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Old 09-07-2015, 10:36   #16
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

https://flir.app.box.com/s/437qeua23.../12099656892/1
If you RTFM they have a nice explanation with diagrams and everything.

I have a GX2150 connected to a e127. I checked the manual it looks like the same setup as mine. I got this info from a Raymarine tech.

c/e-Series MFD Power/Data Cable Matrix AIS GX2150
white NMEA OUT+ (gray)
green NMEA Common (green)
yellow NMEA IN+ (blue)
brown NMEA Common (green)
orange/white NMEA HS OUT+ (brown)
orange/green NMEA Common (green)

As for seatalk, there's basically two different kinds. Seatalk and SeatalkNG are power + serial, SeatalkHS is basically IP networks with waterproof cables and switches (ie: you can use a regular network switch and regular network cables and splice on the proprietary connections as needed.
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Old 02-08-2015, 13:31   #17
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

So. Finally on the boat and happily anchored in Smuggler Cove so I thought it was time to run wire and see what was what.

The nmea output from the Raymarine e80 is wired to the st7001 autopilot. The Standard horizon Gx matrix 2150 is apparently wired to an old handheld Garmin gpsmap 76. Which is pretty useless.

I found a wiring diagram from standard horizon that indicates I can wire the e80 directly to the vhf using nmea.

So... Can I 'split' the existing connection to the autopilot? Do I need a terminal strip or can I just crimp connect them? Or do I need some sort of hub like this multiplexor thing I have been reading about.

This whole thing has been a great comedy filled with security hexes and running wire without fish tape. I sure hope it's as easy as crimping some wires but somehow I doubt it. :-)
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Old 03-08-2015, 15:39   #18
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

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Originally Posted by Macblaze View Post
...The nmea output from the Raymarine e80 is wired to the st7001 autopilot. The Standard horizon Gx matrix 2150 is apparently wired to an old handheld Garmin gpsmap 76...

I found a wiring diagram from standard horizon that indicates I can wire the e80 directly to the vhf using nmea.

So... Can I 'split' the existing connection to the autopilot? Do I need a terminal strip or can I just crimp connect them? Or do I need some sort of hub like this multiplexor thing I have been reading about. ...
You can't do it without a multiplexer. The autopilot can't handle 38,400 bps over its NMEA port, so you can't just tap in the VHF... But you can rewire the autopilot to use just SeaTalk, freeing up your E80 chartplotter's NMEA port for use with the VHF.

I assume your GPS receiver is an older Raymarine unit, like the RayStar 120, connected via SeaTalk and not NMEA0183?
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Old 03-08-2015, 15:40   #19
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

No, you can't just split them. The classic method would have been to use an NMEA 0183 multiplexer. However, I would recommend seeing if you can use an NMEA 0183 to NMEA 2000 adapter on the instrument and then connect the Autopilot to the E 80's NMEA 2000 input. It's much cheaper.

Raymarine makes a "SeaTalk to SeaTalkNG" adapter that does most of that work and is pretty cheap. I used it to connect a SeaTalk autopilot remote to my NMEA2000 only Garmin head unit (wasn't even a RayMarine network. The adapter will definitely work with autopilots, so I'd do it with that and put your other device on the NMEA 0183 port.

To clarify the Raymarine thing:

SeaTalk: NMEA 0183 serial (RS-422) with collision avoidance so it can be sort of put on a bus.
SeaTalkNG: NMEA 2000 CAN bus (not serial) with proprietary connectors.
SeaTalkHS: Ethernet with proprietary marine-grade connectors.

There's a pattern here with RayMarine: They take standards and tweak them just enough to make them proprietary and try to convince people that they need an all RayMarine system or it will be complicated, when in fact all you need to do is re-connectorize them to match the standard. They sell adapters as well.
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Old 03-08-2015, 17:47   #20
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

I doubt an E80 has seatalk NG?...


I would rewire the autopilot with seatalk and free up the nmea183 port for AIS.


no parts needed.


as above I'm curious how his 120/125 gps is wired in. if seatalk or nmea
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Old 03-08-2015, 17:58   #21
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

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I doubt an E80 has seatalk NG?...

