Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-05-2015, 20:28   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Boat: Farr 11.6
Posts: 10
Question ICom m801e to Pactor PTC-IIusb cable pin diagrams

Hi Guys

I'm in a rush to set up a PTC-IIusb modem with our m801e radio and was wondering if anyone could provide me with the correct cable pin diagrams for the remote and acc cables. I have found information on the m802 but there's nothing for the m801e that I can see.

Any help much appreciated

Thanks
Johol
__________________

__________________
johol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 16:10   #2
Registered User
 
ka4wja's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Florida
Boat: Catalina 470
Posts: 2,033
Re: ICom m801e to Pactor PTC-IIusb cable pin diagrams

Johol,
I understand being in a rush, but probably not a good idea....
(especially with this set-up, as you'll need to either make-up some cables or source some pre-made cables...)

The M-801e is not a common animal for use with a PACTOR modem, and while it WILL work, there are some differences...
In any case, I do have the info for you...

Quote:
Originally Posted by johol View Post
I'm in a rush to set up a PTC-IIusb modem with our m801e radio and was wondering if anyone could provide me with the correct cable pin diagrams for the remote and acc cables. I have found information on the m802 but there's nothing for the m801e that I can see.

Any help much appreciated

Thanks
Johol

You will use the M-801e's "AF/MOD" 9-pin "D" connector and "Remote" connector....(and you're likely going to need to use the "REMOTE" connector for GPS NMEA input as well)


I'm not sure where you are located....but...
You CAN buy pre-made cables for the M-801e.....wondering if your Icom dealer is out-of-stock???



1) For the "AF/MOD" connection:
In the initial Set Mode menus, make sure you have selected "AF/MOD" in the Remote Mod menu...
And selected ON, in the ACC out menu...
(The following info is from Sailmail's site...with my adding the M-801e's 9-pin "D" connector info in red...)

The SCS modems use an 8-pin DIN connector for HF audio connections, although all of the useful signals are on pins 1 to 5 so a 5-pin DIN connector will work just fine. In fact, the German pin layout for an 8-pin connector does not match the geometry of the American pin layout, so if you melted the original connector trying to solder it then a 5-pin connector is the easiest replacement. The 5-pin connectors from Radio Shack also don’t melt as easily as the German ones. A good trick is to also buy a female connector, and plug the male connector into the female connector to hold the pins straight while you are soldering it. The pin numbering for DIN connectors is inconsistent, so check the PTC-II manual carefully for the pin locations.
Many marine electronics dealers sell pre-assembled cables for many common radios (e.g. Icoms). If you are using an Icom M710, M700pro, M710RT, or M802, just buy a pre-assembled cable.

PTC-II
"DIN" pins
Pin 1 Transmit audio (TxD) from the HF modem to the transmitter
Connect to "MOD+", Pin 1 of the AF/MOD "D" connector.
Pin 2 Ground (audio signal return)
Connect to "MOD-", Pin 2 of the AF/MOD "D" connector, and connect to "AF-", Pin 4 of the AF/MOD "D" connector.
Pin 3 Push-to-Talk (PTT), connect to ground to transmit
Connect to "SEND", Pin 5 of the AF/MOD "D" connector.
Pin 4 Receive audio (RxD) from the receiver to the HF modem
Connect to "AF+, Pin 3 of the AF/MOD "D" connector.

Pin 5 Power supply input to PTC-II (alternative to pin jack)
If you desire to power the PTC-II from the M-801e directly, connect to "13.6V", Pin 7 of the AF/MOD "D" connector. (and you must select "On" in the ACC out menu...)
shell cable shield
Connect to GND, Pin 9 of the AF/MOD "D" connector.


Note that these pin-out connections are only slightly different than those on the M-802's AF/MOD connector, pins 3, 4, 5, and 6....so you could buy a premade 8-pin DIN to 9-pin "D" connector cable, for an M-802 and simply re-wire it according to the above table.....or start from scratch and the above info will get you connected...


2) As for remote operation....(controlling the radio from the modem)....I don't know if the M-801e will do this, but it should....and should work as the M-802 does....
ASSUMING that you have the M-801e set-up for operation outside the actual maritime bands (for use of Sailmail and Winlink), then it should work...

