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Old 12-11-2012, 06:47   #451
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by atoll View Post
generally referred to as "Character's",and great sources of local knowledge...........every marina should have one
Yep, and they are so convincing which is why my first monohull is a 1974 Bristol 27 after 17 years of racing high tech 16'-20' late model catamarans with high aspect ratio sails, rudders, and daggerboards (and spinnakers). I used to hang out on the dock at my apartment in Pensacola with the monohull guys. In the 1990's, you could rent an apartment there for around $450.00 per month and your slip fee was $50.00!

This old Bristol is a tank and just wallows through the waves downwind even in 20 knots which does wonders for my stomach. Anyway, I figure it's best to pay some dues first then move up to a better, faster more high tech design. (or maybe just stay with a plastic classic)
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Old 12-11-2012, 07:59   #452
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Originally Posted by thomm225

Have you even tried staying on a boat yet? You might consider getting just a tad more experience before you sell everything then buy and try.

Some folks get seasick, some cannot find enough to do especially in the am. Do you enjoy cycling or the gym. What will replace that? Then there are the rainy cold days in the small cabin. Just some thoughts.

I'm doing it the slow way with weekend and vacation trips (while I still work) which isn't the best way because by the time I get somewhat adjusted it's time to sail home, BUT I'm learning STUFF about this sailing business like being somewhat seasick but having to go forward while cruising to fix a jammed furler which included multipule trips back to the cabin for tools while the winds were around 18-20 with close, steep Chesapeake Bay entrance waves! Fun stuff especially the dry heaves that went with the experience.

Then you have those beautiful 70 degree days that start off at 40 and not much warmer in the cabin. It's just not the same as your average house or apartment and takes some getting used to especially if you are over age 25 or so.
Yes we have spent time on boats, I have not had a problem with getting sick but hubbie has had a little bit. We spend ALOT of time in the RV. It is smaller than the cat we will be looking for and I assure you we have been stuck inside the RV durning nasty weather that has Made for days of tight quarter confinement. I do my detail cleaning during this time and he does the wire repairs or inside stuff that needs fixed. Not to mention card games and such. We are very fortunate in that we truly like each other and each others company......the next vacation is going to be all sail as well. We have a friend that takes us out on her sailboat now and although its not blue water it is at least time getting comfortable with the mechanics of it.

We have been married for 25 years and have been trying to find the what's next part since he retires in 22 months. We could do the RV life but have done a lot of that already and we have found thru vacations that we have a passion for places like Costa Rica and Belize and we have taken the time to get dive certified and that helps feed our underwater addiction that we acquire in Maui so the best way we can think to explore more places both above and below is to sail there. If we keep everything here the expense is to much for a retired person so since we will be in our mid-40s it just sounds like the best option for us.
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:37   #453
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by got seashells? View Post
Yes we have spent time on boats, I have not had a problem with getting sick but hubbie has had a little bit. We spend ALOT of time in the RV. It is smaller than the cat we will be looking for and I assure you we have been stuck inside the RV durning nasty weather that has Made for days of tight quarter confinement. I do my detail cleaning during this time and he does the wire repairs or inside stuff that needs fixed. Not to mention card games and such. We are very fortunate in that we truly like each other and each others company......the next vacation is going to be all sail as well. We have a friend that takes us out on her sailboat now and although its not blue water it is at least time getting comfortable with the mechanics of it.

We have been married for 25 years and have been trying to find the what's next part since he retires in 22 months. We could do the RV life but have done a lot of that already and we have found thru vacations that we have a passion for places like Costa Rica and Belize and we have taken the time to get dive certified and that helps feed our underwater addiction that we acquire in Maui so the best way we can think to explore more places both above and below is to sail there. If we keep everything here the expense is to much for a retired person so since we will be in our mid-40s it just sounds like the best option for us.
Okay, sounds like you are more prepared than some, but watch out how you throw around the term "not bluewater." We have a hellacious argument going on another thread about what makes a boat bluewater capable. I'm just glad you didn't mention what type boat it was she has... (-:
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Old 15-11-2012, 18:30   #454
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I apologize in advance for this lengthy post. It is a sad tale of our first sailing experience in case you don't want to read it.