It does. They refer to it as "SeaTalk2" and clarify in the manual that it is a proprietary extension of NMEA2000. The SeaTalkNG trade name came later, but the port is the same.

But wiring the autopilot to the SeaTalk port is a better idea.


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Old 03-08-2015, 20:07   #22
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

NMEA 0183 is not a buss protocol, it's a point to point protocol. You can attach several receive ports to one transmit port without a problem, you cannot attach multiple transmit ports to s single receive port without a multiplexer. The exact number of receive ports that can be attached to one transmit port is hardware dependent and depends on the signal strength from the transmit port. NMEA 2000 on the other hand is a buss protocol. Seatalk 1 is a daisy chain where what is received on one input port is re-transmitted on the output port and passed along to the next instrument which does the same thing unless it's the last instrument in the chain. The Matrix 2150 does not have a GPS built in, you have to buy a 2200 to get the GPS built in. I recommend that the Seatalk 1 instruments be connected via a seatalk 1 daisy chain. There is no reason to introduce SeatalkNG in the absence of any seatalk NG instruments. I just installed a new SeatalkNG set of instruments and the new buss design is very nice, but really does not solve any problems for seatalk 1 instruments and adds no functionality. All the converter does is become the new end of your daisy chain instead of the chart plotter. Then you have to buy a seatalk NG cable to connect it to the chart plotter. So you've now added a converter and cable for no reason at all. I connected my Matrix 2200 to the chart plotter to the 2nd nmea output port on the 2200 and set it for 38400 baud. I connected the chart plotter transmit port to the 1st input port of the 2200 and to the NMEA input port on my matrix 3000 set at 4800 baud. Everything is extremely happy with two receive ports connected to one transmit port. If I remember correctly the maximum recommended number of receive ports on one transmit port from my hardware is four, but this somewhat depends on cable length and total signal loss. I connected the NMEA output port on the 3000 to the input side of the number 1 NMEA port on the chart plotter to receive DSC messages from the vhf also at 4800 baud. Note that my chart plotter has two NMEA 0183 ports (not all of them do) and the speed the port is set at is the same for transmit and receive on that port. On my chart plotter port 1 is set to 4800 and port 2 is set to 38400. I simply don't think the the E80 is going to have enough NMEA 0183 ports to make all of this stuff deliver full functionality using the NMEA 0183 protocol. Using the seatalk 1 system already built into the instruments and the chart plotter will eliminate the need for multiplexers (not cheap) and lots of complicated wiring plans.
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Old 08-08-2015, 17:12   #23
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

Thanks all. Currently enjoying the rainy Broughtons. I will give it a try as soon as we find ourselves stationary for a while.
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Old 09-08-2015, 19:05   #24
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

Additional thoughts. Because of this discussion I have spent hours on my E80 and AIS. I have only an AIS receiver. I first made sure I had full 12.5 voltage. Second, on the E-80 system set up, under system integration, I brought the baud rate up to 38,400. After a few seconds, I had plenty of ships setting off danger alarms. Next I set the range to only ships within 0.2 nm. that cut out a lot of far away ships. I only set alarm on when sailing at dusk or night.
Second, I really like iPAD Marine Traffic. Have used it all of the Chesapeake, thru the canal to Delaware and along NJ coast and long island to Block Island. At night, I have AIS on my E-80 and on marine traffic.
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Old 12-08-2015, 07:53   #25
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

some odds: I have an E120, about the same as the E80, it has an STng connection, but the AIS will NOT work with it (some years go I found the original dealers advice for that), so AIS must be connected through NMEA38400. Software setting in the E120. But this takes the only NMEA0183 away, but anyway, the E80 will be connected to the Autopilot through Seatalk1 (ST1). I guess I know why you have a separate GPS for the VHF, Standard Horizon, at least my one is very choosy on the input NMEA-sentence, I am routing through a shipmodul multiplexer ST1 in and NMEA0183 out, the AIS500 output for the VHF does not provide the requested sentence. Be careful having more than one GPS on your system, my course line on openCPN looked like a sawblade, the AIS has its own GPS, the course computer of the autopilot too, the E120 will somehow surpress the unneeded one, but openCPN showed them both. After 5 years running with this Raymess I am switching to B&G now, the E120, repaired twice already, likes to reboot and it is not the voltage! B&G because of their 4G radar. Basically your E80 is an old Linux computer... at least the e120 is
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:02   #26
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

