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Old 31-07-2015, 12:57   #16
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by ka4wja View Post
I confess, I've been using the same pair of linesman pliers for almost 40 years....still cuts (and strips, if you know how to use 'em) copper wire like they were new....and I've used 'em for decades with Scotchloks....
Yes....there are 3M tools for them....but, I've never used them...just used my pliers...

As for the "goop"...yep, it's dielectric grease / silicone...

Gotta' go..

fair winds..

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Old 31-07-2015, 13:34   #17
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by PamlicoTraveler View Post
I am replacing a radio and this is how the old radio wires were spliced. This looks like a great way to connect small wires, instead of having to use butt connectors. What are they called and where do I find them?

Some years ago a telephone wireman left a box of 500 of these in my house and I've been using them on my boat ever since. Great for instrument wiring as they strip and seal.
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Old 31-07-2015, 18:45   #18
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

One of those nice little items god gave us to make things easy, thank you sir.
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Old 01-08-2015, 11:27   #19
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by adlib2 View Post
Some years ago a telephone wireman left a box of 500 of these in my house and I've been using them on my boat ever since. Great for instrument wiring as they strip and seal.
I was thinking the same thing. Those look like what the telephone company used or may still.
They have ways of encapsulating spices better than anyone.
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Old 05-08-2015, 10:50   #20
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

I disagree with the notion that the connectors shown in the initial image in this thread are designed for use with stranded conductors, and apparently their manufacturer does too.

From 3M description of the 3M Scotchlok IDC Butt Connector UY, UY2 or UR, which is what I believe is shown in the initial image in this thread:

Quote:
..ports accept two solid copper conductors that can be of different wire gauges.
Cf.: Product Catalog*3Mā„¢ Scotchlokā„¢ IDC Butt Connector UY2Ā*: Electrical Commercial and Industrial: 3M US

The product data sheet, which is mentioned by other respondents as a source of information suggesting stranded wires could be used, actually does not mention this. It says:

Quote:
The Scotchlok UY Connector is a butt-type, moisture resistant connector accepting two solid copper wires in the range of 22-26 AWG...with a maximum insulation O.D. of 0.060-inch....
The connector was designed to be used with solid copper telephone wiring which has rather thin insulation, which is appropriate for the low voltages involved in telephony.

The specifications also denote very clearly:

Quote:
APPLICATION:

Acceptable Conductors --SOLID COPPER ONLY
I don't know where some respondents in this discussion developed the notion that the ScotchLok UY Connector was intended to be used on stranded wire conductors, but that notion is not supported by the manufacturer in the manufacturer's literature.

Cf.: http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/2...-connector.pdf

The approved crimp tool is a ScotchLok Brand E-9C or similar. Using the approved tool greatly facilitates crimping of the connector. I suppose if you only crimp one connector a month you could use almost any pliers.

Note that connectors in this series with the RED caps are designed for crimping three conductors; connectors with AMBER caps are for two conductors.

The UY series is designed to be moisture resistant. I am sure there are telephone circuits still working today that pass through 3M UY connectors that were installed 40-years ago.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:03   #21
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

Correct the UY is rated for solid. And the connector shown most likely is only rated for solid thou they are common on the European boats I have worked on. But 3M does offer IDC connectors for stranded such as the 314. As I mentioned you need to check the specs for your application.
http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1...nector-314.pdf
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:12   #22
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

They come in different sizes and you can get them for connecting 2 or 3 wires together. For instance, UY-3 are the yellow, smaller 3-strand connectors. They can be used on stranded wire because you don't strip the wire to expose the copper. If you pull the cap off (or find one that has fallen off), you'll see it has a V-notch that pierces the insulation. So essentially, it wraps itself around the sides of the stranded wire.

Of course, this is different than the piercing points (made for stranded wire only) you see in ethernet connectors and is why I don't recommend you put ends on ethernet cables at all. Better to use a tool-less jack and patch cable.
Before IT, I worked telephone I&R.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:16   #23
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by Colin A View Post
Correct the UY is rated for solid. And the connector shown most likely is only rated for solid thou they are common on the European boats I have worked on. But 3M does offer IDC connectors for stranded such as the 314. As I mentioned you need to check the specs for your application.
http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1...nector-314.pdf
There is no dispute that 3M does make insulation displacement connectors for stranded wire, but they are not the ones shown in the first article in this thread.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:59   #24
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

Also called "button" connectors because of the "button" you push to lock them down. Used to be Telco equipment only, and yes, the goo is dielectric grease. They are typically color coded (the button color) to indicate which size wire they are for, i.e. 22-24-26 AWG not SAE sizes.


If you use the wrong size, you may or may not penetrate the insulation or actually cut into the wire, leading to failure. 3M has used the "Scotchlok" name for a number of different splicing products, not just this kind.


You'll find them available to join 2, 3, 4, even 6 wires in one "button".
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Old 05-08-2015, 14:25   #25
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Also called "button" connectors because of the "button" you push to lock them down. Used to be Telco equipment only, and yes, the goo is dielectric grease. They are typically color coded (the button color) to indicate which size wire they are for, i.e. 22-24-26 AWG not SAE sizes.


If you use the wrong size, you may or may not penetrate the insulation or actually cut into the wire, leading to failure. 3M has used the "Scotchlok" name for a number of different splicing products, not just this kind.


You'll find them available to join 2, 3, 4, even 6 wires in one "button".
Are they not something the telephone companies used mostly 22AWG?
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Old 05-08-2015, 14:42   #26
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

My ex-Western Electric friend gave me a great deal of 24AWG wire that they used as "premises wire" inside of buildings, but a lot of online sources list it as "22 or 24 AWG" these days.


Whatever the button package says, the safest bet is to match it. Probably says "22 to 24".(G)
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Old 05-08-2015, 14:54   #27
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Re: What kind of connectors are these?

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Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
My ex-Western Electric friend gave me a great deal of 24AWG wire that they used as "premises wire" inside of buildings, but a lot of online sources list it as "22 or 24 AWG" these days.


Whatever the button package says, the safest bet is to match it. Probably says "22 to 24".(G)
I believe I got some form the same source. The Bell System used some good things on wire connections. I think today it's fiber optics.
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