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Old 19-01-2017, 08:25   #76
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

We do A LOT more walking to get anywhere. Even if we're in a marina, the long walk down the dock, across the yard and back is typically 10 times longer than a walk from the house to the car in the driveway. Once you're tied to a dinghy dock, it's not like getting out of your car and walking into a store......more walking.

I agree with the constant motion of the boat. But also, I find we are simply DOING things on the boat. When on land, we are vegging in front of the TV, which is incidentally most of my 'boredom snacking' occurs.
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Old 19-01-2017, 16:38   #77
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Agree about exercise for the sake of exercise. It's too easy to not do it.
Walking more and being generally more active works much better. Harder to just skip it.

The amount of calories you burn doing 'pure' exercise is a couple hundred for most people. I can eat that in about 30 seconds.

Calorie reduction is the best way to stay thin along with being active.

I imagine living aboard on the hook would be good for weight maintenance.

Chris
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Old 19-01-2017, 17:02   #78
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

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Calorie reduction is the best way to stay thin along with being active.

I imagine living aboard on the hook would be good for weight maintenance.

Chris
Actually, it's best to eat a lot and burn it off with activity.

I never diet although I may decrease my donut intake from time to time for vegetables and fruits for proper "movements."

But I sail a small boat which causes you to burn more calories. I don't have a dinghy with an engine but a kayak.

I don't have a ladder on my boat. I hike to the store for supplies, etc, etc....

But then you can burn lots more calories on land with running, cycling, hiking, going to the gym, walking the dog, cutting grass, working the garden, washing the car, tree trimming, etc. Then if you add in coastal cruising.......
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Old 19-01-2017, 18:25   #79
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Seems like I read something about what I am about to post, earlier in this thread, but here is my experience.

When we took our new (to us) sailing vessel (then named Bonus) home from Daytona via the ICW, my wife commented about how she felt so fully worked over by virtue of moving to the foredeck to watch for debris in the water, moving back to the cockpit to tiller while I watched the debris and nav markers, and as she and I alternately went below to catch a nap or make a sandwich. At the same time, we also spent evenings fishing (and she would be upset if I told her I posted this and did not include her exclamation "I caught a freakin' stingray!!" into the post, as that catch she made was possibly the highlight of the trip for her-she loves to fish, and the fight of that ray just made her grin like a kid).

I think the motion of the boat underway in combination with the climbing and balancing along our various paths on board this relatively small vessel, in combination with the leaning and twisting that comes from working around the shrouds and various bits of deck hardware is pretty good reason for a less active person to feel like they just got worked over by a bantam weight boxer with a proclivity for stomach punching. The workout your legs and core get can be pretty substantial, and we were only in the ICW.

This was nothing like what I have seen with deeper water excursions. In the Navy I had substantial muscle mass in my core and thighs because of all the running up and down ladders (metal staircases) on board an aircraft carrier as well as all the walking about on the 4 acre flight deck, as well as a few visits to smaller craft (almost all craft types other than tankers and massive cargo ships are smaller than supercarriers however) made my legs quite strong, and my forearms both looked like those of Popeye the Sailor, minus the tattoos that my shipmates often sported.

Another thing is that you don't usually carry a Big Mac and fries on a cruising boat and you have to select your food options with at least some eye to spoilage and nutritional density if you want to remain fit enough to continue more than a week at a time, or you are going to A) spend a lot more, and B) occupy more space than you needed to with less nutritionally dense foods that will make you fatter and less able to negotiate the vessel in rough weather.

Now, I am not saying that I don't believe there are some quite hefty folks cruising about, but in the few cases I have witnessed, those folks tended to be on larger vessels than mine, the vessels had far more creature comforts, and they tended to motor more than sail, from what those specific folks told me, unless they had additional thin folks along to manage deck and sail duties for them.

I do have to agree, however, that most folks I have seen doing that life have been thinner than those hefty folks I have met who represent the other and far less common instances in my own experience.

I will be happy to join the ranks of the thinner ones one day, though, as I could happily lose about 70...er... 80 pounds or so and still be at 200 pounds and "fighting trim" for my 6'2" frame.

A little weight loss would do wonders for my knees and back, too, I would bet.

