boats feel no pain not like a person You could be out on a flat calm day trip and fall brake your arm and now your useless and it's more likely to happen close to shore because there Is a false sence of security to think well the coasties will be along shortly to rescue me one tends to me far more cautious offshore where you know your on your own
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Old 21-08-2011, 17:53   #19
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

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Originally Posted by Wavewacker View Post
So, how does one know that he or she is ready to sail off the horizon alone or with someone who is less of a sailor?
You can't know until you do it. Even if you have made several offshore passages with and experienced skipper and have a ton of experience as second banana, you won't know until you try if you can do it yourself. You may be wracked by analytic indecision, you may find you don't like being in charge in this particular situation, you may panic at things.

That said, most people are unsure when they set off for the first time and almost all of them survive. All of them make mistakes and continue to make mistakes, and yet most of them survive.

I feel it speaks well of your judgement that you asked this question.


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Originally Posted by Wavewacker View Post
And how do they know the boat can make the journey?
Once again you can't know for any particular boat, but in this case you can load the deck some. If the model boat you have has been offshore several times, or better, round the world, that is indicative. Try to find out what the folks that took that model offshore did for upgrades, use your judgement about which ones are really worthwhile and economical then go for it.
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Old 21-08-2011, 18:26   #20
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

"When you can snatch the pebbles from my hand, Grasshopper, then it will be time for you to go."
As a courtesy to those whom you expect to come out in any condition to save you, do get some good judgment - which generally comes from experience, which generally comes from bad judgment...

Michael
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Old 25-08-2011, 05:43   #21
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Interesting thread,

I am about to do exactly this,

Fiji to Australia, on my own if my friend decides she is not up to it.

She is terrified off the ocean, We will circumvent Fiji first. One, To make sure I know the boat well enough to make the trip, and can manage it on my own,

second, to see if she is up to making the trip with me, If not, she will fly home,

One poster mentions V8 motor cycle, I ride a Honda Blackbird,1100XX.
I snow ski, Upper intermediate, Sail a 14 foot Paper Tiger, Love cartwheeling it,
Can Water ski.
Been driving Motor boats, Ski boats, fishing boats, Most of my life,

Never been to open sea like this time, I have just had a full licenced survey and haul out done, Waiting on the report at the moment,

If the boat is safe and seaworthy, I will buy it and learn to sail it properly by going around Fiji.
I have seen a video of this boat in severe weather, It can make it, then so can I,

When I am comfortable with my ability, I will the sail it to Australia, 3000 miles, straight across to probably Brisbane, Then down the coast to Melbourne, My home port.

Am I ready, I dont know, But I am about to find out, I have enough aquired knowledge to stand me in good stead,

I went skiing in Japan, got lost in a snow storm at night walking home from the town, I walked across a flat area to get to another road, I fell into a creek, 4 metres below the surface, I was only lightly dressed, no gloves, only runners on, jeans, -30C powder snow, You cant pack powder snow to make steps. Suppressing panic, knowing I had about 20 minutes max to get my self out, or freeze to death. I slowly worked my way up and out of the hole, The snow stuck to my hands like a glove, and I could feel the heat draining from my body, Scared the crap out of me,

But I over came the sheer panic of knowing that I would be dead, So I know I can pull through in a crisis, self preservation kicks in, think calmly, do what you have to do,
small sails in bad weather, if all else fails, throw the drogue over and sit on it, on a long lead, till the storm passes,

All advice welcome,
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Old 25-08-2011, 09:01   #22
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

i k now someone has said this--isnt the boat but the hands on board that make the journey.
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Old 13-09-2011, 07:43   #23
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

