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Old 29-04-2015, 07:44   #871
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I forgot to add that I have been dinghy sailing since a child so just not much big boat experience


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Old 29-04-2015, 15:37   #872
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by brookiesailor View Post
I forgot to add that I have been dinghy sailing since a child so just not much big boat experience


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Brookie - If you are a sailor you could get the boat home without all the other knowledge, just an iPad or PC. Don't procrastinate.

We were 2.3 years living aboard and knew nothing when we crossed the Tasman 9 months ago, struck wind gusting to 50 knots, had engine issues and inner stay fitting broke. But after a while I just knew our sailor/delivery skipper was a good enough sailor to get the boat home even without a motor, batteries, rudder etc. (he could have steered with a drogue.) I realized he was by far the best piece of equipment we had on board and I learnt an enormous amount just by taking note of everthing he did.

I think with your skills and if your focus was on food, drink, warmth and the gear above deck you'd be fine.
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Old 04-07-2015, 17:20   #873
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I would like to take all the wannabees around Barbados on tours ,, need business badddddddddddddd, www.barbadosskippervancetours.com
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Old 05-07-2015, 20:29   #874
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Good topic! Since 'wannabesailor' is my name here (an unfortunate choice that I've not figured out how to change!), it only seems appropriate to comment.

The kinds of posts described above -- never been on a boat, but selling everything to sail rtw -- must be sidesplitting funny to those who have been doing this in one way or another since they were kids and are accomplished sailors and navigators. I always like to imagine the ensuing folly!

At this point, my goals are modest. Took a first step last summer by sailing in Haverstraw Bay on the Hudson with a forum member who invited me aboard his very nice Ericsson 32. The air was light, which allowed a lot of time for explaining stuff about the boat and the usual basics. I had already read a learn-to-sail book (Franzen), so had some idea about what things were and how they worked. What I didn't know was patiently explained by the skipper.

In a month, I'm doing the ASA 101 course. Assuming that goes well, I'd like to do the Coastal Cruising course.

Planning to downsize by this time next year, from large old house to an apartment. A portion of the proceeds from home sale will provide the purchase price for a used boat and a reserve fund (thinking 40-50k, 10k ish, respectively) to cover things that might need upgrading, etc.

While fantasizing about sailing rtw is fun, I'll be perfectly happy to achieve a basic level of good seamanship that will allow me to cruise the waters of the US East Coast and the Caribbean.

So, consider this my first update!
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Old 15-07-2015, 03:25   #875
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Another Choy Lee story. He prepared new engine, painting, sails, interiewed crew, did test sailings...but took a pay increase and moved to East Coast. In this case he had all the money needed to retire and go..but continued work
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Old 15-07-2015, 08:40   #876
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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While fantasizing about sailing rtw is fun, I'll be perfectly happy to achieve a basic level of good seamanship that will allow me to cruise the waters of the US East Coast and the Caribbean.
!
Life is full of dreams and fantasies but sometimes we get much different than what we dream of and often it turns out better. To us, water is water. If that meant we were back on a small lake as opposed to cruising coastal and beyond 2/3 of our time, it would still be boating and pleasure.

As to wannabe's who don't continue their direction toward sailing or cruising, many of them encounter challenges that prevent them, but many also find other things that fulfill them more in life. I'll give one example from a personal friend.

They're a wonderful couple and always had a boat. She'd been involved on the water all her life and has a business that is boat related. Their daughter, who was a blessing they'd been told they'd never have, was born with various challenges. Yet, this girl, now a teenager, has brought more beauty, sweetness, and love into their lives than imaginable. However, she did have an extremely strong fear of boats. They sold theirs and bought an RV. In that RV they've covered thousands of miles, showing the country to their daughter. They didn't turn from boating, they turned toward a different and better life.