I do NOT have an M-801e, nor do I have a PTC-II, so I cannot be certain....but assuming things are "normal" and the PTC-II, or your computer, will output either NMEA or RS-232 to the radio, then you'd use the corresponding NMEA or RS-232 connections on the M-801e's 9-pin "REMOTE" (9-pin "D") connector...

For the M-801e these connections are, for all practical purposes, the same as with the M-802...except..
Except that is NMEA is selected the M-801e has a second set of NMEA in and outs...
See page 59, of the Icom M-801e manual for details...


The M-801e' 9-pin REMOTE connector pin-out details...

Pin 1
DCD = Input terminal for carrier detection. (“RS-232C” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)
-------
NMEA OUT (-) = Ground for NMEA OUT + (“NMEA” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)
Pin 2
RXD = Input terminal for receive data. (
“RS-232C” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)

-------
NMEA-OUT (+) = NMEA0183 ver. 3.01 data output. (
“NMEA” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)

Pin 3
TXD = Outputs transmit data. (
“RS-232C” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)

-------
NMEA-IN (+) = NMEA0183 ver. 3.01 data input. (
“NMEA” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)

Pin 4
DTR = Outputs data terminal ready signal. (“RS-232C” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)
-------
NMEA-IN (-) = Ground for NMEA-IN (+). (“NMEA” selection for REMOTE IF. (p. 46)
5 GND = Connected to the ground.
6 DSR = Input terminal for data-set-ready signal.
7 RTS = Outputs request-to-send data.
8 CTS = Input terminal for clear-to-send data.

9 NC = No connection.





3) Some info on RFI, from Sailmail...
Quote:
These signals, or something equivalent, will be present on the transceiver's rear-panel accessory connector or front-panel mike and speaker jacks, so simply match up equivalent signals (and keep a drawing of how you did it!).

A few comments on RFI: A transmitter putting out 100-150 watts in digital modes can generate quite a bit of stray RF, which often finds its way into the HF modem and computer cables and raises all sort of havoc. A good ground system and shielded cables with clip-on ferrites installed are essential. It is always necessary to use clip-on ferrites, and a coax line isolator (next to the tuner in the coax that leads to the radio) to block RF interference. So save yourself time and aggravation by purchasing 12 clip on ferrites and one line-isolator from the vendors mentioned below, and install them when you install and set up your modem.

Ferrite chokes come in two useful sizes: one is about 1" long with a 1/4" hole through the middle, and the other is about 1" long, with a 1/2 " hole through the center. Ferrite chokes act as RF blocks, allowing intended "differential-mode" signals to flow, but blocking any undesirable common-mode RF currents. Their primary function is to break up RF ground loops and keep RF current off of cables where RF interference can couple into everything. You should clip a ferrite choke onto both ends of the wire between the laptop and the Pactor-modem, onto both ends of the wire between the Pactor-modem and the SSB, onto both ends of the tuner control/power wire between your tuner and your SSB, and finally onto both ends of the antenna coax between the SSB and the tuner. If you have a remote control wire between a SCS PTC-II and your SSB, or between a second serial port on your laptop and your SSB, there should also be a ferrite choke on both ends of this wire. Most installations also benefit from ferrites clipped onto the power wires to the SSB and to the Pactor-modem. If your SSB interferes with your autopilot, try clipping ferrites onto both ends of all of your autopilot interconnections. The ONLY place that you SHOULD NOT clip a ferrite choke is onto the antenna lead-in wire between the High Voltage output of the antenna tuner and your backstay or whip antenna; the common-mode RF signal in this wire IS the intended signal, and must not be attenuated. Ferrites nearly always help, and in any event can do no harm, on all other wires.