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Originally Posted by blubaju View Post
some odds: I have an E120, about the same as the E80, it has an STng connection, but the AIS will NOT work with it (some years go I found the original dealers advice for that), so AIS must be connected through NMEA38400. Software setting in the E120. But this takes the only NMEA0183 away, but anyway, the E80 will be connected to the Autopilot through Seatalk1 (ST1). I guess I know why you have a separate GPS for the VHF, Standard Horizon, at least my one is very choosy on the input NMEA-sentence, I am routing through a shipmodul multiplexer ST1 in and NMEA0183 out, the AIS500 output for the VHF does not provide the requested sentence. Be careful having more than one GPS on your system, my course line on openCPN looked like a sawblade, the AIS has its own GPS, the course computer of the autopilot too, the E120 will somehow surpress the unneeded one, but openCPN showed them both. After 5 years running with this Raymess I am switching to B&G now, the E120, repaired twice already, likes to reboot and it is not the voltage! B&G because of their 4G radar. Basically your E80 is an old Linux computer... at least the e120 is
There is not such thing as NMEA38400...

NMEA0183 is the protocol and 4800, 9600, 38400 are all baud rates (speed) that NMEA0183 can communicate over.

The problem is AIS requires the fastest communication rate (38400) due to the high amount of data. Unfortunatly an NMEA0183 port (essentially a serial port) can only speak one speed. So if you set the speed to 38400, then many older devices will no longer function.
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:27   #27
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

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There is not such thing as NMEA38400...

NMEA0183 is the protocol and 4800, 9600, 38400 are all baud rates (speed) that NMEA0183 can communicate over.
...
Yes, you are certainly right, sorry I should have written NMEA0183 set to 38400 baud, but I apologize, I did not think anything about this, automatically assuming people reading this thread will know it anyway as we do when talking with friends, we only take short cuts, again, thank you for the correction.
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Old 14-09-2015, 17:45   #28
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

By no means a NEMA or Seatalk expert, but I have connected my A75 MFD, EV100 auto pilot to my existing Lowrance MFD, and Fruno NEMA sailing instruments. I am now in the process of connecting my engine instruments to the seatalk backbone via a RS11 interface (NoLand Engineering). Here is the partial hook up diagram. So far everything talks nice and friendly like. When finished I will have complete control at the helm with remote viewing at the nav station. Including GPS/Course/Speed/Depth/heading/Wind(spd&Direction)/ Engine hours/tachometer/oil pressure/Temp/alternator voltage. I used to work on large oil tankers Radar/Navigation equipment. I will have more info at my MFD's than the Exxon Valdez had. Next year I will update my radar to interface with all of this. (Cost so far is <$1500 in upgrading what I had)
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Old 16-10-2015, 08:49   #29
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

The Raymarine E80 & E120 does have an ST2 port which was Raymarine's first attempt at an NMEA2000 data bus and may connected to a SeatalkNG data bus. However the last release of software did not include the decoding of the NMEA2000 messages received by the AIS. So users of these older style MFDs must connect their AIS units via NMEA0183 at 38400 baud to decode the messages.
Hope this explanation helps😀


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Old 16-10-2015, 09:09   #30
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Re: Raymarine and NMEA for Dummies

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The Raymarine E80 & E120 does have an ST2 port which was Raymarine's first attempt at an NMEA2000 data bus and may connected to a SeatalkNG data bus. However the last release of software did not include the decoding of the NMEA2000 messages received by the AIS. So users of these older style MFDs must connect their AIS units via NMEA0183 at 38400 baud to decode the messages.
Hope this explanation helps😀


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I tried to connect my MFD to a NMEA2000 bus via the ST2 port. CONSTANT REBOOTS... Just sayin!
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