As important as it is to most of us, sailing and cruising aren't the be all, end all. There are many other ways to enjoy life. If suddenly my wife and I couldn't be on the water, we'd find a way to enjoy life together without it and our life wouldn't be unfulfilled because of it. No, it would just be fulfilled in different ways. And as long as we were living it together, then it would be wonderful.
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Old 19-07-2015, 10:15   #877
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

...update from a former "wannabee"...we have been living the dream aboard our catamaran since Sept 2014.
Our story is simple. We got the idea in our heads visiting a boat show in San Diego in 2008. We just could not get it out of our heads and with enough life choices in the direction of getting on the boat we (wife and I + 2 children) moved onto a 2006 Lagoon 410s2 in Sept 18, 2014 in Tortola BVI. We had a brush with Gonzalo in BVI in October but are still on the boat and currently in Carriacou as a part of a 4 boat convoy (sometimes 6-7 boats strong) that started in St. Martin.
Our girls are happier than they have ever been as they have best friends on the other boats. Birthday parties are a big event and everything about this trip has been amazing. All the fears of our land loving families and friends have proven to be just fabrications of the media and Internet. We have all survived bouts with motion sickness and now passages are not a big deal. Our longest single passage was just over 90NM between St. Anne (Martinique) and St. Vincent island (Bequia). On that passage (5:30am to 6:30pm) we passed within a few feet of a pod of Orcas, saw a few schools of dolphins, passed many fisherman who all waved and were friendly, two whalers who waved and were friendly off St. Vincent. It was a nice passage. Rough in places but we all looked back on it as a really great passage due to the amazing encounters with the sea life.
There are hundreds of details left out but the short version is if the dream is in your head all you must do is just make the life choices required. They are not the same for everyone but you can write them down as a list of what must be done to get on that boat and then check them off. Do not let fear decide anything on this adventure and you will be rewarded with a life changing positive experience.
The story of others we met is not so different. I suppose we have far less sailing experience than most others but we made up for it by learning quickly and doing a great deal of research. If you drive a car you can sail a boat. Just get the experience on the water via sailing lessons, crew for others, charter etc until you are comfortable and able to handle your own boat. Starting in the BVI was a big plus for us as that is about as safe of a place to start as I can imagine. You can learn to anchor there, learn to sail your new boat there, find lots of places to challenge yourself without many reefs or hazards you will find outside the BVI.
We will probably sell the boat after the hurricane season but only because for us the adventure has met all our expectations and we are just ready to go do some more land adventures back in the USA now. Probably starting by buying an RV and traveling the USA next.
I hope this encourages more "wannabees" to keep at it and make it happen. You will not regret it.
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Old 25-08-2015, 15:35   #878
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

We also poked our nose out onto the waters. We retired early and bought an Island Packet 31 near Port Charlotte, FL. Some wannabes become cruisers. Rookie, making a lot of mistakes, sweaty, tired cruisers......but cruisers none the less.

Having a ball and learning more every day.

Mike and Brenda


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Old 26-08-2015, 07:00   #879
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Good on ya Mike and Brenda.

My last day at work is this Friday. The masts go back up next week, then we sail back to the house to clean it out for the new buyer. After that? Who knows...


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Old 27-08-2015, 07:13   #880
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

We are trying to pull our finances together to purchase a boat in the next six months... With kids in college/going to college next year it is a challenge but we figure we aren't getting any younger so why not now? We are looking at two options a new boat that we won't take delivery of for a year plus or a used boat available immediately. Both have their pluses and minuses. Letting hubby crunch the numbers and we will see what happens from there....


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Old 21-10-2015, 01:51   #881
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by pbmaise View Post
Another Choy Lee story. He prepared new engine, painting, sails, interiewed crew, did test sailings...but took a pay increase and moved to East Coast. In this case he had all the money needed to retire and go..but continued work
So unlike his brother Bruce, he wasn't prepared to "Enter the Dragon" then? That may be more apt than people appreciate. *grins*

First, on seasickness. I have been seasick precisely 'once' in my life. My heart goes out to those that suffer with it. It is appalling.

It also coincided with what was also one of the most exhilarating experiences I have ever had while afloat - a Force 10+ in the Bay of Biscay. While on deck, it was WOOOOOHOOOOO! (surfing doesn't even begin to compete . . . ), however when I went below, no good at all.

So I looked into making sure that never got in the way of my enjoyment of the water, ever again. I didn't get on with Drammamine. Then found Stugeron. It took a while to work out how to use it properly, as the instructions said "Take two tablets . . . " and doing that just made me fall asleep (not good, but effective if don't actually have to do anything, until you get your sea legs). What I hit on, was taking HALF a Stugeron, 30 minutes before going aboard. eta: I found with Stugeron you can tell when it is working, and for me, if necessary (the effects wearing off) another half a Stugeron 24 hours later worked ok.