Ferrite chokes with a 1/4 " hole are available from Radio Shack, or from any of the Marine Electronics Dealers listed on the opening page of the SailMail website. Another source of high-performance type-31 ferrite chokes is The Radio Works (www.radioworks.com) 800-280-8327. They come either with a 1/4" hole for $2 each, or with a 1/2" hole for $4 each. The chokes with a 1/4 " hole look neat when clipped onto the SSB and laptop wires, but the 1/2 " hole chokes allow you to put multiple turns of the wire through the choke, which is multiple times more effective. The 1/2 " hole choke is generally required to fit on the tuner control wire, the SSB power wire, and the antenna coax between the SSB and the tuner. When you clip on a ferrite choke, it is essential that there is no air gap between the two halves of the ferrite. If your ferrite will be a permanent installation, the best practice is to remove the two halves of the ferrite choke from the clip-on plastic case, mate the two halves around your cable, and then tightly tape the two halves together with stretchy plastic tape. This technique ensures that the two halves of the ferrite are tightly pressed together with no air gap between them. If you are neat and careful with the taping, the result can look very professional or you can snap the cover on over the tape. Again, get a dozen snap-on ferrites.

A ferrite Line Isolator is highly recommended to be put in the coax between the transceiver and the tuner (ideally near the tuner). A Line Isolator is a much beefier version of a clip-on ferrite choke (about ten times more effective) and blocks the stray RF path to ground via the coax shield and transceiver ground, forcing the antenna currents to use the proper ground strap that is connected to your antenna tuner. An excellent Line Isolator is model T-4 (ungrounded version) which costs $30 from The Radio Works (www.radioworks.com), 800-280-8327, their web site also has an excellent discussion on grounding and RF interference. Also, be sure to put two or more clip-on ferrite chokes on the tuner control/power wire, some near the tuner and others near the SSB.


4) A few tidbits...

http://www.radios.net.au/pactor-email-via-radio-/modem-accessories/cat_119.html

http://www.sailcom.co.uk/pactor/
http://www.sailcom.co.uk/transceivers/

http://www.hfes.nl/Communication-Marine/Icom-IC-M801E/flypage_images.tpl.html

http://www.mobilesystems.co.nz/product_details/p/272/c/50/Icom_IC-M801E_SSB_Marine_Radio

http://trymax.com.au/icom-icm801e-hf-radio/

http://funk-an-bord.de/technik-blog-fahrtensegeln/114-icom-m801e-open-programming.html

https://www.whitworths.com.au/main_itemdetail.asp?cat=114&item=69788&intAbsolute Page=22





I hope this helps....

Fair winds...

John
__________________

__________________
John, KA4WJA
s/v Annie Laurie, WDB6927
MMSI# 366933110
ka4wja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 18:54   #3
Registered User
 
ka4wja's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Florida
Boat: Catalina 470
Posts: 2,033
Re: ICom m801e to Pactor PTC-IIusb cable pin diagrams

Johol,
Oppss...I forgot to include the direct links to the SCS PACTOR modem interconnect cables for the M-801e....

SCS sells the exact cables you need....

Audio Connection Cable ICOM 9-pin Sub-D β€”

http://www.scs-ptc.com/shop/products...32-with-gender

Sorry I forgot these links earlier...



Fair winds...

John
__________________
John, KA4WJA
s/v Annie Laurie, WDB6927
MMSI# 366933110
ka4wja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-05-2015, 10:59   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Boat: Farr 11.6
Posts: 10
Re: ICom m801e to Pactor PTC-IIusb cable pin diagrams

Thank you so much for that John, much appreciated. I will solder up the cables as I have some that came with the Pactor when I bought it and will work the rest out while under way.

Here are some diagrams from the 801e manual along with the Remote options and af/mod pin table you mentioned.

Once again thanks for pointing me in the right direction
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	801e.png
Views:	265
Size:	157.7 KB
ID:	102143   Click image for larger version

Name:	801e remote options.png
Views:	219
Size:	78.5 KB
ID:	102144  

Click image for larger version

Name:	801e AF-MOD pins.PNG
Views:	158
Size:	14.2 KB
ID:	102145  
__________________
johol is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
icom, pactor

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Icom-M710 SSB & Pactor SCS PTC II mattyc Classifieds Archive 12 18-01-2011 19:56
For Sale: Australia: ICOM IC-M802 SSB + PTC-II USB Pactor Modem + AT140 Tuner TrevC Classifieds Archive 15 19-08-2010 22:56
PTC-IIusb Help Pa La O La Marine Electronics 4 21-12-2009 11:30
Icom M710 Pactor IIUSB: cable configuration Paul Willems Marine Electronics 5 09-10-2008 16:56



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:31.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.