(a little irony with that last imoji, I suppose!)
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Old 19-01-2017, 18:44   #80
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Sailingfan.just a quick question. What bird farm, your rate, and when? Me cvn 70, ht, in the 80`s and early 90`s
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Old 19-01-2017, 21:13   #81
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

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Sailingfan.just a quick question. What bird farm, your rate, and when? Me cvn 70, ht, in the 80`s and early 90`s
USS Forrestal (CV-59), 1986-1990 (then on to shore duty, NAS Jacksonville, Florida, bounced around a bit during shore duty term, and then got marooned here for a LONG time), AG (arrived as an AGAA, departed as a newly frocked AG2).

You were on the USS Carl Vinson! You and I exchanged glances (or I and your ship did) when the USS Forrestal left the Indian Ocean (Gulf of Oman) and if you had checked with your onboard weather office, I am the actual person who discovered and logged "Davisburg" in the official passdown record for your ship, as well as for the US Navy's operations in that theater thereafter.

I discovered that unidentified (and previously unknown to the US and apparently our allies) weather broadcast station the hard way, using the radio knobs, one digit at a time, starting at 0 (zero) Hertz, until eventually I located a strong enough signal to lock our systems onto for weather reports in that area (at that time, there were no other reliable stations, especially given the level of material in the atmosphere during that season, and we could only plot vague isopleths otherwise in our surface analysis charts because of lack of data points in the amazingly unoccupied Indian Ocean, and the unreliable Soviet shipping that constantly listed their locations on dry land in the weather reports (I managed to crack that one too, but got no credit for it in our circles because there were so few of even those ships that that second discovery made no difference there relative to the impact of the newly discovered radio signal which had paid off so well). Your forecasters probably loved me. LOL!! I am going to hunt down that frequency again one day, folks here may be able to make use of it, if they have not already seen it listed someplace!

The books did not have any listings of available weather code broadcast channels of use at the time that would reliably give good data in the area and a strong signal for more than a few hours at a time, now and then, and Davisburg came in solid and clear, day or night, a significant oddity as the night time frequencies are traditionally at the opposite side of the "dial" from daytime frequencies due to the diurnal effect on the wavelengths these signals are sent upon.

We even occasionally got weather faxes on it, but they sometimes were danged rough. You had to learn the schedule or you got garble because the faxes came after the numerical codes, and the output had to be routed correctly or you got squat and a lot of wasted stinky Wefax paper-that stuff smelled like a New Orleans or Naples gutter while still damp. If you routed the fax signal to the teletypes, you got random crap as well, so it was advantageous to be observant!

I actually got a good look at the USS Carl Vinson as we passed one another at your inchop (our outchop), you know she was a few feet longer than the Forrestal (we were 1,039 and the Vinson was 1,092 I think, but she looks pretty close to the same to casual observation at about 300 yards through that airborne sand layer). I think you had an extra elevator though, not sure.

Was sure glad to see you guys arrive, though, we had been at sea for maybe 150 days or more, and that hot weather, sandy mud on the decks every day, and constant haze so thick I could actually see sunspots on the sun without eye protection got old damned fast...

On the bright side, we did get lobster tails and 2 beers each at the 130 day mark on station! I think we also set some sort of record on our time on station for a US battlegroup flagship. Hope to see you often here!

Vis Per Mare from First In Defense!

Nice to meet you, shipmate!
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Old 19-01-2017, 21:14   #82
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Danged small world!
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Old 19-01-2017, 21:55   #83
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

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Danged small world!
I bet we spoke a time or two as well I was an ht1 and an off duty mars operator (k7wld) and we were 1152 ft long before the typhoon dammage. Got a new bow and lost our bridle brakes. With that storm in 89 also lost one of my boys to rogue waves.
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Old 20-01-2017, 05:38   #84
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

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Originally Posted by FlyingScot View Post

(...)

Calorie reduction is the best way to stay thin along with being active.

(...)
bump

To lower body weight, calories intake must be much below the neutral level.

BUT to be fit, even the slim person must exercise.

So this is like 'eat less exercise more' mantra in case of any person who considers himself or herself overweight or unfit.