Now my experience with what some call wannabe's fits in with this approach to seasickness, and will illustrate how effective Stugeron can be. But rather than calling people "wannabe's" I will call them non-apprentices. They won't listen, they won't pay attention, they have no awareness of the Real World[tm] further than the end of their nose, and they refuse to learn (sometimes this is due to long experience with a related field, and they think they "Know It All").

Everybody else is an Apprentice (we never stop learning).

Now my friend Steve turned out to be a non-apprentice, after many years in the Merchant Navy. He bought a very nice Macwester 26 bilge keel boat at a very nice price. I was approached to help him with it after he purchased it, when the previous owner was going to accompany us down a very tricky estuary to show us the way, then anchor off the beach a few 100 yds, so the previous owner could run through all the systems with him, to be followed by a day out down the coast.

We arrived early in the morning on a beautiful day, with a high tide just before 7:00 am. On arrival, I broke out the Stugerons, took half, and offered Steve and the previous owner the packet, but they both declined, as conditions were so nice.

So down the estuary we go, and drop anchor as planned a nice distance off the beach. Muggins disappears below to make breakfast, and leave the other two to get down to the guided tour. As I was cooking, the chat in the cockpit gradually subsided, and thinking they had decided to enjoy the sunshine and get comfy, I eventually carried a tray of bacon sandwiches, toast and marmalade, and big mugs of tea, to see both of them almost as green as Holly leaves. I have never seen anybody that green, before or since. There was a long, slow, pulling swell, and it did them both in.

Luckily I hadn't left the Stugeron in the car, so I broke them out. I told them not to swallow them (they would have thrown them up in no seconds flat), but to put two under their tongues to dissolve, to get the stuff into their bloodstream.

I then watched what happened.

Within 10 minutes, the green went down both their faces, you could watch it progress down their necks and away, to be replaced by them being as white as a sheet. Within another 10 minutes, their colour returned from their necks up.

They were both now hungry as horses, the sandwiches were now cold, the toast and marmalade was now cold, the tea was also cold, and muggins had to go below and do another breakfast.

After which, we pulled up anchor, and headed down the coast to a cove with a pub, with the idea of stopping for a beer. When we got there and dropped anchor, Steve and previous owner were fast asleep, thanks to two Stugerons. So I had to go to the pub on my own, while they slept in the cockpit. Then I had to sail the boat back, and up the estuary, then moor it, on my own (I had a fun sail, it was just sad they both missed it).

Despite this experience, and witnessing the common sense of taking half a Stugeron before going on board, Steve never took one again!

Every time we took his boat out (usually accompanied by an old hand, Bill, who I also sailed with on his boat), Steve would be below, with his head in a bucket, suffering, while Bill and myself were having an enjoyable sail.

Now there's lessons for me here too. I don't want to become a non-apprentice, like Steve did. He ended up selling his boat, and not doing any of his plans for it, basically because he refused to learn. All he needed to do, was a few RYA Courses (he did do the Marine VHF lifetime licence - which annoyingly proved not to be lifetime - and had a really enjoyable time with the good people on the Course), to lift his awareness up, and get in the swing of the basics. Instead of which, he sold the boat.

In my case, I have been off the water for too long. In the years since, I have had a whale of a time touring Europe solo on my motorbike, carrying everything I need on the bike. This has been excellent value, and I have met vast numbers of really nice people in the process. The trouble is, for the places I need to go (health reasons - my planned boat is going to have to have facilities for disabled solo sailing), have become stupidly expensive. Plus, even places like Andalusia in Spain, have become too cold for me in the Winter.

So I have to chase the Sun, and salt air is a more than useful component in what I need.

In recent years there is a lot of new gear I am not familiar with, plus, I have to resit the blasted Marine VHF licence, plus it seems a good idea to get the ICC. Heck I even have to practice knots again.

So I am going to start with a RYA beginners Course, mainly from the point of view of observing, with a bit of hands on, and chatting with the instructor about what would be a good idea for rigging for solo disabled sailing. I 'should' then be in a position to do a Competent Crew course and go for the ICC, plus do a RYA Radar Course.

As an aside, I do think a lot of 'Apprentices' do a disappearing act, when they discover what a rip off the sailing scene has become. Prices are outrageous and totally unwarranted, for basic gear.