I felt I should chime in here for severall reasons:

I am a self-styled wannabe .

Furthermore, my wife and I recently went out sailing for the first time in a late 1970s model Ranger 38.

It was not the greatest experience, in terms of enjoyment, because we ran into sooo many problems in our little "3 hour Tour" .

We got to the slip near Annapolis around 11a.m. after driving for 2.5 hrs. Did'nt stop for food, so we had empty stomachs... We were assured that once we shoved off there would be opportunities to stop for lunch dockside somewhere, so we did not push the issue of food.

The boat seemed to be in good shape, but the headliner and interior bulkheads were spotted with mold. No biggie for the daysail we had planned, but an issue I took note of, and my wife pointed out several times.

As we were making ready, the Captain checked weather on the VHF and let us know that the steady 25 knot South Westerly winds were going to give us a great day on the water. That sounded a little on the high side to me, but what do I know?

Pulling out of the slip was interesting... the engine linkage was really sloppy/loose, and when it finally engaged in reverse, the boat moved at a snails pace. You could tell by the engine noise that the RPM's were revved pretty high, and the output should have been significantly better. The Captain made a comment that he thought the boat was underpowered. It was only his second time sailing this boat.

We motored out between a maze of pylons, and the Captain gave us a crash course on "Right of Way", nomenclature of various equipment...etc. Everything was going great! We reached the bay outer marker pylon (?) and raised sails...

The boat sped off at a great clip (In my wannabe opinion), it seemed to be literally skipping across the surface of the water from swell to swell...pretty rough handling too as we were headed into the wind from the North, and the wind created three to four foot, white-capped, rapidly occurring swells.

We turned to port and headed for the Bay Bridge, and everything smoothed out, it was awesome! I remember looking at my wife and smiling in this "see I told you this would be incredible" kind of knowing grin.

As we neared the bridge, I asked the Captain if there was a place nearby we could put in for a bite to eat. He said we would have to go inland toward a huge cluster of sailboats nearer to Annapolis proper...and then told us what we would have to do to get the boat turned around under sail.

We tacked to port again...and came around 180 degrees. All hell broke loose with the sails, and my buddy and I were furiously hauling on lines and winches to get it back under "control"...

There was a sudden CRACK!!! that came from the keel, and we were launched forward in the cockpit! The wind was hitting us full on the Port side and the Captain yelled "Get the sails down!" or something like that, and tried to get the engine in full reverse.

We were run aground with 6 foot of keel in 3 feet of water and deep mud beneath that. Probably a full 1/4 mile from shore. The depth went from 12' to 3' in a heartbeat.

As if this was'nt bad enough, the engine was leaking heavy exhaust fumes into the cabin, which was pumping out of the hatch right into the cockpit. My wife and I were so nauseated from the fumes, we could'nt get away from it. Add to this the relentless pounding of the 25kt wind and swells hammering the boat, and you got a recipe for vomit .

We were stuck fast in the mud. The Captain had 30 years of experience, and he never ran aground before. He said something about using the anchor to pull us off, so my buddy and I worked our way forward and wrestled the anchor, and it's heavy chain aft to the cockpit.

We tied floats to it and the Captain said he was going to swim it out and drop it. At this point I was paralyzed by nausia, but deep down I knew I should have been the one to try to swim it out. I am a very strong swimmer and probably 20 years younger and 100 lbs. lighter than the Captain.

To my infinite shame, I did'nt speak up, and we failed to get the anchor set far enough or effectively enough away to make a difference.

We had to call for Sea Tow. 2 hours and $950.00 later, with much emptier stomachs we were putting along at 3kts into the wind...then, just as we were nearing the pylons, the engine started smoking huge billowing clouds of white smoke! We cut the engine and came in under the Jib only(?) (front sail).
(I suspect the water cooling intakes were clogged with mud)

That was the best part! The winds died down drastically, and I had both lines semi-wrapped around the winches. As we turned through the pylons I would play out one line and draw in the other to maximize motive force to the boat.

To have the wind blowing past your ears and filling the sails was well worth the 3 hour fiasco beforehand. I had a vomit-encrusted permagrin the whole way to the slip.