Simple, elegant and works.

b.
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Old 20-01-2017, 15:50   #85
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

This has been interesting to read everyone's comments, but it's extremely anecdotal. Has anyone done a survey to see what the BMI of full-time cruisers is versus land-based folks who just enjoy the water every day? I think that would be a more accurate evaluation than comparing cruisers with the rest of the population. Statistically speaking, cruisers are by definition, 'outside the norm.' In spite of all that, I still ascribe to a lot of what has been said, particularly that you're burning calories just by operating a boat, and that your muscles are reacting whenever the boat is in motion. I found the following quote (below) on the Vendee Globe website, and though I doubt if any one of our boats is in the IMOCA class, it's still is very relative to this topic. (And if you laughed, too, about the calories needed for complex thinking, with us 'normal' individuals, it's actually not that much: https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...hard-calories/)

"Here [on the raceboats] you have at least five meals a day: three big ones and two snacks, one in the afternoon and one at night. These big meals only just make up for the calories burnt. For example, just reacting to the movement of the boat with reflex reactions consumes almost 1000 calories. Add the disturbed nights, all the physical effort, the cold and damp. Then all the thinking, which also consumes energy and in the Southern Ocean you come to 5000 calories a day."
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Old 21-01-2017, 05:21   #86
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

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(...)

"Here [on the IMOCA (barnakiel) raceboats] you have at least five meals a day: three big ones and two snacks, one in the afternoon and one at night. These big meals only just make up for the calories burnt. For example, just reacting to the movement of the boat with reflex reactions consumes almost 1000 calories. Add the disturbed nights, all the physical effort, the cold and damp. Then all the thinking, which also consumes energy and in the Southern Ocean you come to 5000 calories a day."
A very good quote, even though this does not apply to cruising. Different movement, different effort, different ocean, different everything.

If you rewind Armel's landfall vid, you will hear Samantha giving some more insight (on which muscles get build up) and there is also a comment earlier in vendeeglobetv videos (I think from Maitre Coq Jeremie Beyou) on atrophy of his leg muscles).

You will easily notice that an average cruiser daily intake is also about 5000 calories ... then we are beginning to see the causes of our obesity.

b.
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Old 21-01-2017, 06:13   #87
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
bump

To lower body weight, calories intake must be much below the neutral level.

BUT to be fit, even the slim person must exercise.

So this is like 'eat less exercise more' mantra in case of any person who considers himself or herself overweight or unfit.

Simple, elegant and works.

b.
Actually, there's not much evidence it works at all, in fact there's more research now showing it doest work, nor can it, for most people.

Science evolves as better studies are done and biases in earlier studies are uncovered.

Yes, exercise is great, but for health not weight loss.
CI/CO Calories in/calories out is a concept put out by Coke to make you think HFCS doest kill you.

Anyway, have a look at this article in the British Medical Journal as it's pretty much the latest view:

Quote:
It is time to bust the myth of physical inactivity and obesity: you cannot outrun a bad diet

http://bjsmbeta.bmj.com/content/earl...15-094911.full

And this on from the British Journal of Sports Medicine about diets that do work
http://bjsmbeta.bmj.com/content/51/2...ampaign=buffer
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Old 21-01-2017, 06:23   #88
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Another quote:

"... With more than a third of Americans considered obese, it's no surprise that the country has the highest calorie intake of any other in the world.In a new infographic from health website (edited) showing how much food residents of various countries eat per day, the U.S. trumps with 3,770 calories, followed closely by Austria with 3,760. ..."


You will note, these are AVERAGE FOOD calories (most cruisers intake well above the average, as consumption is related to affluence).


Then add the MARTINIS & BEER (up to 250 cal each), say 3 a day ..


Ooooppsss, and here we are living couch potato lives and eating as if we were racing an IMOCA in the Southern Ocean!


Simple facts, simple explanations.


Love to all you fat and slim,
b.





Source: https://www.12wbt.com/blog/nutrition...east-calories/



Source: Daily calorie intake of countries across the world revealed | Daily Mail Online
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Old 21-01-2017, 06:33   #89
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

I don't think you read my link.
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Old 21-01-2017, 06:36   #90
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Re: Why are there few high-weight Cruiser Folk?

Here's some more anecdotal evidence.

After Christmas took my boat out for a short shakedown. 17 days from north Florida to West End Grand Bahama and back. Ate big meals and lots of calories every day and dropped from 180 lbs to 170 lbs.

When I first bought the boat just living on the hook I lost a few lbs and lost another 7-8 in a two week trip down the ICW to FL from RI.
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