As a former importer/exporter and wholesaler/retailer, I have seen the consequences of this far too often in my life, and it is an approach to 'business' (it isn't 'business', this is cartel, monopolistic, racketeering) that is unsustainable, and self destructive.

To me, the boating industry, is committing suicide on the grand scale. Businesses that put their prices up going into a Depression, never survive the Depression.

Presented with such an environment, the only way you win, is you refuse to play, and people are now refusing to play in many areas, and not just with the boating industry.

PS. You may have noticed I picked the user name 'Ribbit'.
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Old 25-10-2015, 18:52   #882
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I'm a wannabe. I started a thread, "50 and ready to shove off". We have purchased our boat, a 1982 Cape Dory 36. It took about.....1 day of actual boat looking and 1 year of yachtworld wishin'. We found our perfect boat the first day out. I bought it from a man that spent 6 years in the Hanoi Hilton with John McCain as a cell mate. That is a story in and of itself.
I sailed it from Pensacola to Corpus Cristi with my 27 year old daughter and a shipmate that knew what he was doing , 700nm +\- and 6 days. That was my first voyage. The boat is currently in a slip in the Corpus Christi Municipal Marina and my wife and I are working to get the boat paid off so we can start our adventure.
So many things can get in the way...aging parents, a son deploying to parts unknown, a daughter that needs a a strong man other than her Dad and a couple that's 50+ with all the land based commitments that consumes your day.
It's our goal to also hit the great beyond in 3yrs. We've got a sturdy boat, a good attitude and the desire.
I'm sure we'll have enough money to do this for at least a year or two....after that, how will we afford it? That's my midnight nightmare.
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Old 11-03-2016, 12:20   #883
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Michelle and I have always wanted to live off-the-grid, to be self-sufficient, and to travel relatively affordably, and were looking for ways to do that.

In September of 2014 Michelle and I discovered that people could live on sailboats (liveaboards) and could sail around the world while living self-sufficiently and off the grid. We've been addicted to the idea ever since.

We saved up about $15K while living in Edmonton and was going to buy a sailboat. But then personal matters happened, family trouble, etc. We moved to Surrey, BC on December 24, 2015, and by that time our $15K had turned into $0.

So now we're starting all over again. We have about $10K in cash, and we're looking for a sailboat once again.

We've found the hardest part of all of this so far - is just finding the damn boat. We know there's no such thing as perfect, but each one you find either costs too much, is the wrong type of sailboat you want, or everyone on CF says "DON'T DO IT".

It's stressful but we're not giving up. But we'll live on an inflatable boat from Walmart if we have to! Lol
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Old 11-03-2016, 12:49   #884
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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We've found the hardest part of all of this so far - is just finding the damn boat. We know there's no such thing as perfect, but each one you find either costs too much, is the wrong type of sailboat you want, or everyone on CF says "DON'T DO IT".

It's stressful but we're not giving up. But we'll live on an inflatable boat from Walmart if we have to! Lol
You have to take the "don't do it" with a grain of salt, especially if you are trying to buy a boat south of a hundred thousand. Too much money on this forum.

It took me about four months of daily searching on the internet to find my '73 Morgan OI. I only had $15K and I was consistently told things like "you can't get much of a boat for less than XYZ dollars" (way more than I had).

Well guess what, I found a great boat, lovingly maintained and in stellar shape. The owner wanted $13K took $10k, I put $4K into repairs and boat stuff, then sailed (or motored) it single handed about 700 miles back to NC.

And yep, those same folks are to this day muttering that I "didn't get much of a boat" but I don't care, nor pay much attention to them. I absolutely LOVE this boat and you can and will find something for yourself.

I will say that I started out determined to find one specific boat and ended up with something much different. There is a lesson in that somewhere.

BTW there is an entire thread on boats under $30K. Not updated often enough but it will give you hope.
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Old 11-03-2016, 16:02   #885
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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You have to take the "don't do it" with a grain of salt, especially if you are trying to buy a boat south of a hundred thousand. Too much money on this forum.
<--- snip --->
LOVE this boat and you can and will find something for yourself.

Now THAT is the spirit! And well said too. I wonder how many have given up on their dream on account of that xyz dollar snobbish attitude?
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