What type boat do you have?
How long have you had the boat?
What training have you had?
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Old 13-09-2011, 08:31   #24
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Ok. To add to this question. I have seen some sailing schools that offer a 13 or 14 week course to get your RYA/MCA Yachtmaster Ocean qualifications. They all that NO sailing experience is required. Does this mean that theoretically a person could move to the coast, do the course and that they are then qualified and WILL HAVE THE SKILLS REQUIRED (very important I believe) to jump on a yacht and sail the into the big blue yonder? Is this a realistic expectation?
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Old 13-09-2011, 08:44   #25
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Any Newbie will require a decent level of competence in engineering, yard work, electrical wiring, lifting and slinging, diesel engine troubleshooting and at least some competence as a dietician. Some aerodynamics understanding to be able to make from scratch, and operate, model aircraft will help with understanding sail performance. Schoolboy mathematics will suffice for most applications with a sound understanding of geometry. Very few can work a sextant but it's wise to carry a plastic version, plus the book to work it.
There are electronic ways of achieving these things but salt water and electronics make poor companions. Useful, but not reliable.
The easiest thing to do on the oceans is to get lost. It's a gamble then. Even in sight of land it's remarkably easy. The Coastal Skipper course will teach you all you need to know about Navigation except for Greater Circle tracking. Holding a compass course will do for a few hundred miles so long as you can hold that course for duration of the trip, and you can recognise the coast when it comes into view.
The other way is to do it properly, short coastal trips, learning the boat. Long coastal trips in varying weather, learning your limitations. Night trips, learning a whole new set of problems from Lobster pot markers to night lights. Then all you've got to add is Weather Forecasting, engine rebuilding, jury rigging, and boat selection.
Bit's of Paper don't float very well!
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Old 16-09-2011, 23:32   #26
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

l tried sailing with my uncle who also has little experience last summer but our boat was satisfied too dangerous for the adventure by an engineer. That saved us it’s very bad to try what you don’t know.
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Old 10-10-2011, 05:28   #27
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

On a medium rough day, sail offshore outside the traffic in your area, set the windvane, and go to sleep. If you can sleep for fours hours then you are most likely ready. This test shows your ability in the two most important aspects of solo sailing. If you can sail of course. But an aspect most don't think about and the main killer of solo sailors: Can you sleep while alone at sea? Sleep deprivation will cause shipwrecks. I've seen solo sailors give the game up for lack of sleep second only to lack of money.
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:14   #28
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Quote:
Originally Posted by svcambria View Post
"----do get some good judgment - which generally comes from experience, which generally comes from bad judgment...

Michael
In the words of the late Gamble Rogers - "Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted".
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Old 12-10-2011, 20:31   #29
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

When your ready you will go for it, training and sailing alot will help with confidence and experience, and when you know you can do it go for it, until you have the confidence in yourself no amount of practice or training will change that inner feeling of asking when your ready.
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Old 15-12-2011, 16:26   #30
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Re: Challenge: Going to Sea - Your First Time Alone

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleven View Post
Any Newbie will require a decent level of competence in engineering, yard work, electrical wiring, lifting and slinging, diesel engine troubleshooting and at least some competence as a dietician. Understanding sail performance. Schoolboy mathematics will suffice for most applications with a sound understanding of geometry.
There are electronic ways of achieving these things but salt water and electronics make poor companions. Useful, but not reliable.
The easiest thing to do on the oceans is to get lost. It's a gamble then. Even in sight of land it's remarkably easy. The Coastal Skipper course will teach you all you need to know about Navigation. Holding a compass course will do for a few hundred miles so long as you can hold that course for duration of the trip, and you can recognise the coast when it comes into view.
The other way is to do it properly, short coastal trips, learning the boat. Long coastal trips in varying weather, learning your limitations. Night trips, learning a whole new set of problems from Lobster pot markers to night lights. Then all you've got to add is Weather Forecasting, engine rebuilding, jury rigging, and boat selection.
Bit's of Paper don't float very well!
Eleven, I took some liberties with your quote, just to point out some of your valuable lessons. Sir you are right on, If a sailor can't conceive of a number of solutions to any problem, then he may not be prepared.
Capt.Fred
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