My wife and I needed hours to recover from the severe carbon monoxide poisoning and seasickness, and we really did'nt feel better until we had a good nights sleep.

Despite all that happened, I would'nt trade the experience for anything. We learned so much in such a short time...mistakes have a way of being a great teachers, especially ones everybody can walk away from!

Cheers,

William
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Old 15-11-2012, 18:48   #455
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by WannaBeWanderer View Post
Despite all that happened, I would'nt trade the experience for anything. We learned so much in such a short time...mistakes have a way of being a great teachers, especially ones everybody can walk away from!

Cheers,

William
That's the type of story we normally read about where some guy takes his girl friend/wife out for the first time................and then wonders why they don't want to go out again.
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Old 15-11-2012, 19:03   #456
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by Don Lucas View Post
That's the type of story we normally read about where some guy takes his girl friend/wife out for the first time................and then wonders why they don't want to go out again.
We have a winner! How'd you know?

She only said never again on that boat... so I'm good right?

It cut me deep when I learned that my sense of adventure and her's are totally different. I am still trying to find that happy middle-ground for the both of us.

~William
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Old 15-11-2012, 19:11   #457
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I wish you luck. The reason we own such a great boat (in our minds) is because a really nice guy and experienced sailor took his wife out in 20 kt winds off of Jacksonville FL to show her how much fun cruising is... she stepped off, said never again, he piddled on the boat for a few years, added some good electronics, and sold it to us because it just wasn't any fun by himself.
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Old 15-11-2012, 19:28   #458
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaBeWanderer View Post
I apologize in advance for this lengthy post. It is a sad tale of our first sailing experience in case you don't want to read it.

I felt I should chime in here for severall reasons:

I am a self-styled wannabe .

Furthermore, my wife and I recently went out sailing for the first time in a late 1970s model Ranger 38.

It was not the greatest experience, in terms of enjoyment, because we ran into sooo many problems in our little "3 hour Tour" .

We got to the slip near Annapolis around 11a.m. after driving for 2.5 hrs. Did'nt stop for food, so we had empty stomachs... We were assured that once we shoved off there would be opportunities to stop for lunch dockside somewhere, so we did not push the issue of food.

The boat seemed to be in good shape, but the headliner and interior bulkheads were spotted with mold. No biggie for the daysail we had planned, but an issue I took note of, and my wife pointed out several times.

As we were making ready, the Captain checked weather on the VHF and let us know that the steady 25 knot South Westerly winds were going to give us a great day on the water. That sounded a little on the high side to me, but what do I know?

Pulling out of the slip was interesting... the engine linkage was really sloppy/loose, and when it finally engaged in reverse, the boat moved at a snails pace. You could tell by the engine noise that the RPM's were revved pretty high, and the output should have been significantly better. The Captain made a comment that he thought the boat was underpowered. It was only his second time sailing this boat.

We motored out between a maze of pylons, and the Captain gave us a crash course on "Right of Way", nomenclature of various equipment...etc. Everything was going great! We reached the bay outer marker pylon (?) and raised sails...

The boat sped off at a great clip (In my wannabe opinion), it seemed to be literally skipping across the surface of the water from swell to swell...pretty rough handling too as we were headed into the wind from the North, and the wind created three to four foot, white-capped, rapidly occurring swells.

We turned to port and headed for the Bay Bridge, and everything smoothed out, it was awesome! I remember looking at my wife and smiling in this "see I told you this would be incredible" kind of knowing grin.

As we neared the bridge, I asked the Captain if there was a place nearby we could put in for a bite to eat. He said we would have to go inland toward a huge cluster of sailboats nearer to Annapolis proper...and then told us what we would have to do to get the boat turned around under sail.

We tacked to port again...and came around 180 degrees. All hell broke loose with the sails, and my buddy and I were furiously hauling on lines and winches to get it back under "control"...

There was a sudden CRACK!!! that came from the keel, and we were launched forward in the cockpit! The wind was hitting us full on the Port side and the Captain yelled "Get the sails down!" or something like that, and tried to get the engine in full reverse.

We were run aground with 6 foot of keel in 3 feet of water and deep mud beneath that. Probably a full 1/4 mile from shore. The depth went from 12' to 3' in a heartbeat.

As if this was'nt bad enough, the engine was leaking heavy exhaust fumes into the cabin, which was pumping out of the hatch right into the cockpit. My wife and I were so nauseated from the fumes, we could'nt get away from it. Add to this the relentless pounding of the 25kt wind and swells hammering the boat, and you got a recipe for vomit .

We were stuck fast in the mud. The Captain had 30 years of experience, and he never ran aground before. He said something about using the anchor to pull us off, so my buddy and I worked our way forward and wrestled the anchor, and it's heavy chain aft to the cockpit.

We tied floats to it and the Captain said he was going to swim it out and drop it. At this point I was paralyzed by nausia, but deep down I knew I should have been the one to try to swim it out. I am a very strong swimmer and probably 20 years younger and 100 lbs. lighter than the Captain.

To my infinite shame, I did'nt speak up, and we failed to get the anchor set far enough or effectively enough away to make a difference.

We had to call for Sea Tow. 2 hours and $950.00 later, with much emptier stomachs we were putting along at 3kts into the wind...then, just as we were nearing the pylons, the engine started smoking huge billowing clouds of white smoke! We cut the engine and came in under the Jib only(?) (front sail).
(I suspect the water cooling intakes were clogged with mud)

That was the best part! The winds died down drastically, and I had both lines semi-wrapped around the winches. As we turned through the pylons I would play out one line and draw in the other to maximize motive force to the boat.

To have the wind blowing past your ears and filling the sails was well worth the 3 hour fiasco beforehand. I had a vomit-encrusted permagrin the whole way to the slip.

My wife and I needed hours to recover from the severe carbon monoxide poisoning and seasickness, and we really did'nt feel better until we had a good nights sleep.

Despite all that happened, I would'nt trade the experience for anything. We learned so much in such a short time...mistakes have a way of being a great teachers, especially ones everybody can walk away from!

Cheers,

William
the captains name wasn't "Ron" by any chance!
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Old 15-11-2012, 20:58   #459
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

William,

There is an old joke in the sailing community. "There are two kinds of sailors, those who have run aground and lairs."
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Old 17-11-2012, 19:53   #460
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Originally Posted by thomm225

Okay, sounds like you are more prepared than some, but watch out how you throw around the term "not bluewater." We have a hellacious argument going on another thread about what makes a boat bluewater capable. I'm just glad you didn't mention what type boat it was she has... (-:
Good to know, I should clear that up by saying the body of water is not blue water. We are in Oklahoma and there is nothing close to blue water here......and the only sand is in sandboxes or pretty decorations around the house....
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Old 17-11-2012, 20:02   #461
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaBeWanderer
I apologize in advance for this lengthy post. It is a sad tale of our first sailing experience in case you don't want to read it...
Sounds like a pretty typical day on the water.
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Old 18-11-2012, 21:22   #462
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Quote:
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William,

There is an old joke in the sailing community. "There are two kinds of sailors, those who have run aground and lairs."
I just spend a lovely day on Sydney Harbor, and the guy briefing me started by pointing out where he had run aground in his sailing career. Nice guy, and obviously honest. A good day was had by everyone, even though the breeze was a tad to irregular...
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Old 19-11-2012, 13:57   #463
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

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Originally Posted by CCBullseye View Post
William,

There is an old joke in the sailing community. "There are two kinds of sailors, those who have run aground and lairs."
Is thaaaht the southern version? Or more phonetically, " those who haaave run ahhhground and laiahhhrs." (GRIN)
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Old 19-11-2012, 14:05   #464
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Re: What happens to all the wannabees?

I always say, "If you haven't run aground, you haven't gone anywhere."
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Old 24-11-2012, 02:15   #465
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I always say, "If you haven't run aground, you haven't gone anywhere."
I'm not sure we qualify as wannabes any more since we have made the transition from the land to the sea. But we still haven't left the dock in PR yet -- still outfitting (island time is really, really slow!).

However, I do not think running aground in the Great Salt Lake qualifies us for going anywhere, but we did run aground there! Very shallow lake, deepest part is +/- 30 feet.
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